Oil Pulling – A New Approach to Removing Oral Toxins

Oil Pulling – A New Approach to Removing Oral Toxins

A simple practice known as ‘oil pulling’ may be one of the very best ways to prevent or treat mouth and gum disease. It has been a popular and practical exercise of Ayurvedic medicine for ages and was more recently introduced to Western cultures by a Dr. F. Karach, M.D. in the early 90s. Karach advocated oil pulling due to the results he detailed in the treatment of a variety of of illnesses including everything from migraine headaches and bronchitis, to gum disease, leukemia and heart disease – just to name a few.

A 2009 study conducted by researchers Asokan, Emmadi, Chamundeswari seemed to back up earlier claims and highlight the effectiveness of oil pulling on the treatment of gum disease. This trial involved swishing sesame oil to test it against plaque-induced gingivitis in 20 test subjects, and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash. Results concluded that there was a significant reduction in “… the plaque index, modified gingival scores and total colony count of aerobic microorganisms in the plaque of adolescents with plaque-induced gingivitis.”

How oil pulling works

Longtime practitioners of oil pulling recommend using sesame, safflower, sunflower or vegetable oil but recently the anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties of coconut oil has made it the preferred go-to oil to use. Practicing oil pulling is a simple process that starts with swishing a tablespoon of your preferred oil back, forth and around the mouth and teeth for anywhere from 15 to 20 minutes –followed by a thorough rinse and routine brushing. By adopting this practice into your oral care routine – and doing it first thing in the morning, you may begin to reap some of the benefits including:

• Healthier gums
• Whiter teeth
• A significant reduction of plaque and tartar
• Fresher breath

Killing bacteria with oil pulling

At any given moment, the human mouth contains an assortment of active microbes, with bacteria being the most prolific. Experts estimate that more than 100 million microbes thrive in every milliliter of saliva – containing upwards of 600 different species of bacteria — some beneficial, others harmful. Without following a regime of proper oral hygiene, the nastier bacteria will eventually collect and form a sticky film on teeth and tongue. Left untreated plaque and other bacteria can flow into the digestive tract and potentially cause, or aggravate, a wide variety of chronic health issues.

The enzymes naturally found in food grade oils are thought to help pull toxins, pus and mucus away from not only teeth, gums and tongue, but also from the body’s cells, blood and digestive tract. Ayurveda suggests that oil pulling works by purifying, cleansing and detoxifying the entire system by removing harmful toxins. In Ayurveda each section of the human tongue is connected to corresponding vital organs of the body such as lungs, kidneys, stomach, colon, liver, spine, heart and small intestines. By keeping the teeth and tongue free of toxic buildup through the practice of oil pulling, you’re actually helping to keep the whole body healthy.

Conclusion

Proper dental hygiene is not only important for oral health, it is essential to all aspects of wellness. Adding oil pulling to already established oral care techniques including brushing and flossing and avoiding sugars and processed foods, it is even more possible to maintain a healthier mouth and body.

More Information:

http://www.jaim.in/article.asp?issn=0975-9476;year=2011;volume=2;issue=2;spage=64;epage=68;aulast=Singh#ref19

http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/article%20oil%20pulling.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/08/coconut-oil-combats-tooth-decay.aspx
http://www.oilpulling.com/
http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/oil_pulling.html
http://hubpages.com/hub/Health_Benefits_of_Oil_Pulling_
http://www.homemadebodycleanse.com/cleanse-recipes/sunflower-oil-pull.htm
http://www.jonbarron.org/article/oil-pulling-detoxing

And — How Coconut Oil Can Be Used As A Mouthwash (VIDEO)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/02/coconut-oil-mouthwash-video_n_2375038.html

Resources: Asokan S, Emmadi P, Chamundeswari R. – Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Indian J Dent Res 2009;20:47-51.

 

Why Dental Implants are Better Than Bridges

Why Dental Implants are Better Than Bridges

Why dental implants are better than conventional bridges

When it comes to options for tooth replacement patients are increasingly opting for dental implants over the usual dental prostheses such as dentures or conventionally placed bridges. Since an implant sits securely in the jaw and looks like natural teeth, they offer superior durability and outstanding aesthetics when compared to conventional bridges.

There are four major categories of restorations available for tooth replacement:

Bonded dental bridge

Bonded dental bridges use the teeth adjacent to the empty space to help support the missing tooth by using a very thin piece of metal or tooth-colored material to overlay and bond to the back of the adjacent teeth. A tooth replacement is set between these two bonded pieces in order to fill in the empty space. Failure rate is about 25 percent after just five years of use.

Cantilevered dental bridge

A cantilevered restoration uses the closest tooth next to the empty space to support the missing tooth using the either the back of the neighboring tooth or a full crown to help support the missing tooth. Success rate is higher than with a bonded bridge depending on how much pressure the actual replacement endures due to grinding and normal wear.

Conventional dental bridge

This type of restoration uses crowns on the teeth next to the empty space that are hooked together to help support the missing tooth. Unfortunately conventional dental bridges predictably fail at a range from 20 percent over 3 years to 3 percent over 23 years.

Dental implant

A dental implant is created from a high performance material (zirconium oxide) that is inserted into the bone to act like a natural tooth-root. Due to its nonmetallic construction the ceramic dental implant does not interfere with the body’s immune or meridian systems and therefore does not create a potential for rejection. Once anchored into the jaw, the implant integrates directly into the bone to give firm support to the artificial replacement that it is built to hold and should last the lifetime of a patient.

Routine maintenance of a dental implant is exactly the same as a person would follow for normal teeth.

Healthy patients prefer implants

Patients who prefer dental implants say that they are more comfortable and provide a more secure fit than fixed bridges or removable dentures. Dentures tend to make a person feel and look older. They can cause embarrassment in social situations when they slip and click, and hamper the everyday pleasure of eating comfortably.

Reasons to consider a ceramic dental implant:

• preserves healthy natural tooth

• looks and feel like natural teeth

• enhances a sense of self-confidence when eating, talking and smiling

• no gooey denture adhesives to deal with

• no embarrassingly loose dentures

• improves quality of speech

• perfectly natural comfort and fit

Anyone who is missing one or more of their teeth may be a candidate for implants. If more than a few of the teeth are missing, implants in supporting a crown or bridge can replace those teeth and function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, then implants may be placed to fix in place a full-mouth fixture.

Conventional Dental Bridge

Getting fitted for a denture bridge requires the manual modification of the teeth on either side the bridge, a process that significantly weakens adjacent teeth. In order to fit a conventional bridge the structure of the existing teeth has to be ground down to support the false bridge. This practice weakens adjacent teeth while dental implants do not affect the health or longevity of neighboring teeth at all.

Once established, implants are firmly set into the bone making them more natural than dentures or conventional bridges, with none of the shifting that dentures normally display.

Some problems with conventional bridges

• since they are bonded to the adjacent tooth with a glue-like substance, bridges more often become loose and fall out

• Cracks and fissures form over time, due to normal wear and tear, causing them to become fragile and prone to breakage

• Improper fit can lead to either tooth decay or irritation to the surrounding sensitive tissue in the mouth

No such problems with implants

Ceramic dental implants are recommended to patients because:

• Chewing is easy with excellent biting pressure provided by implant

• Dental Implants have a good reputation for providing reliable and long-standing service, providing decades of use with few, if any complications

• Comfortable fit and durability because they are well secured and integrated with the bone and gums

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

How Are Holistic Dentists Different From Traditional Dentists?

Dr. Marilyn JonesBefore we can get into depth on the differences, I think its important to look at what the word holistic really means. The word holistic is not a reflection of the practices and techniques used by the dentist, but of an overall philosophy of the role of oral care. The word itself comes from “wholistic” meaning the whole.  Truly holistic dentists will educate patients on the importance of overall health and how dentistry can play a role in the overall health.

All dentists to some extent see the importance of the mouth in the overall health of an individual. For instance, studies have concluded a link between gum disease and heart health, diabetes, and pregnancies. However, many dentists are not trained in the long term effects of what dentistry does (or could possibly do) to the whole body. Hence the reason the field of holistic dentistry was formed.

Truly holistic dentists are dentists who perform dentistry that is good for the body as well as the teeth and gums.

There are dentists who call themselves holistic (for marketing or differentiation reasons) but the only thing holistic about them is that they don’t place mercury fillings. On the flip-side, there are conventional dentist who perform complex, comprehensive dentistry that involves more than the teeth and gums it involves the face, head, neck. the whole body hence the “wholistic” nature of what they do, yet they don’t call themselves holistic. To say that a dentist is one or the other is not always accurate.

Dr. Marilyn Jones has placed an emphasis on a more natural or holistic approach to dentistry. But what does this mean? What are the nuts and bolts of the differences between truly holistic dental practices and more traditional dental practices? What are the topical differences? The Issues

When most people think of holistic and natural dentistry, they think of mercury fillings. But there are many more issues that divide most traditional and holistic dental practices. (Please keep in mind that many traditional dentists practice under the philosophies of the holistic side and vice-verse. This is why labels don’t work. But for simplicity’s sake, I’ve divided the issues below.)

Mercury Fillings: Traditional dentistry espouses the longevity of mercury amalgam fillings and the fact that insurance will typically cover the cost of placement. They will also point to the ADA and FDA’s statements that the mercury in the fillings is stabilized and safe, leaking only tiny amounts of mercury. They are also typically easier for the dentist to place than composite fillings.

Holistic dentists understand that mercury is a toxin and even small amounts are too great a risk to the body and your overall health. While amalgam fillings last longer than composites, they put extreme pressure on the tooth and often cause weakening of the tooth meaning that the filling may outlast the tooth it was placed in. Truly holistic dentists do not place mercury and meet or exceed safety guidelines for removal.

Root Canals (or Root Canal Therapy): Most traditional dentists will recommend root canal therapy as a means to save a tooth that has suffered severe decay and has already or will soon die completely. They argue that the procedure has been done for centuries and has been proven safe and effective as a means to keep a natural tooth.

Holistic dentists point to the research that says root canal therapy cannot be effective unless the canal is 100% sterilized and cleaned of bacteria, and the repeated studies have shown that it is 100% impossible to completely sterilize the canal. They also argue that the chemicals used for sterilization are toxic (formaldehyde is one such chemical) and that the bacteria left in the canal can lead to adverse health affects down the road, including breast cancer, heart disease, and more. Holistic dentists typically do not recommend root canals.

Fluoride: Traditional dentists are in favor of using fluoride in both a topical and ingested form. They argue in favor of fluoridating water supplies and recommend fluoride drops for infants. They point to research showing a decrease in cavity rates in areas where the water is fluoridated.

Holistic dentists typically argue against any form of ingested fluoride, arguing that research has linked ingested fluoride to cancer and various bone problems while other research has shown no benefit to the teeth from ingested fluoride. They also argue that too much fluoride can cause fluorosis and that fluoridating public water supplies is forced medication of the general public. Some holistic dentists are for topical fluoride and some are against it.

Bio-compatibility of Dental Materials: Most traditional dentists don’t believe in bio-compatibility testing and will not test you to see if the materials they use will cause a reaction when placed in your body. Most traditional dentists do not explain the differences between different composite filling materials nor do they give you a choice on which materials will be used for your cavity.

Holistic dentists believe that what goes into your mouth can affect your entire body and many have on-site equipment to test for bio-compatibility of the materials they use. Most holistic dentists use a variety of different composite filling materials as well as different materials for other procedures (bridges, crowns, etc.).

Summarizing the Differences: The above is a partial, topical list of some of the philosophical differences between traditional and holistic dentists. The fact remains that many traditional dentists will fall onto the side of holistic dentists in the above instances, and vice-verse. The differences between the two aren’t necessarily topical in nature (although topical differences are easy for us to understand, and easy to pinpoint, so they make a tidy way to differentiate).

The true differences between holistic dentistry and traditional dentistry is philosophical: traditional dentistry is the practice of treating the symptoms in the teeth and gums and attempting to prevent such problems from reoccurring. Holistic dentistry is the practice of treating the underlying problems that cause symptoms in the mouth, attempting to eliminate those problems (and, hence, preventing the symptoms from reoccurring) while ensuring the work done in the mouth does not have an adverse affect on your overall health.

So How Do You Know Which to Choose? So, if the differences are philosophical how do you find a dentist that’s right for you and a dentist whose philosophies match your own? Ask good questions! Ask questions such as “How do you determine which type of filling is right for me? “ and ” If I get cavities in one area of my mouth, can you tell me why?” If you want a truly holistic dentist, their answers will revolve around your entire body and he/she will discuss the role your oral health plays in your overall health. If you want a traditional dentist, look for answers that talk more about the topical symptoms and ask questions about cost/benefit and insurance coverage.

You always have the right to ask questions and know what’s going on. You never have to implicitly trust your dentist. While most dentists are good people who want to look out for your best interests, the fact remains that no two people have the same best interests and there are alternatives out there. Its more than just your right to ask questions of your medical and dental advisers, it’s your duty. It is, after all, YOUR health we are talking about.

Call our office now at (713) 785-7767 to schedule your next appointment. We look forward to meeting you and earning your trust.