Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Eliminate the Triggers of Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth Sensitivity Triggers are varied, and many are avoidable

Not so uncommon to experience tooth sensitivity at least once. Most people have tooth sensitive many times in a life time. Surprisingly, many triggers are diet related. Certain foods exacerbate tooth sensitivity, while others can help quell the problem.

How you brush counts

Too much brushing or excessive tooth brushing can result in gum recession, thinned dentine, and overall inflammation. Brushing teeth after meals or at least morning and night. Using a soft bristled tooth brush for about two minutes (or 30 seconds per quadrant of the mouth.) follow brushing by flossing once a day, for ideal time frames relating to hygiene at home.

Water picks are also useful at dislodging debris from hard to reach spots in the mouth and definitely do not add to irritation or inflammation that may already exist.

Dental work can trigger tooth sensitivity

Many dental procedures keep teeth and gums healthy, cleanings with a professional are vital to long term tooth and gum health. The draw back is that cleanings, because of their nature, stimulate nerves in the teeth. Sometimes the scaling, cleaning and polishing can excite the nerves inside a tooth and cause temporary sensitivity.

Other dental procedures that can cause tooth sensitivity are teeth whitening procedures, fillings, dental repairs, and braces installations. Even some types of mouthwash, especially used multiple times.

How you sleep counts

Grinding teeth while sleeping can wear away dentine, cause cracks, fractures and micro fissures. Any one of those leave teeth vulnerable. When dentine is breached through wear, or fractures and cracks it exposes the sensitive nerve inside the tooth via microscopic tubes in the teeth.

Diet counts

Acidic foods and sugary food can trigger food sensitivity, especially if dentine is thin or worn.  Cold and hot foods are the other food culprits to tooth sensitivity. Avoiding these foods can diminish the number of triggers your teeth are exposed to daily.

Eating foods the help remineralizing teeth can also diminish reactions from foods.

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

Flossing for Results

Flossing for Results

Does daily flossing effectively reduce cavities, gum disease or gingivitis?

You’re flossing. Great. Is it actually doing any good?

Amidst dozens of studies, data in favor of flossing can be hard to find, yet dentists still highly favor the practice. Careful analysis of previous studies indicate that many variables potentially influence the final result. Participants used varying methods, inconsistent technique and consistent length of flossing tended to vary a great deal.

Definitively, when trained hygienist performed flossing, outcomes were proven in several studies, demonstrating that the issues with flossing are likely due to user error and not proof that the practice has merit.

What you really need to know

How To Use Dental Floss

For dental floss to effectively remove plaque from your teeth, you need to be sure you’re using the correct technique. Because you’ll be putting your fingers into your mouth, be sure to wash your hands before you reach for the floss. Then just follow these steps:

  • Use enough floss.
    1. Break off a piece about 18 inches long.
    2. That sounds like a lot, but you want enough to keep a clean segment in place as you move from tooth to tooth.
    3. Wrap most of the floss around either the middle finger or the index finger of one hand, whichever you prefer, and a small amount onto the middle or index finger of the other hand.
    4. (Using the middle finger leaves your index finger free to manipulate the floss.)
  • Slide between teeth.
    1. Gently slide the floss between the teeth in a zigzag motion
    2. and be careful not to let the floss snap or “pop” between teeth.
  • Form a “C”.
    1. Make a C shape with the floss as you wrap it around the tooth.
    2. Then carefully pull the floss upward from the gum line to the top of the tooth.
    3. Roll along.
    4. As you move from one tooth to the next, unroll a fresh section of floss from the finger of one hand while rolling the used floss onto the finger of the other hand.
    5. Use your thumb as a guide.
  • Reach both sides.
    1. Don’t forget to floss the back side of each tooth.

As long as you use the correct technique, the type of floss you use is a matter of personal preference. There are many types to choose from, and you can even choose a variety of types to meet your needs and those of your family members. Either way, using the correct technique will help you remove the excess food particles and plaque buildup between your teeth and help improve your oral health.

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Laser surgery in dentistry

Sci-Fi has become reality and lasers are becoming readily utilized in many different medical applications. Dentistry is no exception.  For you, the patient, this means improved healing times, increased accuracy in treated areas, and best of all, reduced pain due to procedures. For dentist it means greater precision, increased patient compliance and ultimately better over all health and better outcomes for patients.

Lasers are not new in dental medicine but their applications are continually expanding.  Lightwalker lasers, used at Dr. Marilyn K. Jones, have been leading the way in advancements for almost five decades, in precision, performance, consistency, and overall perfection.

Dentists have been using special lasers in dental treatments for 4 decades. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. The light from dental lasers can be used to vaporize tissue, cut tissue, harden and enforce a bond between a filler and the remaining tooth, stop bleeding, cut away tissue or aid in whitening teeth. The precision offered with such an advanced laser is unequalled.

Why Lightwalker Lasers are Special

New innovations in surgical lasers are bringing new solutions for patients and doctors. Lasers quickly and painlessly treat a myriad of oral conditions with improved healing, improved accuracy, and less overall invasiveness. Lightwalker Fotona lasers are so accurate and reliable they can be successfully used for very delicate procedures and very specialized procedures. Used to treat some types of decay or cavities, used in gum surgery, hard and soft tissue applications, for treating gum disease and surgical, even for a nonsurgical treatment and throat anomalies — especially those related to sleep apnea. Procedures that once were invasive, with long healing times are now nominally invasive, and have a much faster healing time, with much less trauma to sensitive oral tissue.

The Benefits of our Lightwalker Fotona Dental Lasers for oral laser surgery and other procedures Include:

  • A full range of hard- and soft-tissue treatments
  • Extremely precise hard-tissue cutting and ablation
  • Easy and effective endodontic treatments
  • Little or no bleeding surgical procedures, with simultaneous disinfection
  • Easy-to-select operating modes for greater simplicity
  • Greater patient satisfaction and less operator fatigue
  • Excellent training and support for medical staff
  • Do You Need Oral Surgery or Have Sleep Apnea?

Contact our office and we can schedule you for a quick consultation to see if our surgical dental lasers can treat or help remedy your dental, oral, or sleep apnea related problems.

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

Cold and flu tax your oral health too

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  1. Dry Mouth:
    • Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity.
    • The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes.
    • Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier.
      • Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth,
      • And bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  2. Cough Drops and Medications:
    • Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet.
    • Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
      To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them. Stay adequately hydrated.
  3. Fatigue:
    • Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus.
    • Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices.
    • Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis.
    • Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

Zenith of the Toothbrush and ultrasonic Brushes

Zenith of the Toothbrush and ultrasonic Brushes

Have you ever considered the history of the modern toothbrush?

We have all benefited from the advent of the modern toothbrush. What came before the modern toothbrush?  A lot more rotting teeth!  In fact regardless of fluoride, countries across the globe that employ modern dentistry and routine dental care have all recorded progressively lower rates of decay and tooth loss over the last 100 years.

The toothbrush in your bathroom cabinet (especially a sonic toothbrush) is the culmination of not just revision after revision, science and engineering has brought forth the best version ergonomically, hygienically and scientifically to clean and deter further bacterial colonization and plaque build up on your pearly whites.

The First Toothbrushes

Bearing in mind that people have always had teeth, it may not be surprising that we’ve been attempting to keep them clean and healthy for a very long time. The toothbrushes predecessor, the chew stick, have been unearthed in various places around the globe. The oldest chew stick, found in Babylonia and dated to 3500 BC, followed by archeological evidence in Egypt dating to about 3000 BC.

Chew Stick or teeth cleaning sticks.

Chew Stick or teeth cleaning sticks.

Chew sticks-ancient toothbrushes-were a stick that, tapered on one end and frayed on the other end. The soft frayed ends were used to gently clean the surfaces. The opposing end was pointed and could be used to dislodge debris stuck in the teeth crevices and cracks.

A variety of trees or bushes could be employed to make chew sticks.  Different regions and cultures each, had their own prefered bush or tree, sometimes cinnamon, sassafras or even tea tree and walnut. Well over a dozen different types of trees/bushes with bitter roots were utilized for chew sticks, or teeth cleaning sticks.  The types of trees and bushes typically selected for teeth cleaning or chew sticks have long been known to have antimicrobial benefits that no doubt benefited the user to some degree.

Eventually the chew stick evolved into a bristled brush similar to our more modern toothbrushes. The first of which have been unearthed in ancient China.  The Toothbrush made it’s way across the globe and while the handles varied between bamboo, ivory and bone, the bristles on those first toothbrushes were generally made from horse-tail hairs, boar bristles, even badger fur. By the 1900’s modern handles made from man made materials were the norm and nylon bristles were standard.

The Zenith of the Toothbrush

Over the last hundred years or so the toothbrush has changed but is still recognizable from even its earliest versions. The biggest difference in the latest models are those brushes that offer ultrasonic cleaning speeds.  We easily assume that this feature is but a mere gimmick, yet by far, this is the pinnacle of hundreds of years of reinventing and researching oral health. Today’s ultra-sonic toothbrushes–outfitted with a new toothbrush head and properly charged–remove stains, debris and colonies of bacteria both above and below the gumline. Ultrasonic toothbrushes may even contribute in retarding harmful anaerobic bacteria.

Ultrasonic toothbrushes can make brushing teeth even more efficient

As ultrasonic toothbrushes are moved from tooth to tooth they create thousands of teeny-tiny bubbles, some that may be small enough to slip into the tiny space between the teeth and gums. Those little bubble are all it takes to break up the party of nasty anaerobic bacteria hanging out down below the gumline. Anaerobic bacteria can be some of the stinkiest and contribute, extensively, to periodontal disease, gum disease, decay and other oral infection.

By now you’re probably day dreaming about a nice rendezvous with your new, modern, toothbrush!

Contact our office weather you still use a chew stick or even if you have the fanciest, latest version–the ultrasonic toothbrush–we can help you make sure your oral health and your whole health are in alignment.

When Good Gums Go Bad

When Good Gums Go Bad

When good gums go bad, Periodontitis…

Logic tells you that you can’t have healthy teeth without first having healthy gums. Our gums serve to protect the base of the teeth, where connective tissue anchors them to jawbone. Left untreated, gum problems can lead to tooth and bone loss. Knowing what you can do to keep your gums healthy will help you preserve not only your smile, but your overall good health as well.

What is gingivitis?

Gingivitis occurs in the mouth as bacteria begin to build up in tiny pockets along the gum line, resulting inflammation. Early symptoms include bleeding when brushing and persistent bad breath. Gingivitis, which, in most cases, is treatable and managed with good oral care practices, accounts for about 70 percent of gum disease, while the more persistent form called periodontitis makes up the remaining 30 percent.

The warning signs of gum disease can include:

  • tooth brushing causes bleeding gums
  • gums are red, swollen or tender to the touch
  • gums appear to be pulled away from the teeth
  • bad breath
  • pus between the teeth and gums
  • teeth appear to be loosening
  • a change in your bite

Gingivitis happens when teeth are neglected, causing a buildup of oral plaque. This thin, sticky film is primarily made up of bacteria. Plaque that remains on the surface of teeth for prolonged periods without being brushed away will then harden under the gum line turning into what dentists call tartar or calculus. At this stage the buildup is much more difficult – if not impossible – to brush away, ultimately creating a closed environment under the gums in which bacteria can thrive.

Plaque leads to gingivitis, gingivitis leads to periodontitis

The plaque that causes gingivitis lies at or above the gum line is called supragingival plaque. This type of plaque can become covered by inflamed gum tissue or otherwise spread below the gum line and once that happens it is called subgingival plaque. Once tartar has formed below the gum line the only effective way to remove it is through a technique called scaling, scale, or planing using an instrument to clean under the gum margins – (where a dental healthcare provider works to remove the tartar by scraping it away with specially designed instruments). However, if dental plaque and tartar remain untreated at this point, the gums will become progressively more irritated and inflamed, resulting in the more serious condition called periodontitis.

Ugly periodontitis

Periodontitis happens when oral bacteria have built up over time and begun to invade the underlying bone that normally anchors the teeth in place. At this point, the gums may recede, exposing the delicate root surfaces, causing increasing sensitivity to heat and cold at the least, and tooth and bone loss at the most.

Symptoms of periodontitis may include:

  • Receding gums
  • Visible pockets of inflammation at the gum line
  • Gum soreness and pain
  • Extreme sensitivity to temperature changes

By the time people have begun to notice any of the warning signs of periodontitis, it is often too late to reverse the damage. That’s why regular dental checkups are so important. During routine exams dentists are able to spot pockets of inflammation or places where gum tissue has become damaged, exposing the root of the tooth. Dental X-rays can also reveal early signs of gum disease.

Stopping gum disease early may be more important than you think

According to a growing body of clinical research trials and studies, catching signs of gum disease early and effectively treating it, may be far more important than you might imagine as these studies indicate that advanced periodontal disease can cause other, even more serious chronic health problems as well.

Prevention and Treatment of Gum Disease

Some of the well-known basics of good oral healthcare include;

  • Brushing least twice a day
  • Rinsing vigorously (with water) after each meal
  • Floss daily
  • Don’t smoke

Managing Periodontitis

Periodontitis is a condition that needs to be managed carefully due to the inflammation that has already invaded below the gum line which, of course requires immediate care from a dentist followed by aggressive and consistent home care. Once treatment has begun, committing to a practice of good dental care will help reduce your risk of further inflammation and damage. Your dentist may also recommend more frequent checkups to monitor and ensure future gum health.

Following a healthy diet can also help create a healthy oral environment and maintain healthy gums. New research suggests that a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids found in fatty fish (herring, salmon, sardines, trout, tuna,) fish oil and flaxseed helps to reduces inflammation. Adopting a practice of oil pulling using coconut oil may also lead to long term healthy gums. Supplements that support oral health can also be suggested by your dentist.

More information:

What Is Gum Disease? What Is Gingivitis? What Causes Gingivitis? http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/167727.php

Periodontitis http://www.healthcentral.com/encyclopedia/408/254.html & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodontitis

Preventing and Treating Gum Problems http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/gums-problems-gingivitis?page=2

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Get and Keep A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Your smile says a lot about you, not simply that you are confident or vivacious. Your smile can be a window to your overall health. Healthy gums support healthy teeth. If you have neglected to care for your gums and teeth, you may experience swollen, bleeding, even receding gums or loose teeth. Bad breath, or an unpleasant taste in your mouth may also plague you. All of these things can be a sign of gum disease.

Your To-Do List for a healthy smile

  • Don’t miss regular check-ups. An integral component of getting and maintaining healthy gums (the key to a lifelong healthy smile) is keeping plaque from accumulating on your teeth.  The sticky film, plaque, is produced when sugars and starches in food are metabolized by bacteria within the mouth. Plaque builds up between teeth and below the gumline around teeth. Eventually plaque causes inflammation and swelling. Left alone this will result in a deterioration of the bone and structures that hold teeth in place. Evidence suggests that gum disease may share a link with increased likelihood of systemic disease such as diabetes and heart disease.
  • Brush and Floss your teeth. Brushing and flossing remove food debris that bacteria use to thrive in the mouth. Fighting plaque is a constant battle as it starts to reaccumulate just hours after brushing. Brushing, including the tongue twice a day and flossing one time a day helps keep food particles from building up in the mouth. While flossing has been met with some recent controversy, experts say that flossing once a day difinitively removes particles between teeth and below gums that would otherwise feed plaque causing bacteria. Beware that smoking or chewing tobacco, stress, poor nutrition, substance abuse, diabetes, hormonal fluctuations, and certain medications can add to the risk of gum disease developing.
  • Drink and eat wisely. Water consumption adds to saliva. Slippery saliva helps keep bacteria and food from sticking to teeth. Eating whole, unprocessed foods–apples, salads, berries, pears, nuts, carrots, celery, for example–also help fortify and scrub teeth clean. Other foods like onion, cheese, and yogurt have other positive attributes from inhibiting halitosis causing bacteria, to contributing to remineralizing enamel.

Disease Progression

Gum disease has several stages, all of which gradually break down and steal a healthy smile

The mildest stage of gum disease, gingivitis, results from poor or inconsistent oral hygiene.  Gingivitis is a treatable and reversible form of gum disease. Gingivitis occurs when plaque accumulates and hardens over time. The chronic inflammation and bacterial process eventually break down and damage surrounding soft tissues. In order to properly treat gingivitis your dentist will clean the affected areas and remove plaque, depending on how significant the deposits of plaque are this stage could potentially be uncomfortable.

If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontitis. Periodontitis, a more serious condition in which the bacteria in the mouth trigger a systemic immune response. The entire immune system kicks in to try and fight the substantial bacteria load inside the mouth. This progressive disease process can lead to damage jaw bone and connective tissue around the teeth.

Protect you healthy smile with daily maintenance and regular check-ups. You will be rewarded for your consistent efforts.

 

 

 

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Can you sleep your way to a better smile? 

Grandma called it beauty sleep and you shrugged, even rolled your eyes but recent research shows that adequate sleep can hold off and slow down the effects of stress, age and all kinds of wear and tear on the body, even help with weight loss, but did you know it is also one of the greatest factors to having and keeping a beautiful smile? Getting a good night’s rest can do a lot more than preserve your good looks.

Studies can link a relationship of good sleeping habits to better heart health, lower blood pressure, and decreased incidence of diabetes, now add to that list improved gum and mouth health.  To thousands who suffer from periodontal disease, at any stage, that signals good news.

The Link Between Sleep and Oral Health 

Reduce inflammation with adequate sleep to improve oral health and get a beautiful smile.

Reduce inflammation with sleep to improve oral health

The less sleep you get per night relates to the onset of periodontitis–a disease in which deep pockets form between the teeth and gums, leading to loose and shifting teeth, and the destruction of the bone and connective tissue which hold teeth in place.

A study at the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine examined over 200 factory workers to assess whether various lifestyle factors (i.e. exercise, diet, stress) had an effect on periodontitis. Throughout the four year-study, researchers used periodontal probes to monitor any changes in the pockets between teeth and gums.

According to the findings, workers who slept seven to eight hours per night were had a lower risk for periodontitis than those who slept less than six hours per night.  In fact, sleep deprivation was the second most influential factor associated with the onset of periodontitis, right behind smoking.

Lack of Sleep and Inflammation

The root of this association is most likely inflammation. Sleep deprivation is a known cause of increased inflammation, which in turn is a risk factor for other serious diseases like heart disease and stroke.

Research at the Emory University School of Medicine found that, when you are sleep deprived, there is an increased production of inflammatory hormones.  One such inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein, was 25% higher in subjects who had less than six hours of sleep per night.

In addition to being a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, inflammation is also a sign of gingivitis, the mild form of gum disease that can lead to periodontitis.

Get A Good Night’s Sleep

It’s not how long, but how well you sleep that counts too.  Even if you get a full eight hours each night, you don’t get the same health benefits if you wake up often.

A few tips for those that have trouble getting a good night’s rest:

Routine: Your body clock wants to adjust to your needs, but it cannot adjust if those needs are always changing. Establishing a routine alerts the body that this is the time you need to go to sleep.

Wind-down without your electronics: Giving yourself time to wind-down before you sleep helps your mind relax. There are many different ways to wind-down, whether it’s reading, yoga, or sipping a cup of hot tea. Just be sure not to use electronics. The latest research shows that artificial light from laptops, TV’s, and iPhones suppress the hormone which regulates sleep, melatonin.

Get up instead of tossing and turning: You want to keep your bedroom associated with sleep rather than being awake. So if you are tossing and turning, get up and do a relaxing activity until you feel tired again. Then try and go back to sleep.

To offset some of the inevitable lack of sleep when things get way too busy and remember to:

More Than Brushing: Answers to Bad Breath

More Than Brushing: Answers to Bad Breath

Bad Breath doesn’t discriminate

Ever notice a friend turning away, even while you retell the best parts of your weekend? Of course we have all experienced bad breath and like a lot of people, the first reaction to resolving the problem; up our dental dental hygiene game. Brushing and flossing are key to a healthy mouth that smells fresh and clean but you don’t need to brush after every meal, floss multiple times and use swimming pool amounts of mouthwash to keep from offending friends with halitosis (bad breath).

If you’be been haunted or plagued with chronic, smelly, bad breath, or have that bitter, nasty, morning breath taste in the back of your throat on a regular basis there may be more to it than just oral hygiene.

First you need to tackle the obvious contributors;

  • Get your teeth cleaned by your dentist and hygienist consistently one or more times per year according to your dentist recommendation. This will eliminate contributions to bad breath from pockets of bacterial colonies and decay.
  • Brush with a regularly replaced, soft bristled toothbrush twice a day.
  • Floss all of your teeth once a day.
  • Consider using a tongue scrapper to take one last measure to eliminating bacteria and odor causing detris in your mouth. The bonus is you may start smelling and tasting better than ever before, plus-no bad breath!
  • Drink plenty of water. Water is what hydrates the body and a well hydrated bodies ensure lots of healthy saliva. Lots of saliva helps wash away the bacterium that typically cause gingivitis, plaque, and yes, bad breath.

Next address dietary contributors;

  • Obvious contributors to smelly breath like onion, garlic, that extra frothy latte, are easy to identify and hard to say no to, if you must indulge, brush or follow with gum or breath mints.
  • Eat a varied, healthful diet. Diets especially low in carbohydrates can contribute to bad breath, so excluding foods that can cause inflammation, but adding in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables and healthy proteins like nuts or cheese can help mitigate bad breath caused when body chemistry is not ideal.

Sweep your environment for other culprits;

  • Literally keeping things as tidy and clean as possible can reduce the potential for allergies. Allergies are a big contributor to rhinitis that can contribute to post nasal drip and major halitosis. If your nose gets stuffy, you breath through your mouth a lot, you may have allergy related bad breath.
    • Keeping dust to a minimum, using air filters, especially hepa filters to get the cleanest air inside your living space.
  • Introduce a humidifier. Humidifiers can improve the moisture content of air and reduce inflammation in mucus membranes inside the mouth, throat and nose, all of which will help keep the body best able to tackle the kinds of bacteria and inflammation that can cause stinky breath.
  • Many people also find that flushing their sinuses with a neti pot, daily, significantly reduces pollutants, pollens and other irritants that add to the kind of sinusitis underlying in many cases of chronic sinusitis.

There are other reasons for long term, recurring bad breath that can be related to conditions you may need to see a doctor for. Cracks in teeth, cavities, deviated septums, loose dental restorations, even allergies to the dental restorations you currently have are included in the list of potential culprits. If you have addressed all of the above problems and bad breath persist, call us today for an exam to help you get to the root of the issue. No one should have to live with the uncomfortable embarrassment and stigma that goes along with long term, chronic bad breath.

Don’t forget that alcohol, smoking, some prescription drugs and illnesses can cause bad breath all on their own despite other measures you take to get rid of it.