Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

A long history of enduring sensitive teeth doesn’t mean a lifetime. Minimize sensitive teeth related to food.

1.)  Chew Gum

Reduce sensitive teeth by chewing gum (sugarless of course). Chewing a stick of gum’s a great way to keep saliva flowing. Chewing creates ample saliva helping prevent periodontal disease (gum disease). The benefits of chewing gum are particularly measurable in the initial thirty minutes immediately after a meal. When you chew gum it increases salivary flow, helping to wash away debris and bacteria that may be stuck to teeth. Gum that contains xylitol can also aid in remineralizing enamel.

2.) Eat Fewer Processed Foods, Especially Starchy Carbs

We all know the dangers associated with sugar filled snacks and juices. Sugar wreaks havoc on teeth. Surprisingly, crackers, chips, cereal and other starchy snack foods can be just as detrimental as sugary snacks. Starches readily convert to usable sugars when consumed by the bacterial colonies in your mouth.  Brushing after starchy snacks, even chewing gum can reduce the particles left behind. This keeps acids excreted by bacteria to a minimum, preventing periodontal disease and decay.

3.)  Get Your Teeth Cleaned by a Professional

It’s not enough to just brush and floss in order to protect your teeth from the threat of decay and periodontal disease. Eliminating sensitive teeth takes an all over approach. For optimal conditions you need to have your teeth cleaned. In the chair–the dentist chair–where your dentist and their hygienist can inspect each tooth and surrounding gum tissue for potential problems.

While in the chair your teeth will be scaled (scraping off all tartar, stains, and plaque) with special tools designed especially for each tooth.  Your tooth will even get scaled below the gum line. Plaque and tartar may be accumulating out of sight, initiating periodontal disease. After your teeth have been scaled they will then be polished. Polishing the teeth at the end of the cleaning is the step that gives you that slippery feeling on your teeth. Did you know when your teeth get polished it removes all microscopic abrasions and scratches? Places where bacteria might be able to get a foothold. That leaves teeth smooth and strong.

4.) Get Enough Sleep

Second only to smoking, studies show sleep is the next biggest factor in worsening periodontal disease.  Our schedules are busier now than ever before. Often there are more demands for our time than we can accommodate. Lack of sleep has been shown to affect how rapidly we age. lack of sleep affects how readily our immune system respond. Sleep even effects our response times while driving or reacting to physical demands.

Now scientific studies also conclude that periodontal disease gets measurably worse in patients who routinely get six or less hours of sleep per night. In the same studies, those patients who increased their nightly sleep up to seven or more hours saw a dramatic decrease in the spread of periodontal disease.

Poor gum health, from gum disease, can stimulate nerves in teeth inducing sensitive teeth.

5.) CoQ10–Proper Vitamins and Nutrition

Naturally, the first line of defense against all forms of gum disease is proper dental hygiene, including brushing twice daily, flossing once a day plus routine professional cleanings. Good oral health also requires proper nutrition. Supplements and nutrients that are known to work to boost the immune system. They also build collagen in the periodontal ligaments, and decrease inflammation. This helps to stop gum disease before it gets started – and helps to heal gum disease. One of the most researched and highly recommended supplements for fighting gum disease is CoQ-10.

In Recent studies CoQ-10 was given in a blind study in which candidates with significant gum disease (periodontal disease) were chosen after aggressive brushing and flossing had no measurable impact. Those patients receiving the CoQ-10 had measurable and sustained improvement from their periodontal disease, in many of the patient’s gum disease completely resolved after only 8 weeks of therapy.

There are a number of choices when choosing the CoQ-10 that is right for you. Learn about your options and choose wisely.

Give us a call today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth Sensitivity Triggers are varied, and many are avoidable

Not so uncommon to experience tooth sensitivity at least once. Most people have tooth sensitive many times in a life time. Surprisingly, many triggers are diet related. Certain foods exacerbate tooth sensitivity, while others can help quell the problem.

How you brush counts

Too much brushing or excessive tooth brushing can result in gum recession, thinned dentine, and overall inflammation. Brushing teeth after meals or at least morning and night. Using a soft bristled tooth brush for about two minutes (or 30 seconds per quadrant of the mouth.) follow brushing by flossing once a day, for ideal time frames relating to hygiene at home.

Water picks are also useful at dislodging debris from hard to reach spots in the mouth and definitely do not add to irritation or inflammation that may already exist.

Dental work can trigger tooth sensitivity

Many dental procedures keep teeth and gums healthy, cleanings with a professional are vital to long term tooth and gum health. The draw back is that cleanings, because of their nature, stimulate nerves in the teeth. Sometimes the scaling, cleaning and polishing can excite the nerves inside a tooth and cause temporary sensitivity.

Other dental procedures that can cause tooth sensitivity are teeth whitening procedures, fillings, dental repairs, and braces installations. Even some types of mouthwash, especially used multiple times.

How you sleep counts

Grinding teeth while sleeping can wear away dentine, cause cracks, fractures and micro fissures. Any one of those leave teeth vulnerable. When dentine is breached through wear, or fractures and cracks it exposes the sensitive nerve inside the tooth via microscopic tubes in the teeth.

Diet counts

Acidic foods and sugary food can trigger food sensitivity, especially if dentine is thin or worn.  Cold and hot foods are the other food culprits to tooth sensitivity. Avoiding these foods can diminish the number of triggers your teeth are exposed to daily.

Eating foods the help remineralizing teeth can also diminish reactions from foods.

Pearly Whites, Their Whitest

Pearly Whites, Their Whitest

The new year is looking brighter and whiter.

We all like to start off the new year refocusing on what’s important and dialing into priorities that may have gotten set aside in recent days. Many of us take inventory and realize that we are so busy taking care of our families and our careers that it’s no surprise that New Year tends to reinvigorate the desire to take better care of our own selves.

Cleaning up our diets, kicking up our physical fitness routines, and getting other affairs into order so we feel healthy, vital, organized, and ready to reach new levels of success.

While setting up parameters to uncover the new you don’t forget to include your teeth and getting the best and whitest smile you can!  With all the choices out there for brightening your smile you can be sure to find a method that works for you. After all, one thing that everybody would like, is whiter teeth.

The ADA (American Dental Association) strongly recommends that people go through in office dental whitening treatments, yet  many ways availe themselves to whiten your teeth at home. Methods of Teeth Whitening vary, here are a few: oil pulling at home, baking soda make-at-home-paste, dental strips, dental trays (often in kits), whitening pens, specialized toothpaste or washes, whitening kits, and in-office-dental procedures.

Teeth whitening strips: Lately teeth whitening strips have gained a lot of popularity. They are reasonable in cost and easy to use and usually very efficient. Strips are applied to teeth one to two times per day for a prescribed length of time. One drawback can be that patients may experience increased tooth sensitivity after each treatment or application.

Whitening paints: Whitening paints are not actual paint. They are effective based on the same mechanics that make traditional strips and trays work, a hydrogen peroxide product that but instead of a strip or tray that shields the product and keeps it on the teeth it is just painted onto the tooths surface and allowed to dry, then slowly dissolves rather than being removed. One drawback to paint, as tooth whiteners go, can be the inability to achieve uniform coverage, despite this paint on types of whiteners remain fairly popular.

Whitening toothpaste or mouthwash: This is by far the easiest method to whiten teeth. All you have to do is put some toothpaste on your brush or rinse your mouth with some whitening mouthwash. Though these two things have proven to be very slow in whitening the teeth, over time they are consistent and don’t require much hassle.

Make-at-home-whiteners: A quick search on the internet will yield a dozen methods to making at home whiteners. The most popular of these utilize baking soda and or hydrogen peroxide. Some methods are as simple as using coconut oil and the old fashioned technique of oil pulling that readily reduces yellowing and plaque growing bacteria. These various techniques can help remove yellowing that has accumulated due to staining but ultimately can cause some tooth sensitivity (especially if hydrogen peroxide is utilized) and usually yield only moderate results.

Above the rest whiteners

Chairside or in office Whiteners: Still considered the best way, as mentioned

Mouth and teeth before and after whitening

Mouth and teeth before and after whitening

above, is to get in house treatment. Through innovation and science the in office whiteners are the most specialized and easily protect teeth from issues with hypersensitivity. Dr. Marilyn K Jones, a well established dentist in Houston, provides teeth whitening chairside and can offer other options that you may want to try instead of in office. Additionally, many patients find it impressive how much discoloration and yellowing can be reversed just by starting with a routine dental cleaning.

Should you have any questions concerning teeth whitening through in house method or at home methods please feel free to give us a call for more information or an appointment.

Call our office now at (713) 785-7767 to schedule your next appointment. We look forward to meeting you and earning your trust.

Wincing when you Smile: Sensitive Teeth

Wincing when you Smile: Sensitive Teeth

When sensitive teeth leaving you wincing

Is the feel of a cold drink, ice-cream or even hot soup a painful experience? Even occasionally? If brushing and flossing make you squirm, or breathing in crisp morning air, you may be suffering from hyper sensitive teeth.  Sometimes even sour and sweet things can set off an uncomfortable sensation. When this happens there are a variety of issues that your dentist can help you resolve in order to be able to enjoy foods and activities like you once did.

Possible causes include:

Hot and cold things, sweet and sour or even the feel of flossing and brushing can be excruciating if you have sensitive teeth

Hot and cold things, sweet and sour or even the feel of flossing and brushing can be excruciating if you have sensitive teeth

  • Decay. Cavities can allow nerves inside the tooth to be exposed to the extremes of hot and cold.
  • Fractured teeth. Broken teeth can obviously expose the tooth’s nerve to stimulus, but even cracks and fissures in the enamel can weaken a tooths protection from environmental extremes and stimulation.
  • Worn-out fillings.  It may be news to some patients but fillings often need, periodic, and routine replacement.
  • Gum Disease. Gingivitis and periodontal disease can stress the tooths delicate nerve making it more prone to becoming sensitive, also as diseased gums receded due to inflammation, infection and bacterial toxins the root of the tooth becomes more exposed, further reducing natural protection from soft tissues.
  • Worn enamel.  Enamel wears as we age, the thinner the enamel the easier it becomes for the cold and heat to travel through the porous dentin and enamel.
  • Exposed tooth root.  The roots of our teeth are intended to be covered and protected by gum tissue. Injuries, gum disease, harsh brushing and flossing practices can all affect gum health.

The common thread in tooth hypersensitivity

In healthy teeth, a layer of enamel goes over the portion of tooth above the gumline, protecting the sensitive parts inside teeth.  Below the gum line another protective layer–called cementum–protects the lower half of the tooth. When these layers are compromised the dentin inside the tooth may be the only barrier between the nerve and outside stimulus.

Sensitive teeth can be treated

The type of treatment will depend on the cause of the sensitivity and the recommendations your doctor thinks will help most

Some patients can alleviate symptoms with desensitizing toothpaste and remineralization efforts. Other recommended treatments may require procedures to bond or overlay the affected tooth or a portion of the tooth, including replacing old fillings.  Other patients may need surgical measures to restore soft tissue and the gum line.

Prevention is key

Proper oral hygiene is the key to preventing hypersensitive teeth and pain associated with decay, gum disease, worn enamel and loose or worn fillings.

 

The Code of Tooth Sensitivity

The Code of Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth Sensitivity

Sharp or subtle, when teeth become sensitive to the foods you eat or drink, even the activity of your day it affects your quality of life. It also may be affecting your health.  A variety of circumstances can lead to tooth sensitivity, all of them indicating that its time to do something different. From serious likelihood of infection to simple remineralization this article can help you determine what actions to start with.  bigstock-Face-full-of-pain-51688675

Teeth Are Alive

Teeth are alive, each tooth with it’s own nutrifying blood source, it’s own dedicated nerve and a living ligament to keep it anchored into the jaw bone. For this reason each tooth has the potential to cause you a significant amount of pain if something goes amiss. Think of tooth sensitivity as a red flag, a warning signal, your teeth’s way to communicate with the rest of the body when something is wrong.

Your teeth have several defenses to the help protect and keep them healthy. Below the gum line there is the periodontal ligament and the jawbone, these, paired with the gums themselves are essential to keeping teeth healthy, and alive. They provide protection, ensure healthy blood supply and encapsulate over half of the tooth to provide strength and leverage for chewing and biting. That slippery stuff known as saliva plays another huge role in keeping teeth clean, healthy, strong and alive.  Then there is the layer of enamel on the outside of the tooth, enamel also provides strength and bears the burden of being the last line of defense. The stronger your enamel the better teeth can fend off attacks from bacteria and decay, enamel even buffers the effects wear and tear.

anatomy of a healthy tooth

A Variety of Causes For Tooth Sensitivity

Triggering tooth sensitivity with a sip of a hot drink, a bite of cold ice cream, sometimes just breathing in fresh air or biting into something sweet is no fun, while getting at the cause can be a bit tricky, many people find it reassuring that tooth sensitivity is fixable. Here are some of the most common related types of tooth sensitivity:

  • Sinus problems can make teeth hurt, ache or become sensitive. Pressure in the maxillary sinus just above the jaw bone can push down into the jaw bone and surrounding nerves causing inflammation in surrounding tissues, including the nerve tissues of your teeth.
  • Orthodontic work can also make teeth ache, and become sensitive as the teeth and periodontal ligaments are adjusted to their proper alignment.

While the previous causes of tooth sensitivity may not require the attention of your dentist, the next few warrant a call and an appointment as soon as possible

  • Infections in the root of a tooth also make teeth hypersensitive to sensation, including hot, cold, sweet and sour, you may not be able to see anything wrong on the tooth or in the mouth.
  • Abscesses and periodontal infections tend to be associated with a lot of pain, not just sensitivity to hot or cold. There can, however be just deep sensitivity, especially at the initial onset of infection.
  • Cavities. or decay in the tooth itself, can cause tooth sensitivity especially when a cavity is still new and has not fully infected the root.
  • Several teeth hurting in one localized area of the mouth can be from;
    • Infection, as bacteria multiply and invade surrounding tissues the infection can spread, additionally as infection compounds–or gets worse–the blood supply to healthy tissue becomes compromised thus aiding in the spread of the infection as healthy tissues die.
    • Injury, in the instance of a broken tooth or a tooth loosened from trauma, may allow surrounding tissues to become inflamed.  The nerve or nerves (if several nearby teeth are also disturbed) become over stimulated and begin sending alarms to the brain that things are in need of repair.
    • teeth grinding or bruxism can cause localized sensitivity or even pain. Clenching or grinding the teeth–usually at night or while sleeping–can crack, fracture or even break teeth. The cracks and fissures can cause sensitivity as the enamel can no longer properly protect the nerve inside the tooth. Because of the irregular bite and tooth alignment in some mouths, it is possible to have one area of the mouth affected more than other parts of the mouth.
    • Failing dental work. If you have fillings, bridges, crowns or other dental work and the teeth involved or surrounding teeth are sensitive or hurting it could mean your dental work is failing.

So far all of the circumstances we have covered are situations that you may have little control to “fixing” by yourself. While there may be a few other causes of tooth sensitivity the ones in this article are the most typical and the last reason is, by far, one of the most common. Thankfully it is one that you can improve the symptoms of, even sometimes eliminating tooth sensitivity all together.

Sensitive Teeth

Sensitive Teeth

  • Thin, weak, and worn out tooth enamel is the most common cause of sensitive teeth. Your teeth are formed with a dense, strong coating of enamel. As you age, chewing, various foods, and the things you drink wear down and even soften the enamel making it thinner and more porous. Thereby allowing the delicate nerve inside to be over stimulated. Dentist once believed that there was very little to do if tooth enamel began to fail. Modern dentistry has better been able to definitively determine factors that can aid in remineralization of enamel weakened or worn out.
    • There are foods and diets that aid in remineralization.
    • Oil pulling can increase the enamels ability to absorb good minerals and improve the natural balance of your saliva while reducing pathogens.
    • Homemade toothpaste, the best of which employ added minerals, can not only whiten teeth but add needed minerals to reinforce and help fill in overly porous enamel, eventually leading to diminished tooth sensitivity.

For more information on tooth sensitivity click on the links throughout the article or call our office to talk with a specialist today. At Marilyn K Jones Dentisty, we have the skills, experience, and expertise you need to ensure a healthy mouth and teeth.  Call or visit today: Marilyn K Jones DDS, (713).785.7767 and at mjones@hal-pc.org.

 

 

 

Answers for Sensitive Teeth

If you’ve ever experienced sensitive teeth you know how easy it is to take for granted the routine experience of biting into a crisp apple, taking a drink of a cold beverage or shoveling in a frosty bite of ice-cream. Often, long after the experience has passed a person will still find themselves apprehensively anticipating the shock of something cold hitting their teeth.

There are lots of reasons that a tooth can become hypersensitive to hot or cold. Sometimes the real cause is inflammation, caused from trauma or infection, affecting the root and nerve inside the tooth.  Other times the protective layer of enamel may be less dense than optimal creating a more porous surface, allowing temperature changes to have a greater impact on the root and nerve inside.  Still other times a combination of factors may be involved in creating that bone zapping sensation when something hot or cold touches our teeth.

A brief list of some of the most common factors in hypersensitive teeth helps explain some of what may be going on:

  • Gum Disease. Gums that have pulled away from the tooth root or are receding, and or gingivitis can cause the root to be exposed allowing changes in temperature to cause that nasty sensation. Receding gum lines and gingivitis both require a visit to the dentist to assess and then plan a remedy.
  • Old fillings with decay around the edges or under them.  Over time fillings weaken, even occasionally fracturing. Bacteria can colonize these microscopic cracks and crevices and erode away the enamel on the healthy part of the tooth well away from your spying eyes.  See your dentist especially if you suspect this particular issue, if the sensitivity is getting worse or just in one or two teeth it can be an indicator that decay is likely.
  • Excessive plaque. Brushing and flossing removes plaque that forms after you eat, excessive build-up of plaque can cause enamel to wear away. Without  their enamel protection teeth quickly become more sensitive. Practice good daily dental care and visit your dentist for regular cleanings every six months — or more frequently if necessary.
  • A recent dental procedure. This is one of those times where the nerve inside your tooth can potentially get a little hyper, causing sensitivity sometimes even to air!  Keep in contact with your dental professional if you experience this kind of sensitivity, they will want to monitor you and give recommendations for management.
  • Tooth-whitening toothpaste and some mouthwash. Many manufacturers add tooth-whitening chemicals to their toothpaste formulas, and some people are more sensitive to them than others. If your toothpaste or mouthwash could be to blame for tooth sensitivity, consider switching toothpastes.
  • Eating acidic foods. Acidic foods can weaken enamel creating a more porus surface on the tooth, thus allowing various stimuli to reach the tooth’s nerve and resulting in pain. Eliminating excessive foods with high acidity and focusing on foods that can help remineralize the enamel can be beneficial.
  • Hard toothbrush bristles and over zealous brushing. Brushing with too much force and or a harder bristle can wear down the protective layers of enamel and effect the gum line as well. Use a toothbrush with soft bristles and brush for the recommended times, about 30 seconds per quadrant of the mouth.
  • Other causes such as tooth grinding (or bruxism) and or cracks and fissures in the teeth can also contribute to tooth sensitivities. These and other issues can be discussed with your dentist to find solutions and fix the condition, eliminating painful symptoms.

Other Helpful Tips

A lot of people turn to fluoride as the potential cure for a sensitive tooth or teeth when there are other long term solutions available that potentially work better and are safer. Homemade toothpaste to remineralize teeth, proper brushing, adequate sleep, diet, and appropriate dental visits are all part of complete mouth health.

Call us Today to get more information and set up your consultation.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org