Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

A long history of enduring sensitive teeth doesn’t mean a lifetime. Minimize sensitive teeth related to food.

1.)  Chew Gum

Reduce sensitive teeth by chewing gum (sugarless of course). Chewing a stick of gum’s a great way to keep saliva flowing. Chewing creates ample saliva helping prevent periodontal disease (gum disease). The benefits of chewing gum are particularly measurable in the initial thirty minutes immediately after a meal. When you chew gum it increases salivary flow, helping to wash away debris and bacteria that may be stuck to teeth. Gum that contains xylitol can also aid in remineralizing enamel.

2.) Eat Fewer Processed Foods, Especially Starchy Carbs

We all know the dangers associated with sugar filled snacks and juices. Sugar wreaks havoc on teeth. Surprisingly, crackers, chips, cereal and other starchy snack foods can be just as detrimental as sugary snacks. Starches readily convert to usable sugars when consumed by the bacterial colonies in your mouth.  Brushing after starchy snacks, even chewing gum can reduce the particles left behind. This keeps acids excreted by bacteria to a minimum, preventing periodontal disease and decay.

3.)  Get Your Teeth Cleaned by a Professional

It’s not enough to just brush and floss in order to protect your teeth from the threat of decay and periodontal disease. Eliminating sensitive teeth takes an all over approach. For optimal conditions you need to have your teeth cleaned. In the chair–the dentist chair–where your dentist and their hygienist can inspect each tooth and surrounding gum tissue for potential problems.

While in the chair your teeth will be scaled (scraping off all tartar, stains, and plaque) with special tools designed especially for each tooth.  Your tooth will even get scaled below the gum line. Plaque and tartar may be accumulating out of sight, initiating periodontal disease. After your teeth have been scaled they will then be polished. Polishing the teeth at the end of the cleaning is the step that gives you that slippery feeling on your teeth. Did you know when your teeth get polished it removes all microscopic abrasions and scratches? Places where bacteria might be able to get a foothold. That leaves teeth smooth and strong.

4.) Get Enough Sleep

Second only to smoking, studies show sleep is the next biggest factor in worsening periodontal disease.  Our schedules are busier now than ever before. Often there are more demands for our time than we can accommodate. Lack of sleep has been shown to affect how rapidly we age. lack of sleep affects how readily our immune system respond. Sleep even effects our response times while driving or reacting to physical demands.

Now scientific studies also conclude that periodontal disease gets measurably worse in patients who routinely get six or less hours of sleep per night. In the same studies, those patients who increased their nightly sleep up to seven or more hours saw a dramatic decrease in the spread of periodontal disease.

Poor gum health, from gum disease, can stimulate nerves in teeth inducing sensitive teeth.

5.) CoQ10–Proper Vitamins and Nutrition

Naturally, the first line of defense against all forms of gum disease is proper dental hygiene, including brushing twice daily, flossing once a day plus routine professional cleanings. Good oral health also requires proper nutrition. Supplements and nutrients that are known to work to boost the immune system. They also build collagen in the periodontal ligaments, and decrease inflammation. This helps to stop gum disease before it gets started – and helps to heal gum disease. One of the most researched and highly recommended supplements for fighting gum disease is CoQ-10.

In Recent studies CoQ-10 was given in a blind study in which candidates with significant gum disease (periodontal disease) were chosen after aggressive brushing and flossing had no measurable impact. Those patients receiving the CoQ-10 had measurable and sustained improvement from their periodontal disease, in many of the patient’s gum disease completely resolved after only 8 weeks of therapy.

There are a number of choices when choosing the CoQ-10 that is right for you. Learn about your options and choose wisely.

Give us a call today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth Sensitivity Triggers are varied, and many are avoidable

Not so uncommon to experience tooth sensitivity at least once. Most people have tooth sensitive many times in a life time. Surprisingly, many triggers are diet related. Certain foods exacerbate tooth sensitivity, while others can help quell the problem.

How you brush counts

Too much brushing or excessive tooth brushing can result in gum recession, thinned dentine, and overall inflammation. Brushing teeth after meals or at least morning and night. Using a soft bristled tooth brush for about two minutes (or 30 seconds per quadrant of the mouth.) follow brushing by flossing once a day, for ideal time frames relating to hygiene at home.

Water picks are also useful at dislodging debris from hard to reach spots in the mouth and definitely do not add to irritation or inflammation that may already exist.

Dental work can trigger tooth sensitivity

Many dental procedures keep teeth and gums healthy, cleanings with a professional are vital to long term tooth and gum health. The draw back is that cleanings, because of their nature, stimulate nerves in the teeth. Sometimes the scaling, cleaning and polishing can excite the nerves inside a tooth and cause temporary sensitivity.

Other dental procedures that can cause tooth sensitivity are teeth whitening procedures, fillings, dental repairs, and braces installations. Even some types of mouthwash, especially used multiple times.

How you sleep counts

Grinding teeth while sleeping can wear away dentine, cause cracks, fractures and micro fissures. Any one of those leave teeth vulnerable. When dentine is breached through wear, or fractures and cracks it exposes the sensitive nerve inside the tooth via microscopic tubes in the teeth.

Diet counts

Acidic foods and sugary food can trigger food sensitivity, especially if dentine is thin or worn.  Cold and hot foods are the other food culprits to tooth sensitivity. Avoiding these foods can diminish the number of triggers your teeth are exposed to daily.

Eating foods the help remineralizing teeth can also diminish reactions from foods.

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

Prevent Stains On Teeth – DIY Whiter Teeth

Prevent Stains On Teeth – DIY Whiter Teeth

Prevent stains and discolored teeth-Eat right, keep your teeth white.

It’s natural to want to look good. A bright smile is certainly part of that picture. Unfortunately many social gatherings present a staggering number of food and drink options that are contrary to maintaining a white smile.

Stop discoloring and staining. Load your arsenal now with a bag of tricks to help compensate. Choose carefully and you may stop or even prevent stains. In some cases you can reverse staining from indulgent social gatherings.

Know your foe

Understanding the most likely culprits at risk for causing staining to tooth enamel helps you make an informed decision on foods to avoid.  You can bet that a food that stains carpeting or clothing will also stain porous enamel. Acidic foods, tomatoes for example, make enamel softer. Soft enamel stains more readily than dense, hard enamel.

Foods that stain include, wine (red and white) blackberries, pomegranates, cranberry juice, cola, plums, blueberries, curries, vinegars (particularly dark ones,) tomato and tomato based foods. Potentially any other dark colored food with staining powers will also leave stains on your teeth.

Indirect staining -vs- direct staining

Foods can stain teeth because of their pigment. Chemical reactions contribute to staining also. Some chemical reactions from food, softens or weakens enamel . Foods that stain teeth through some combo of deep pigments and corrosive action pose an even bigger risk.

Armor for your teeth

Not all “whitening” foods directly whiten teeth. A number of foods help whiten your smile by fortifying enamel. Enamel, the hardest substance in the human body, has a porous surface. The porous surface makes teeth vulnerable to absorbing and staining causing foods we eat.

Foods that protect enamel:

These foods neutralize plaque, neutralize corrosive foods, promote saliva or remineralize enamel.

Foods that erase stains:

  • nuts and seeds
  • celery
  • carrots
  • apples
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • water
  • pineapple
  • strawberries

Fortunately all of these foods are delicious and readily available.

 

Oil Pulling Still Worth a Try

Oil Pulling Still Worth a Try

Oil Pulling, the old new thing in home dental care

Once a long lost practice, now rediscovered, oil pulling may be one more strategy you may want to put into the regime.

A simple practice known as ‘oil pulling’ may be one of the very best ways to prevent or treat mouth and gum disease. It has been a popular and practical exercise of Ayurvedic medicine for ages and was more recently introduced to Western cultures by a Dr. F. Karach, M.D. in the early 90s. Dr. Karach advocated oil pulling due to the results he detailed in the treatment of a variety of of illnesses including everything from migraine headaches and bronchitis, to gum disease, leukemia and heart disease – just to name a few.

A 2009 study conducted by researchers Asokan, Emmadi, Chamundeswari seemed to back up earlier claims and highlight the effectiveness of oil pulling on the treatment of gum disease. The trial involved swishing sesame oil to test it against plaque-induced gingivitis in 20 test subjects, and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash. Results concluded that there was a significant reduction in “… the plaque index, modified gingival scores and total colony count of aerobic microorganisms in the plaque of adolescents with plaque-induced gingivitis.”

How oil pulling works

Longtime practitioners of oil pulling recommend using sesame, safflower, sunflower or vegetable oil but recently the anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties of coconut oil has made it the preferred go-to oil to use. Practicing oil pulling is a simple process that starts with swishing a tablespoon of your preferred oil back, forth and around the mouth and teeth for anywhere from 15 to 20 minutes –followed by a thorough rinse and routine brushing. By adopting this practice into your oral care routine – and doing it first thing in the morning, you may begin to reap some of the benefits including:

• Healthier gums
• Whiter teeth
• A significant reduction of plaque and tartar
• Fresher breath

Killing bacteria with oil pulling

At any given moment, the human mouth contains an assortment of active microbes, with bacteria being the most prolific. Experts estimate that more than 100 million microbes thrive in every milliliter of saliva – containing upwards of 600 different species of bacteria — some beneficial, others harmful. Without following a regime of proper oral hygiene, the nastier bacteria will eventually collect and form a sticky film on teeth and tongue. Left untreated plaque and other bacteria can flow into the digestive tract and potentially cause, or aggravate, a wide variety of chronic health issues.

The enzymes naturally found in food grade oils are thought to help pull toxins, pus and mucus away from not only teeth, gums and tongue, but also from the body’s cells, blood and digestive tract. Ayurveda suggests that oil pulling works by purifying, cleansing and detoxifying the entire system by removing harmful toxins. In Ayurveda each section of the human tongue is connected to corresponding vital organs of the body such as lungs, kidneys, stomach, colon, liver, spine, heart and small intestines. By keeping the teeth and tongue free of toxic buildup through the practice of oil pulling, you’re actually helping to keep the whole body healthy.

Conclusion

Proper dental hygiene is not only important for oral health, it is essential to all aspects of wellness. Adding oil pulling to already established oral care techniques including brushing and flossing and avoiding sugars and processed foods, makes it even more possible to maintain a healthier mouth and body.

More Information:

http://www.jaim.in/article.asp?issn=0975-9476;year=2011;volume=2;issue=2;spage=64;epage=68;aulast=Singh#ref19

http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/article%20oil%20pulling.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/08/coconut-oil-combats-tooth-decay.aspx
http://www.oilpulling.com/
http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/oil_pulling.html
http://hubpages.com/hub/Health_Benefits_of_Oil_Pulling_
http://www.homemadebodycleanse.com/cleanse-recipes/sunflower-oil-pull.htm
http://www.jonbarron.org/article/oil-pulling-detoxing

And — How Coconut Oil Can Be Used As A Mouthwash (VIDEO)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/02/coconut-oil-mouthwash-video_n_2375038.html

Resources: Asokan S, Emmadi P, Chamundeswari R. – Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Indian J Dent Res 2009;20:47-51.

Besides Brushing, 6 Smile Fixers You Didn’t Know

Besides Brushing, 6 Smile Fixers You Didn’t Know

Time savers and smile makers

Get the whitest, healthiest smile by not ignoring these simple things you already have time for.

We all want the best of both worlds more free time and the best versions of ourselves. The latter generally involves a considerable amount of time, the last thing any of us have time for is to add more things into our routine. Surprisingly, when it comes to your smile there may be a few things that you can do with the time you already are using. Here’s the quick rundown of things to nix and things to fix your brushing routine for the strongest, whitest, brightest smile.

Things to Nix:

Multitasking while brushing

With every minute of almost everyday scheduled, time is precious. It’s tempting to do other things while you’re brushing. Weather you find yourself brushing while you dress the kids, or shower, scroll through your Twitter feed, try using those two minutes for brushing alone. When you stand in front of the mirror you are more likely to cover each surface of the tooth adequately, mapping out where you have covered and where needs better brushing.

Over-cleaning your toothbrush

Have you considered a way to sterilize or clean your toothbrush? There are recommendations

floating around to run toothbrushes through the dishwasher, zap it in the microwave, dip it in rubbing alcohol. Think again about all of these random options, the CDC says that there’s no evidence that anyone has ever gotten sick from using their own toothbrush. Instead try simply holding your toothbrush under running water from the tap, storing it upright and letting it air-dry with no other toothbrushes touching it. More drastic cleaning measures may damage your brush, and that defeats its purpose.

Using social media as your dentist

There are so many weird, whacky, (seemingly) wonderful cure alls on the web. When it comes to your health, including your oral health there are also many, many tips that can do more harm than help. So don’t even go there. The Pinterest, the google, and the various personal blogs sharing the latest and greatest ways to whiten teeth. Maybe—by swishing with straight peroxide, for example—one example that is really bad for teeth. Use ADA-approved products that have been tested.”

Ignoring your daily (or nightly) grind

see your qualified dentist if you have any symptoms of grinding your teeth.

see your qualified dentist if you have any symptoms of grinding your teeth.

While mild bruxism—that is, clenching your teeth or grinding your jaw—might not seem like a big deal, severe cases can lead to everything from chipped and worn teeth to headaches, jaw trouble, and even changes in facial appearance. It’s hard to know if you grind your teeth at night if a partner doesn’t tip you off, of course, but if you experience telltale signs such as jaw soreness or a dull, constant headache, make haste to the dentist; he or she will have several options to help eliminate this, often overlooked threat to your teeth and smile, not to mention your sleep.

So far we’ve just listed a few of the things you can eliminate and actually improve your dental health. Here are a few of the things to start doing immediately to improve your dental health.

Things to fix:

Start flossing

Skipping flossing leaves behind a significant amount of bacteria. The spaces between teeth and below the gum lines account for more than 40% of the surfaces that bacterial colonies attach to. Flossing every day, after brushing, improves gum health and significantly strengthens tooth attachment to the periodontal ligament.

Try a new old thing; tongue scrapers have been

around for generations.

Your tongue can host the majority of bad breath causing bacteria in your mouth

Your tongue can host the majority of bad breath causing bacteria in your mouth

A number of health benefits have been associated with the practice of tongue scraping. Everything from better tasting food, to improved immune response have been tied to tongue scraping after brushing. Tongue scrapers, typically look like a small curved device that is meant to gently curve over the back of the tongue and scrape of biological deposits and debris that can accumulate on the back of the tongue. It literally takes seconds to add this to your morning routine and can help remove bacterial colonies from the mouth that are responsible for causing bad breath.

 

By all means, keep doing what you’re doing when it comes to seeing your dentist routinely, brushing twice a day, drinking plenty of water, and eating all the fruits, vegetables, cheese, and other foods that help keep your teeth strong and healthy. Call our office so we can help you make sure you have the best possible smile.

Pearly Whites, Their Whitest

Pearly Whites, Their Whitest

The new year is looking brighter and whiter.

We all like to start off the new year refocusing on what’s important and dialing into priorities that may have gotten set aside in recent days. Many of us take inventory and realize that we are so busy taking care of our families and our careers that it’s no surprise that New Year tends to reinvigorate the desire to take better care of our own selves.

Cleaning up our diets, kicking up our physical fitness routines, and getting other affairs into order so we feel healthy, vital, organized, and ready to reach new levels of success.

While setting up parameters to uncover the new you don’t forget to include your teeth and getting the best and whitest smile you can!  With all the choices out there for brightening your smile you can be sure to find a method that works for you. After all, one thing that everybody would like, is whiter teeth.

The ADA (American Dental Association) strongly recommends that people go through in office dental whitening treatments, yet  many ways availe themselves to whiten your teeth at home. Methods of Teeth Whitening vary, here are a few: oil pulling at home, baking soda make-at-home-paste, dental strips, dental trays (often in kits), whitening pens, specialized toothpaste or washes, whitening kits, and in-office-dental procedures.

Teeth whitening strips: Lately teeth whitening strips have gained a lot of popularity. They are reasonable in cost and easy to use and usually very efficient. Strips are applied to teeth one to two times per day for a prescribed length of time. One drawback can be that patients may experience increased tooth sensitivity after each treatment or application.

Whitening paints: Whitening paints are not actual paint. They are effective based on the same mechanics that make traditional strips and trays work, a hydrogen peroxide product that but instead of a strip or tray that shields the product and keeps it on the teeth it is just painted onto the tooths surface and allowed to dry, then slowly dissolves rather than being removed. One drawback to paint, as tooth whiteners go, can be the inability to achieve uniform coverage, despite this paint on types of whiteners remain fairly popular.

Whitening toothpaste or mouthwash: This is by far the easiest method to whiten teeth. All you have to do is put some toothpaste on your brush or rinse your mouth with some whitening mouthwash. Though these two things have proven to be very slow in whitening the teeth, over time they are consistent and don’t require much hassle.

Make-at-home-whiteners: A quick search on the internet will yield a dozen methods to making at home whiteners. The most popular of these utilize baking soda and or hydrogen peroxide. Some methods are as simple as using coconut oil and the old fashioned technique of oil pulling that readily reduces yellowing and plaque growing bacteria. These various techniques can help remove yellowing that has accumulated due to staining but ultimately can cause some tooth sensitivity (especially if hydrogen peroxide is utilized) and usually yield only moderate results.

Above the rest whiteners

Chairside or in office Whiteners: Still considered the best way, as mentioned

Mouth and teeth before and after whitening

Mouth and teeth before and after whitening

above, is to get in house treatment. Through innovation and science the in office whiteners are the most specialized and easily protect teeth from issues with hypersensitivity. Dr. Marilyn K Jones, a well established dentist in Houston, provides teeth whitening chairside and can offer other options that you may want to try instead of in office. Additionally, many patients find it impressive how much discoloration and yellowing can be reversed just by starting with a routine dental cleaning.

Should you have any questions concerning teeth whitening through in house method or at home methods please feel free to give us a call for more information or an appointment.

Call our office now at (713) 785-7767 to schedule your next appointment. We look forward to meeting you and earning your trust.

Dentistry: Time To Go Natural

These days everyone wants to be a part of the growing trend to go all natural. Marketers have flooded television, newspaper, product names and PR campaigns with a barrage of information insisting that natural is the only way to go. There is a lot of good to come from getting food and personal care products, even home goods that are more natural and less chemicals, less processing and less artificial.

z-systems zirconia dental implants

ceramics used in dental implants are non-metallic and white throughout

Sometimes there are so many “natural” choices it can be hard to discern what is good and what might not be everything you need it to be. Especially in the world of dentistry. For example, ceramic implants cannot be touted as natural because they are definitely man made. Ceramic implants are made from a scientifically engineered material, derived from a naturally occurring metal ore that is so biologically compatible with the human body that it can pass for natural bone material. Other “natural” remedies, like fluoride can actually be derived from toxic industrial waste then passed off as natural all because a form of fluoride does exist in nature.

There are a variety of unique and healthy ways to utilize natural products to keep your teeth and gums healthy and thriving.  Everything from whitening teeth, remineralizing enamel, preventing cavities, bad breath, gum disease and stopping hypersensitivity can all be enhanced with natural products. Sometimes there are so many available products that it can be difficult to determine where to start and what will the best results.

Coconut oil and oil pulling can improve dental health

Coconut oil and oil pulling can improve dental health

While things like oil-pulling and coconut oil are obvious, easy options to include in your personal home care we may have other products and information about products that will further allow you to get more chemicals out of your household and body.  Maybe you will start with a natural toothpaste, maybe homemade toothpaste. For additional ideas on natural products and information about the ones you currently use call us, setup an appointment to learn more about how we can take care of your dental needs naturally using the best products and employing bio-compatibility and testing when needed to give you the healthiest, brightest and most natural oral health available.

What You Don’t Know About White Teeth

What You Don’t Know About White Teeth

A Myriad Of Culprits Contribute To The Everyday Dulling Of A Beautiful, White Smile

It’s not just the dread coffee responsible for staining your pearly whites and giving you a lackluster smile.

Dark Colored Foods and Drinks

These days everyone is obsessed with having the brightest, biggest, whitest smile. Considered common knowledge–most of us know–that certain foods will stain our teeth, especially if consumed often.  There are several that are particularly bad foods to watch out for in order to keep teeth white and bright.

Acidic Foods and Drinks

Surprise, did you know that foods high in acid are also responsible for yellowing and discoloring teeth? It’s not just the color of the foods and drinks you consume but the level of acidity as well. High acid levels soften the enamel coating on teeth leaving them susceptible to stains, soft and more likely to absorb colors in foods that stain teeth.

Why Yellow?

Thick, healthy enamel looks bright and white but really it’s slightly translucent, like fine china. As healthy enamel is worn away it becomes easier to see the dentin underneath. Dentin is the next layer of the tooth and it less white and more yellow. Thinner enamel, coupled with stains that seep into the pores of enamel can give teeth a yellow cast to them.

The Double Whammy List

Here’s a short list of foods that tend to be both dark in color and acidic making them the most likely to stain teeth.

  1. Black Tea. If you do drink black tea, avoid eating other foods with it that also have the potential to stain teeth, dark colored fruits or juices, basically anything that would stain clothing. The tannins in black tea are exceptionally good at increasing the way other foods colors can bond to enamel. Opt for Green Tea, it is considered not just a healthier option but also has less likelihood of staining teeth.
  2. Sugary Sweet, Sticky Treats. The longer sugar stays in your mouth the more time it has to work its mischief, so hard or chewy, those brightly colored drops of sweetness spell disaster for teeth. When you eat a candy that stains your tongue and lips a deep shade of red, blue, purple or green, guess what? Those same bright colors are also leeching into your enamel. Avoid the brightly colored hard and or chewy candies and go for a stick of sugar free gum, or even a small piece of dark chocolate instead.
    Greens can help coat teeth with a protective layer to stop other foods from staining your teeth.

    Greens can help coat teeth with a protective layer to stop other foods from staining your teeth.

  3. Curry and other Sauces. Some sauces are deeply colored by spices or tomatoes, they tend to have heavy concentrations of color and can be acidic as well equalling easy attachment to enamel, leaving dark stains over time.  Don’t avoid healthy foods but do consider two things that will help mitigate staining. a.) Drink less wine during a meal like this. Wine is acidic and will only increase the staining potential. b.) Eat your greens. Many vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, even onions–for example) and a variety of green leafy vegetables are known to coat the teeth in a protective layer helping to prevent staining and even bacterial colonization.
    Acids, not just tannins make teeth susceptible to staining. White wine stains teeth too.

    Acids, not just tannins make teeth susceptible to staining. White wine stains teeth too.

  4. Red and White Wine. It’s common knowledge that red wine will stain teeth, in fact it will stain just about everything, even rocks. The deeply colored polyphenols and tannins in red wine are responsible for its staining powers. Maybe it will be a surprise that white wines can stain teeth equally well, if not better. The acids and tannins in white wine give it super powers for staining your teeth. Avoid eating other foods that stain teeth at the same time you are enjoying a glass of white wine.
  5. Soda, colas, and sports drinks. Everything we just covered about wine plus sugar! It’s not tannins in cola that does your teeth in, its phosphoric acid, and the effect is staggering. Thinking of switching to a sports drink? Think again. Studies have shown some of the most popular sports drinks to have even higher levels of acid in them then the two leading brands of soda. Drink water. Consuming water actually helps flush out acids and correct pH plus it aids your body in making more slippery saliva and that is good news for healthy teeth and gums.
  6. Juice Drinks. Store bought, commercially packaged juice, marketed as healthy, has an even higher acid level (for preservation) than fresh squeezed juice. Buying processed juices, especially brightly colored ones, can be more of a staining hazard than most people realize. Freshly squeezed, made on the spot, juices aren’t processed, so there is less acid, more fiber, more vitamins and they are more healthy. You still don’t want them lingering on your teeth for an extended amount of time.  Swish around a sip of water when you finish just to clear out the acids and sugars left hanging out on and in between teeth.
  7. The Extras. Condiments like soy sauce, ketchup, balsamic vinegar and any other dark, acidic topping to your food, including some hot sauces and salsas can increase the likelihood of staining and yellowing teeth, particularly when paired with other richly colored foods than might impart more stains. This is another great time to reach for a tall glass of water. eating acidic foods or dark colored foods in combination with other foods and water can help dilute the effect and keep stain powers to a minimum.
    Polyphenols in brightly colored fruits and veggies are good for you...and stain teeth.

    Polyphenols in brightly colored fruits and veggies are good for you…and stain teeth.

  8. Richly Colored Fruits and Vegetables. Lastly, some of the most healthy foods can stain teeth because they are loaded with bright colors. The bright colors are a good indicator that they are loaded with super compounds known as polyphenols. Polyphenols are great for the body…hard on the teeth. Go ahead, eat your blueberries, your beets and your pomegranate. Eat all the blackberries you want and raspberries. Then go for some water. Sounding like a broken record?

You might be inclined to brush your teeth first but that’s a mistake. The acids in many of these foods tend to not just stain teeth but soften the enamel. It’s best to let enamel recover for at least an hour first then go in for the brushing with your soft bristled toothbrush. In the meantime, a cool glass of water and a little swish between teeth is the best first move to make. Water will dilute and neutralize strong acids and deep colors to help minimize the risk of staining teeth.

If your teeth have staining or discoloration we can help restore a bright smile giving you that confident feeling with every smile and helping your teeth stay their healthy best.

The Code of Tooth Sensitivity

The Code of Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth Sensitivity

Sharp or subtle, when teeth become sensitive to the foods you eat or drink, even the activity of your day it affects your quality of life. It also may be affecting your health.  A variety of circumstances can lead to tooth sensitivity, all of them indicating that its time to do something different. From serious likelihood of infection to simple remineralization this article can help you determine what actions to start with.  bigstock-Face-full-of-pain-51688675

Teeth Are Alive

Teeth are alive, each tooth with it’s own nutrifying blood source, it’s own dedicated nerve and a living ligament to keep it anchored into the jaw bone. For this reason each tooth has the potential to cause you a significant amount of pain if something goes amiss. Think of tooth sensitivity as a red flag, a warning signal, your teeth’s way to communicate with the rest of the body when something is wrong.

Your teeth have several defenses to the help protect and keep them healthy. Below the gum line there is the periodontal ligament and the jawbone, these, paired with the gums themselves are essential to keeping teeth healthy, and alive. They provide protection, ensure healthy blood supply and encapsulate over half of the tooth to provide strength and leverage for chewing and biting. That slippery stuff known as saliva plays another huge role in keeping teeth clean, healthy, strong and alive.  Then there is the layer of enamel on the outside of the tooth, enamel also provides strength and bears the burden of being the last line of defense. The stronger your enamel the better teeth can fend off attacks from bacteria and decay, enamel even buffers the effects wear and tear.

anatomy of a healthy tooth

A Variety of Causes For Tooth Sensitivity

Triggering tooth sensitivity with a sip of a hot drink, a bite of cold ice cream, sometimes just breathing in fresh air or biting into something sweet is no fun, while getting at the cause can be a bit tricky, many people find it reassuring that tooth sensitivity is fixable. Here are some of the most common related types of tooth sensitivity:

  • Sinus problems can make teeth hurt, ache or become sensitive. Pressure in the maxillary sinus just above the jaw bone can push down into the jaw bone and surrounding nerves causing inflammation in surrounding tissues, including the nerve tissues of your teeth.
  • Orthodontic work can also make teeth ache, and become sensitive as the teeth and periodontal ligaments are adjusted to their proper alignment.

While the previous causes of tooth sensitivity may not require the attention of your dentist, the next few warrant a call and an appointment as soon as possible

  • Infections in the root of a tooth also make teeth hypersensitive to sensation, including hot, cold, sweet and sour, you may not be able to see anything wrong on the tooth or in the mouth.
  • Abscesses and periodontal infections tend to be associated with a lot of pain, not just sensitivity to hot or cold. There can, however be just deep sensitivity, especially at the initial onset of infection.
  • Cavities. or decay in the tooth itself, can cause tooth sensitivity especially when a cavity is still new and has not fully infected the root.
  • Several teeth hurting in one localized area of the mouth can be from;
    • Infection, as bacteria multiply and invade surrounding tissues the infection can spread, additionally as infection compounds–or gets worse–the blood supply to healthy tissue becomes compromised thus aiding in the spread of the infection as healthy tissues die.
    • Injury, in the instance of a broken tooth or a tooth loosened from trauma, may allow surrounding tissues to become inflamed.  The nerve or nerves (if several nearby teeth are also disturbed) become over stimulated and begin sending alarms to the brain that things are in need of repair.
    • teeth grinding or bruxism can cause localized sensitivity or even pain. Clenching or grinding the teeth–usually at night or while sleeping–can crack, fracture or even break teeth. The cracks and fissures can cause sensitivity as the enamel can no longer properly protect the nerve inside the tooth. Because of the irregular bite and tooth alignment in some mouths, it is possible to have one area of the mouth affected more than other parts of the mouth.
    • Failing dental work. If you have fillings, bridges, crowns or other dental work and the teeth involved or surrounding teeth are sensitive or hurting it could mean your dental work is failing.

So far all of the circumstances we have covered are situations that you may have little control to “fixing” by yourself. While there may be a few other causes of tooth sensitivity the ones in this article are the most typical and the last reason is, by far, one of the most common. Thankfully it is one that you can improve the symptoms of, even sometimes eliminating tooth sensitivity all together.

Sensitive Teeth

Sensitive Teeth

  • Thin, weak, and worn out tooth enamel is the most common cause of sensitive teeth. Your teeth are formed with a dense, strong coating of enamel. As you age, chewing, various foods, and the things you drink wear down and even soften the enamel making it thinner and more porous. Thereby allowing the delicate nerve inside to be over stimulated. Dentist once believed that there was very little to do if tooth enamel began to fail. Modern dentistry has better been able to definitively determine factors that can aid in remineralization of enamel weakened or worn out.
    • There are foods and diets that aid in remineralization.
    • Oil pulling can increase the enamels ability to absorb good minerals and improve the natural balance of your saliva while reducing pathogens.
    • Homemade toothpaste, the best of which employ added minerals, can not only whiten teeth but add needed minerals to reinforce and help fill in overly porous enamel, eventually leading to diminished tooth sensitivity.

For more information on tooth sensitivity click on the links throughout the article or call our office to talk with a specialist today. At Marilyn K Jones Dentisty, we have the skills, experience, and expertise you need to ensure a healthy mouth and teeth.  Call or visit today: Marilyn K Jones DDS, (713).785.7767 and at mjones@hal-pc.org.