Multi-Visit procedures -vs- Single Day Procedures

Multi-Visit procedures -vs- Single Day Procedures

Ceramic Implants Done with Best Potential Outcome
Multi-visit placement vs single day placement

You’ve done your research. Deciding on the very best, you are getting a ceramic (or zirconia) implant. This is the best option for you. Ceramic implants, far and away, are the best looking, strongest, and most natural option for tooth replacement. Any concerns about longevity or durability have been put to rest since ceramic options can last as long as natural, healthy, teeth. Add to that how much ceramic implants actually increase the viability and vitality of your whole mouth in comparison to other replacement options and the choice was made for you.

You may be considering your options for the restorative procedure itself. There are dentists who will do an implant in one day, many however, prefer several visits to complete the implant process. You might wonder if it matters.

The promise of instant gratification and less planning or scheduling has you considering if it really makes a difference in the outcome. It’s comforting to hope that such a big procedure could be over and done in a single day. That may be part of the reason single day visits are offered. We are programmed to go looking for the easy button, instant gratification.

Word of warning:

The science and research indicates one major factor contributting to implant failure is not allowing time for bone and soft tissues to heal before completing the procedure.

Do your mouth a favor and give it the proper time to heal.

A ceramic implant is anchored in the jaw bone. Depending on several factors, including the number of teeth to be restored and the quality and quantity of jaw bone, you may be able to start with the initial procedure being the anchor itself. In some instances there may be recommended procedures to do prior to implanting the anchor in order to ensure proper bone mass and health. Afterwards the anchor is given adequate time for the bone around it to heal and be strongly attached. There may be a follow up exam to confirm this. The next step is placing a new, ceramic, fixed, permanent tooth.

Most implant procedures are very predictable and your skilled dentist can make the entire procedure nearly effortless. It’s worth the wait to know you’ve got the most advanced, successful system. You are investing time to ensure the best outcome, giving yourself the best odds of a restoration that will last your entire life and look great doing it. Lets face it, this was no small decision and you should know, you’ve done your research. When you come in to see us we will be happy to work with you to find the best time and availability to fit your schedule.

The entire process requires very specialized, advanced equipment and training. We have the training, the expertise and are ready to give you the smile you deserve. While in our care all aspects of your overall health will be taken into consideration, your comfort, health, convenience, investment and satisfaction matter to us.

Dental Lasers Reinvent Proceedures

Dental Lasers Reinvent Proceedures

Lasers and laser surgery in dentistry

Learn how lasers reduce pain, increase healing times, increase patient compliance, and ultimately, with the best machines and practitioners, give greater precision.

Dental Lasers aren’t new but the applications and the precision continues to make heady improvements. Lightwalker lasers, used at Dr. Marilyn K. Jones, have been leading the way in advancements for almost five decades, in precision, performance, consistency, and overall perfection.

Since the 1990’s dentists have been using special lasers in dental treatments. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. The light from dental lasers can be used to vaporize tissue, cut tissue, harden and enforce a bond between a filler and the remaining tooth, even to stop bleeding, cut away tissue or aid in whitening teeth.

Why Lightwalker Lasers are Special

New innovations in surgical lasers are bringing viable solutions for patients and doctors. Lasers quickly and painlessly treat a myriad of oral conditions with improved healing, improved accuracy, and less overall invasiveness. Lightwalker Fotona lasers are so accurate and reliable they can be successfully used for very delicate procedures and very specialized procedures. Used to treat some types of decay or cavities, used in gum surgery, hard and soft tissue applications, for treating gum disease and even for a nonsurgical treatment and throat anomalies and sleep apnea. Procedures that once were invasive, with long healing times are now nominally invasive, and have a much faster healing time, with much less trauma to sensitive oral tissue.

The Benefits of our Lightwalker Fotona Dental Lasers for oral laser surgery and other procedures Include:

  • A full range of hard- and soft-tissue treatments
  • Extremely precise hard-tissue cutting and ablation
  • Easy and effective endodontic treatments
  • Little or no bleeding surgical procedures, with simultaneous disinfection
  • Easy-to-select operating modes for greater simplicity
  • Greater patient satisfaction and less operator fatigue
  • Excellent training and support for medical staff
  • Do You Need Oral Surgery or Have Sleep Apnea?

Contact our office and we can schedule you for a quick consultation to see if our surgical dental lasers can treat or help remedy your dental, oral, or sleep apnea related problems.

Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and flu viruses affect your oral health

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  • Dry Mouth: Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity. The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes. Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier. Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages also dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth, and bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  • Cough Drops and Medications: Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet. Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
    • To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them.  Stay adequately hydrated.
  • Fatigue: Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus. Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices. Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis. Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

 

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

There might be a toxic trap inside your dental work

Toxins trapped inside the body, swirl around in your immune system and potentially trigger an immune response. Inflammation and infection left alone, can wreak havoc on organs and tissues and compromise an otherwise healthy body. Most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body. Poisonous, also it’s gross. 

Trapping dead, dying and bacterial colonies inside the body happen when a root canal is performed. A root canal is a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to stay alive. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised. Now the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth can abscess, continuing to decay. This decay potentially affects surrounding teeth. An affected tooth may also fall out, leading to additional problems.

The truth about root canals

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth. Blood vessel nourishing the tooth, the nerve, and pulp are extracted. Chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. The chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the new hole as possible. This process kills any remaining, viable or nonviable, rotting tissue.Essentially an embalming process for what remains of soft tissues inside the tooth.

We know after decades of research and thousands of patients that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue gets left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeates surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas. Those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues may become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As medical news around this potential hazard develops, many dentist are adopting new solutions to  addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

Due Diligence

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended–and you’re worried about a toxic trap inside your mouth–come see our team. Get all of your options. Our team can give you healthy, attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Get and Keep A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Your smile says a lot about you, not simply that you are confident or vivacious. Your smile can be a window to your overall health. Healthy gums support healthy teeth. If you have neglected to care for your gums and teeth, you may experience swollen, bleeding, even receding gums or loose teeth. Bad breath, or an unpleasant taste in your mouth may also plague you. All of these things can be a sign of gum disease.

Your To-Do List for a healthy smile

  • Don’t miss regular check-ups. An integral component of getting and maintaining healthy gums (the key to a lifelong healthy smile) is keeping plaque from accumulating on your teeth.  The sticky film, plaque, is produced when sugars and starches in food are metabolized by bacteria within the mouth. Plaque builds up between teeth and below the gumline around teeth. Eventually plaque causes inflammation and swelling. Left alone this will result in a deterioration of the bone and structures that hold teeth in place. Evidence suggests that gum disease may share a link with increased likelihood of systemic disease such as diabetes and heart disease.
  • Brush and Floss your teeth. Brushing and flossing remove food debris that bacteria use to thrive in the mouth. Fighting plaque is a constant battle as it starts to reaccumulate just hours after brushing. Brushing, including the tongue twice a day and flossing one time a day helps keep food particles from building up in the mouth. While flossing has been met with some recent controversy, experts say that flossing once a day difinitively removes particles between teeth and below gums that would otherwise feed plaque causing bacteria. Beware that smoking or chewing tobacco, stress, poor nutrition, substance abuse, diabetes, hormonal fluctuations, and certain medications can add to the risk of gum disease developing.
  • Drink and eat wisely. Water consumption adds to saliva. Slippery saliva helps keep bacteria and food from sticking to teeth. Eating whole, unprocessed foods–apples, salads, berries, pears, nuts, carrots, celery, for example–also help fortify and scrub teeth clean. Other foods like onion, cheese, and yogurt have other positive attributes from inhibiting halitosis causing bacteria, to contributing to remineralizing enamel.

Disease Progression

Gum disease has several stages, all of which gradually break down and steal a healthy smile

The mildest stage of gum disease, gingivitis, results from poor or inconsistent oral hygiene.  Gingivitis is a treatable and reversible form of gum disease. Gingivitis occurs when plaque accumulates and hardens over time. The chronic inflammation and bacterial process eventually break down and damage surrounding soft tissues. In order to properly treat gingivitis your dentist will clean the affected areas and remove plaque, depending on how significant the deposits of plaque are this stage could potentially be uncomfortable.

If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontitis. Periodontitis, a more serious condition in which the bacteria in the mouth trigger a systemic immune response. The entire immune system kicks in to try and fight the substantial bacteria load inside the mouth. This progressive disease process can lead to damage jaw bone and connective tissue around the teeth.

Protect you healthy smile with daily maintenance and regular check-ups. You will be rewarded for your consistent efforts.

 

 

 

The Fluoride Debate

The Fluoride Debate:  To Use Fluoride Or Not To Use Fluoride

Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

The Debate: Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

You can find a professional opinion at every turn regarding the argument: To Fluoride or Not To Fluoride. The topic “to use fluoride” or “not to use fluoride” should be less confusing.  One simple answer.  A nice and neat, black and white answer is what we need.  Historically, in science, black and white are not something easily come by.  Currently the ongoing argument finds dentist on the defense weather they are pro fluoride or anti-fluoride.

Why The Debate?

Fluoride has been a staple of the American dental regimine and dentist recommendations since the 1950’s. You don’t have to look long, or hard to see why that protocol fell into place. Communities with naturally fluoridated water supplies had drastically lower rates of decay, sometimes as low as 30% lower than non fluoridated communities. Enter fluoride’s stampede into the american household. Fluoride found it’s way into toothpaste, mouthwash, baby vitamins, and municipal water supplies across the country.  Today more than two thirds of americans are currently receiving artificially fluoridated water at their faucet. Additionally some of their foods, toothpaste, many mouthwashes and supplements can contain fluoride.

Naturally occurring fluoride is a mineral called calcium fluoride, found in various places around the world it readily absorbs into ground water in trace amounts.  Communities with naturally occurring calcium fluoride, a mineral found in various regions around the world, have consistently demonstrated lower incidence of tooth decay so the argument seemed sound.  Except that the fluoride added to municipal water supplies all around the country is not naturally occurring calcium fluoride.

Municipal water that is fluoridated today essentially is an chemical waste product. The entire argument for the use of fluoride is based on studies in communities with naturally occurring mineral deposits of calcium fluoride. Recent studies from communities with artificially fluoridated water have not been able to backup or substantiate the original findings of reduced dental decay and cavity incident.

Fluoride is a Toxin

Many Americans are aware that fluoride is a toxin, yet somehow we look past the fact that a tube of toothpaste easily contains enough fluoride to kill a small child. As consumers we’ve educated ourselves about all kinds of toxins that find their way into our bodies, even switching out the containers in our homes to eradicate exposure to BPA’s and other known chemicals with potential to harm.

Fluoride is not an unknown. Science has linked fluoride exposure to cancer, complications with diabetes, dementia, arthritis, mental defects, alzheimer’s, birth defects and a whole myriad of other complications. Still we have not eliminated or reduced our exposure, our children’s exposure or the eventual overload to the environment to the toxins of fluoride.

Since fluoride is nearly impossible to filter out of water the best option to reduce exposure is to get it out of toothpaste and mouthwash products in your home. There are alternatives that are very effective, maybe more so than fluoride, at remineralizing enamel and strengthening teeth. In essence fluoride only effectively works topically, unless teeth are still forming below the gum line, otherwise ingesting fluoride serves no purpose and, in fact, is toxic.

In the long list of everyday things people come into contact with that are toxic, potentially even deadly, fluoride should not be overlooked or separated out from worst offenders. Fluoride hurts people.  In many cases it is forced on us through regimented doses in public water systems.

Alternatives to Fluoride

There are ways to help ensure tooth enamel stays strong and resilient while avoiding fluoride products. Individuals may focus on foods that are especially good at remineralizing teeth, eliminate specific foods that soften and wear out enamel and use products like xylitol that have shown potential in remineralizing and protecting enamel. These are just a few of the options when it comes to eliminating a toxic substance and continuing to protect your teeth and overall health.

Contact our office for products and information about alternatives to fluoride.

Health First Dental Restoration

Health First Dental Restoration

Put Your Smile First and Your Health First Dental Restorations

Do you need to replace a missing or damaged tooth? Good luck sorting through options on the market today and finding a “viable” one. And by viable, I mean finding one that looks great, works properly, will last a long time, and won’t damage your overall health. This is your teeth we’re talking about – your teeth that allow you to chew, properly consume the nutrients you need through food. There simply just aren’t a lot of great options available, even in today’s technologically advanced age.

That’s why it’s easy to see why so many patients are choosing ceramic dental implants. They are aesthetically superior to all of the other options on the market, looking nearly identical to the natural tooth. Furthermore, ceramic implants can last a lifetime, requiring no maintenance other than the routine care you give your own natural teeth.

Whether the implant can be seen in your smile or not may affect a patient’s choice of replacement options. It is imperative to know all the facts in order to make an informed decision. By examining optimal conditions inside the mouth and understanding the properties that make ceramic a superior choice to support health and reduce potential issues in the future the decision is simplified. Clients who get all-ceramic implants, also known as zirconia or zirconium oxide, are also choosing the best option for overall health, not just their oral health.

Good oral health relies on the healthy bone structure of the jaws, well seated and strong teeth with gum tissue that is actively attached to the tooth. To support these optimum conditions, teeth need to be free from plaque, disease, bacteria, and rot. Ceramic, unlike other materials, is biologically resistant to bacteria, plaque, and the formation of tartar. It has fewer places to harbor pockets of billions of bacteria and typically is so much more precise of a fit that food particles and other odor and bacteria-causing pathogens have nowhere to get lodged, therefore supporting the strength of the remaining natural teeth.

A healthy tooth seated in a healthy jaw stimulates the bone tissue around it, increasing blood flow and maintaining bone mass. When a tooth is damaged by decay or injury and has lost that corresponding area in the bone, tissue can start to diminish.  All-ceramic implants are inserted directly into the bone, just as the natural tooth would be, helping to maintain a healthy and viable bone density and protecting the health of other nearby natural teeth. Conversely, when a bridge is used to replace missing teeth nothing is implanted into the jawbone. Generally the teeth nearby are made smaller to accommodate the bridge, subsequently weakening the previously healthy teeth and making them prone to fractures and breakage. Also, as the bone tissue recedes, the gap around the bridge tends to widen, ultimately crippling the adjacent teeth and causing them to become loose and eventually fall out.

Another important factor to consider when choosing a permanent dental implant is that the material in a ceramic implant is bio-inert. It is non-reactive, non-corrosive, does not conduct heat, cold, or electricity, and will not interact with electromagnetic fields from various electronic devices.

Lastly, ceramic will not corrode, leaching toxins or chemicals into your body. Ceramic has been used and studied in the human body for decades; it has applications in everything from orthopedic implants in the hip and knees to bone screws and vertebral repair, with supporting evidence to its overall safety inside the body.

If you’re looking for a healthy, viable tooth replacement option, please call us today for comprehensive care

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants that actually look great

Ceramic Implants are the best choice, hands-down, when it comes to looking just like your own, natural, teeth. As a patient, you have a choice when it comes to replacing a tooth–from prostheses and bridges to permanent dental implants, options abound.  For most patients and doctors, implants top the list. Why? In addition to their functional benefits, implants are also practical, durable, and much more pleasing aesthetically.

At our office with Dr Marilyn K Jones DDS, we prefer ceramic implants. Their use is outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate.

Ceramic Implants are Strong

The material in theses permanent dental implants is zirconia, a ceramic that is extruded from Zirconium, is biologically inert in the human body and has a high tensile strength (meaning it is very strong). But what makes the difference for many patients is the aesthetics: zirconia implants are considered the most realistic looking tooth replacement option available on the market. And let’s face it: we all want our teeth to look good.

Straightforward Implementation

Since ceramic permanent dental implants can so closely match the look and feel of natural teeth, they immediately lend a sense of confidence to the patient. There is no denture to mess with, no embarrassing creams or gels, and no speech issues associated with tooth loss and tooth replacement that are often associated with dentures or other prostheses. There are no restrictions on diet and eating habits, no risk of losing the implant or damaging it while eating. The recipient of a ceramic dental implant also reduces the chance of bone loss in the jaw resulting in the potential of additional dental issues and a diminished jaw-line.

No Negative Side Effects

While the option to use metal implant post, made from titanium, stainless steel or other alloys, for permanent implants can still be performed, this option has aesthetic drawbacks.  Metal posts were the traditional material used in implants for decades, but they leave a silver-grey color along the gumline, making it obvious that your tooth has been replaced.  White implants made from zirconia don’t have that issue: not only are they the same color as your teeth, they actually promote soft tissue growth, meaning that the chance of receding gums are reduced, as well. With metal implants, the gums can’t grow properly, leading to a distinguishable line at base of the new tooth. Even if you experience slight gum loss with ceramic implants, there is no dark metallic line visible at the gum line.

Zirconia, ceramic implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth, they do not absorb stains from food or discolor over time. Ceramic implants can last a lifetime and retain their shape and color for the duration. They can be used for one or a few missing teeth or to anchor other prostheses when appropriate.  They are bioinert and will not absorb odor, resist plaque, and are as easy to maintain as real teeth.

Ceramic Implants Last a Lifetime

Implants are permanent: make sure you find a skilled, experienced doctor to place one.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

 

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Titanium Restorations.

Today the average adult, in America, will face the permanent loss of 3 or more adult teeth in their lifetime. That statistic has been cut in half over the last few decades and modern dentistry has been a big catalyst for the improvement.  When an adult tooth is extracted due to injury or decay, the best scenario sees that tooth replaced with a permanent implant, traditionally that has been done with titanium posts.

Restoration services can be performed with a variety of materials. The most common, older versions, were constructed from titanium with a ceramic or other composite ‘cap’ covering the anchor as the replacement “tooth”. With the advent of new materials and new technology titanium and metal implants are gradually becoming old school, being replaced by full ceramic options.

Why Change To Ceramics?

Titanium’s track record shows a long history of strong, resilient wear. Titanium was initially believed to be the perfect material to provide safe, long lasting and strong anchors for tooth restoration. Now, after decades of use, medical information and scientific evidence have uncovered a truth that was unforeseen: Titanium can be toxic when left in the body, it is not inert, corrodes over time, and is not the very effective at promoting tissue regrowth.

Though not all individuals are sensitive to titanium, or metals found in other types of metal implants, the consequences for those who are sensitive can be devastating, potentially life threatening. While the worst reactions remain relatively uncommon, lesser reactions and sensitivities are more common and still of concern.

Ceramics Enter the Dental Community After Years of Use Medically

Enter the full ceramic implant. Ceramic tooth restorations are naturally the whitest and brightest. You will never experience discoloring or the drawback of gum tissues around the base of the ceramic tooth restoration, they are easily the vanity choice. Being the best, most realistic option is nice, but it’s not why they are the new gold standard for dentists everywhere.

For decades the medical community have successfully used ceramics in other parts of the body: Hips, knees, and spine to name a few. The long success of ceramics in surgical implants spelled good news to the dental community. At last an option with more than thirty years of documented success.

Ceramics are bio-inert, making them naturally biocompatible.  Ceramic will not corrode, conduct heat or cold, never discolors, and has virtually the same strength as titanium, the old standard. This benefit has been one of the primary factors in dentists preference in ceramics. The biocompatibility equates to long term success and overall improved bone stability and retention in the jaw. Plus a much better retention, or regeneration of soft tissue or gum tissue to support the nearby surrounding healthy teeth.

Ceramic Restorations Raise the Bar

Ceramic restorations are the most compatible with the body’s immune system. They support healthy bone regrowth in areas damaged from trauma or decay, more so than any other option.  Restorations from ceramics consistently demonstrate improved bone regrowth, even gingival attachment and regrowth.  Since ceramics are so good at promoting hard and soft tissue regrowth it’s of little surprise that they are resistant to corrosion at a much higher standard than their metal counterparts. Ceramics do not absorb into tissues or into the bloodstream and won’t corrode over time. That fact further boosts the desirability of ceramics as a restoration option.

These facts have elevated ceramic tooth restorations to a prime choice for dental practices who put their patients long term health and well being as their number one priority.

If you have questions, would like a consult or are ready to schedule your appointment please contact us.

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

Metals in dental restorations have a potential link to overall health inadequacies. Metals compromise immune systems in sensitive individuals.

Multiple studies correlate metal sensitivities to a battery of autoimmune diseases and several processes that critical in running the bodies delicately balanced endocrine system. Ultimately the thyroid, pancreas, and other critical hormone systems are typically most affected.

All metals (titanium, nickel, steel, silver and other alloys)used in dental procedures, weather for implants or abutments, fillings or dentures, will eventually begin to corrode. As time passes corroding metal particles become ions binding to proteins inside the body’s individual cells. Due to blood vessels creating a perfect transportation system, metal particles can readily travel throughout the body. For some individuals these “foreign invaders” set off a chain reaction within the immune system. As the immune system goes on high alert and begins attacking various parts of the body numerous symptoms arise. Consequently various internal systems may begin to fail.

Symptoms to metal implants vary from patient to patient. Often including an oral burning sensation, general fatigue, skin rashes, a constant dull pain and in some cases, loss of the implant. A paper published in July of 2011 focused on titanium allergy in patients who have undergone an implant, it concluded in part; “This review of the literature indicates that titanium can induce hypersensitivity in susceptible patients and could play a critical role in implant failure.”

Who Cares

What impact, if any, will metals have on you? No one can say for certain. Even petients with existing metal components in their mouth risk that there will be a tipping point. When the level of adsorbed metal becomes more than the immune system will tolerate. Most noteworthy, time plays a factor. As time passes more and more ions can be absorbed so that the effects of metal toxins might not be evident for years.

Great New Options

z-systems zirconia dental implants

ceramics used in dental implants are non-metallic and white throughout

With Zirconium, or all ceramic implants, there is never a risk of being slowly poisoned. Ceramic dental implants do not corrode. They will not absorb or dissolve in any way, as a result, there’s no need to consider long term replacements as they can last a lifetime with the same regular hygiene your natural teeth need.

Call today for a consult and to learn more about your choices and about implants that are customized to benefit your long term health.

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