Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

What Came Before the Modern Toothbrush?

Ever have time to ponder the little things in life, like what came before the modern toothbrush?

What came before modern toothbrushes was a lot more rotting teeth!  In fact regardless of fluoride, countries across the globe that employ modern dentistry and routine dental care have all recorded progressively lower rates of decay and tooth loss over the last 100 years.  We have all benefited from the advent of the modern toothbrush.

The toothbrush in your bathroom cabinet is the culmination of not just revision after revision, science and engineering has brought forth the best version ergonomically, hygienically and scientifically to clean and deter further bacterial colonization and plaque build up on your pearly whites.

The First Toothbrushes

Bearing in mind that people have always had teeth, it may not be surprising that we’ve been attempting to keep them clean and healthy for a very long time. The toothbrushes predecessor, the chew stick, have been unearthed in various places around the globe The oldest chew stick, found in Babylonia and dated to 3500 BC, followed by archeological evidence in Egypt dating to about 3000 BC.

Chew Stick or teeth cleaning sticks.

Chew Stick or teeth cleaning sticks.

Chew sticks were a stick that was tapered on one end and frayed on the other end. The soft frayed ends were used to gently clean the surfaces and the pointed end could dislodge debris stuck in the teeth crevices and cracks.  A variety of trees or bushes could be employed to make chew sticks.  Different regions and cultures each, had their own prefered bush or tree, sometimes cinnamon, sassafras or even tea tree and walnut. Well over a dozen different types of trees/bushes with bitter roots were utilized for chew sticks, or teeth cleaning sticks.  The types of trees and bushes typically selected for teeth cleaning or chew sticks have long been known to have antimicrobial benefits that no doubt benefited the user to some degree.

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Toothbrush believed to have belonged to Napoleon

Eventually the chew stick evolved into a bristled brush similar to our more modern toothbrushes. The first of which have been unearthed in ancient China.  The Toothbrush made it’s way across the globe and while the handles varied between bamboo, ivory and bone, the bristles on those first toothbrushes were generally made from horse-tail hairs, boar bristles, even badger fur. By the 1900’s modern handles made from man made materials were the norm and nylon bristles were standard.

 

The Zenith of the Toothbrush

Over the last hundred years or so the toothbrush has changed but is still recognizable from even its earliest versions. The biggest difference in the latest models are those brushes that offer ultrasonic cleaning speeds.  We easily assume that this feature is but a mere gimmick, yet by far, this is the pinnacle of hundreds of years of reinventing and researching oral health. Today’s ultra-sonic toothbrushes–outfitted with a new toothbrush head and properly charged–remove stains, debris and colonies of bacteria both above and below the gumline. Ultrasonic toothbrushes may even contribute in retarding harmful anaerobic bacteria.

As ultrasonic toothbrushes are moved from tooth to tooth they create thousands of teeny-tiny bubbles, some that may be small enough to slip into the tiny space between the teeth and gums. Those little bubble are all it takes to break up the party of nasty anaerobic bacteria hanging out down below the gumline. Anaerobic bacteria can be some of the stinkiest and contribute, extensively, to periodontal disease, gum disease, decay and other oral infection.

By now you’re probably day dreaming about a nice rendezvous with your new, modern, toothbrush!

Contact our office weather you still use a chew stick or even if you have the fanciest, latest version–the ultrasonic toothbrush–we can help you make sure your oral health and your whole health are in alignment.