Dental Restorations: Bridges -vs- Implants

Dental Restorations: Bridges -vs- Implants

Conventional bridges -vs- dental implants

Why dental implants are better than conventional bridges

Patients are increasingly opting for dental implants over conventional prostheses such as dentures or permanent bridges. Implants offer a number of reasons, both physically and aesthetically, they are superior to older restoration options. Since implants sit securely in the jaw bone, and not glued to adjoining teeth, they offer superior durability and look completely natural at the same time.

Three major categories of restorations still compete with implant option for tooth replacement:

Bonded dental bridge

Bonded dental bridges use the teeth adjacent to the empty space to help support the missing tooth by using a very thin piece of metal or tooth-colored material to overlay and bond to the back of the adjacent teeth. A tooth replacement is set between these two bonded pieces in order to fill in the empty space. Failure rate is about 25 percent after just five years of use.

Cantilevered dental bridge

A cantilevered restoration uses the closest tooth next to the empty space to support the missing tooth using the either the back of the neighboring tooth or a full crown to help support the missing tooth. Success rate is higher than with a bonded bridge depending on how much pressure the actual replacement endures due to grinding and normal wear.

Conventional dental bridge

This type of restoration uses crowns on the teeth next to the empty space that are hooked together to help support the missing tooth. Unfortunately conventional dental bridges predictably fail at a range from 20 percent over 3 years to 3 percent over 23 years.

Compare to the (ceramic) Dental implant

A dental implant is created from a high performance material (zirconium oxide) that is inserted into the bone to act like a natural tooth-root. Due to its nonmetallic construction the ceramic dental implant does not interfere with the body’s immune or meridian systems and therefore does not create a potential for rejection. Once anchored into the jaw, the implant integrates directly into the bone to give firm support to the artificial replacement that it is built to hold and should last the lifetime of a patient.

Routine maintenance of a dental implant is exactly the same as a person would follow for normal teeth.

Healthy patients prefer implants

Patients who prefer dental implants say that they are more comfortable and provide a more secure fit than fixed bridges or removable dentures. Dentures tend to make a person feel and look older. They can cause embarrassment in social situations when they slip and click, and hamper the everyday pleasure of eating comfortably.

Reasons to consider a ceramic dental implant:

• preserves healthy natural surrounding teeth

• looks and feels like natural teeth

• enhances a sense of self-confidence when eating, talking and smiling

• no gooey denture adhesives to deal with

• no embarrassingly loose dentures

• improves quality of speech

• perfectly natural comfort and fit

Anyone who is missing one or more of their teeth may be a candidate for implants. If more than a few of the teeth are missing, implants in supporting a crown or bridge can replace those teeth and function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, then implants may be placed to fix in place a full-mouth fixture.

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

Root Canal: Toxic Time Capsule

Root Canal: Toxic Time Capsule

Poisonous time capsule: Root Canal

Poison and toxins in our environment can come from unexpected places

Root Canals use a variety of dangerous chemicals to clean the inside of the tooth

That’s one way to describe a root canal. Mini time capsules in the body, full of poison. Toxins, trapped inside the body, with the potential to spread inside your body, then attack your immune system, potentially triggering an immune response. That outcome can wreak havoc on organs and tissues. Ultimately this compromises an otherwise healthy body.

Ask anyone, most people are opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside their body.

A morgue in your mouth

Dead, and dying tissue, and bacterial colonies sealed inside a mini coffin. A root canal does exactly that. When a patient gets a root canal, it then creates a mini coffin of chemicals and necrotic tissue. Root canal procedures originally were designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been died, or is dying. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) further complications can then arise. Those complications may be an abscessed tooth or further decay tooth may abscess, continue to decay. Additionally the tooth may fall out, leading to even more problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the canal in the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and kill any remaining, living tissue. As a result, embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarantee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is 100% not possible. Consequently in every case bits of necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue gets left behind. 100% of the time. Bacterial colonies and infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones. This will ultimately weakening and damaging local tissue. Those same toxins and bacteria can lead to a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues become compounded and new issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to address dead, dying or abscessed teeth.

Do You Have a Root Canal?

If you have already had a root canal? Have you had a root canal recommended? Come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy yet attractive alternatives.  Choices that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

Ceramic Implants; dental restoration gold standard

The Rolls Royce of dental restorations, as close to the real thing as you can get: Ceramic Implants

More Choices than Ever Before

Clients today have a few choices in dentistry when considering types of tooth replacement. From prostheses and bridges to permanent dental implants.  For a culmination of reasons implants head the top of the list in regards to preference by both patient and doctor.  Implants have medical benefits over other standardized tooth replacement choices but they are also practical, durable and much more pleasing aesthetically.

Ceramic Implants-the Gold Standard: Strong

Currently ceramic implants, also known as zirconium or zirconia, are outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate.  The material in the implants, Zirconium, in addition to being biologically inert in the human body, and having a high tensile strength (very strong) is considered preferable by many simply because it offers the most real looking tooth replacement option.

Ceramic Implants-the Gold Standard: Beautiful

Since ceramic dental implants can so closely match the look and feel of natural teeth they immediately lend a sense of confidence to the patient. There is no denture to mess with, no embarrassing creams or gels, and no speech issues associated with tooth loss and tooth replacement be it with dentures or other prostheses. There are no restrictions on diet and eating habits, no risk of losing the implant or damaging it while eating. The recipient of a ceramic dental implant also reduces the chance of bone loss in the jaw resulting in the potential of additional dental issues and a diminished jaw-line.

Ceramic Implants-the Gold Standard: Healthy

While the option to use metal implant post, made from titanium, stainless steel or other alloys, for permanent implants can still be performed this option has aesthetic drawbacks.  Metal post were the traditional material used in implants for decades; the aesthetic drawbacks included a sliver-grey color to the artificial tooth.

 Additionally all white ceramic dental implants will not reveal ugly gray lines like in the case of titanium or other metal implants. In instances of metal implants a distinguishable line is typically seen at base of the new tooth. With Ceramic implants even if soft tissue around the tooth recede, over time, there is no dark metallic line visible at the gum line.

Ceramic Implants-the Gold Standard: Natural

Zirconium, or ceramic implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth, they do not absorb stains from food or discolor over time. Ceramic implants can last a lifetime and retain their shape and color for the duration. They can be used in the case of one or a few missing teeth or to anchor other prostheses when appropriate.  They support the mouths natural immune system and will not absorb odor, resist plaque and are as easy to maintain as real teeth. They support bone and tissue growth the same way natural bone and teeth do.

Implants are permanent and placing one in such a way that it looks its best and is the most authentic requires a degree of expertise.  The placement of permanent implants is a surgical procedure so choosing a skilled doctor with a high degree of expertise is paramount for the best look and feel of your new teeth.

Multi-Visit procedures -vs- Single Day Procedures

Multi-Visit procedures -vs- Single Day Procedures

Ceramic Implants Done with Best Potential Outcome
Multi-visit placement vs single day placement

You’ve done your research. Deciding on the very best, you are getting a ceramic (or zirconia) implant. This is the best option for you. Ceramic implants, far and away, are the best looking, strongest, and most natural option for tooth replacement. Any concerns about longevity or durability have been put to rest since ceramic options can last as long as natural, healthy, teeth. Add to that how much ceramic implants actually increase the viability and vitality of your whole mouth in comparison to other replacement options and the choice was made for you.

You may be considering your options for the restorative procedure itself. There are dentists who will do an implant in one day, many however, prefer several visits to complete the implant process. You might wonder if it matters.

The promise of instant gratification and less planning or scheduling has you considering if it really makes a difference in the outcome. It’s comforting to hope that such a big procedure could be over and done in a single day. That may be part of the reason single day visits are offered. We are programmed to go looking for the easy button, instant gratification.

Word of warning:

The science and research indicates one major factor contributting to implant failure is not allowing time for bone and soft tissues to heal before completing the procedure.

Do your mouth a favor and give it the proper time to heal.

A ceramic implant is anchored in the jaw bone. Depending on several factors, including the number of teeth to be restored and the quality and quantity of jaw bone, you may be able to start with the initial procedure being the anchor itself. In some instances there may be recommended procedures to do prior to implanting the anchor in order to ensure proper bone mass and health. Afterwards the anchor is given adequate time for the bone around it to heal and be strongly attached. There may be a follow up exam to confirm this. The next step is placing a new, ceramic, fixed, permanent tooth.

Most implant procedures are very predictable and your skilled dentist can make the entire procedure nearly effortless. It’s worth the wait to know you’ve got the most advanced, successful system. You are investing time to ensure the best outcome, giving yourself the best odds of a restoration that will last your entire life and look great doing it. Lets face it, this was no small decision and you should know, you’ve done your research. When you come in to see us we will be happy to work with you to find the best time and availability to fit your schedule.

The entire process requires very specialized, advanced equipment and training. We have the training, the expertise and are ready to give you the smile you deserve. While in our care all aspects of your overall health will be taken into consideration, your comfort, health, convenience, investment and satisfaction matter to us.

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

There might be a toxic trap inside your dental work

Toxins trapped inside the body, swirl around in your immune system and potentially trigger an immune response. Inflammation and infection left alone, can wreak havoc on organs and tissues and compromise an otherwise healthy body. Most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body. Poisonous, also it’s gross. 

Trapping dead, dying and bacterial colonies inside the body happen when a root canal is performed. A root canal is a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to stay alive. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised. Now the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth can abscess, continuing to decay. This decay potentially affects surrounding teeth. An affected tooth may also fall out, leading to additional problems.

The truth about root canals

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth. Blood vessel nourishing the tooth, the nerve, and pulp are extracted. Chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. The chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the new hole as possible. This process kills any remaining, viable or nonviable, rotting tissue.Essentially an embalming process for what remains of soft tissues inside the tooth.

We know after decades of research and thousands of patients that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue gets left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeates surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas. Those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues may become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As medical news around this potential hazard develops, many dentist are adopting new solutions to  addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

Due Diligence

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended–and you’re worried about a toxic trap inside your mouth–come see our team. Get all of your options. Our team can give you healthy, attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Titanium Restorations.

Today the average adult, in America, will face the permanent loss of 3 or more adult teeth in their lifetime. That statistic has been cut in half over the last few decades and modern dentistry has been a big catalyst for the improvement.  When an adult tooth is extracted due to injury or decay, the best scenario sees that tooth replaced with a permanent implant, traditionally that has been done with titanium posts.

Restoration services can be performed with a variety of materials. The most common, older versions, were constructed from titanium with a ceramic or other composite ‘cap’ covering the anchor as the replacement “tooth”. With the advent of new materials and new technology titanium and metal implants are gradually becoming old school, being replaced by full ceramic options.

Why Change To Ceramics?

Titanium’s track record shows a long history of strong, resilient wear. Titanium was initially believed to be the perfect material to provide safe, long lasting and strong anchors for tooth restoration. Now, after decades of use, medical information and scientific evidence have uncovered a truth that was unforeseen: Titanium can be toxic when left in the body, it is not inert, corrodes over time, and is not the very effective at promoting tissue regrowth.

Though not all individuals are sensitive to titanium, or metals found in other types of metal implants, the consequences for those who are sensitive can be devastating, potentially life threatening. While the worst reactions remain relatively uncommon, lesser reactions and sensitivities are more common and still of concern.

Ceramics Enter the Dental Community After Years of Use Medically

Enter the full ceramic implant. Ceramic tooth restorations are naturally the whitest and brightest. You will never experience discoloring or the drawback of gum tissues around the base of the ceramic tooth restoration, they are easily the vanity choice. Being the best, most realistic option is nice, but it’s not why they are the new gold standard for dentists everywhere.

For decades the medical community have successfully used ceramics in other parts of the body: Hips, knees, and spine to name a few. The long success of ceramics in surgical implants spelled good news to the dental community. At last an option with more than thirty years of documented success.

Ceramics are bio-inert, making them naturally biocompatible.  Ceramic will not corrode, conduct heat or cold, never discolors, and has virtually the same strength as titanium, the old standard. This benefit has been one of the primary factors in dentists preference in ceramics. The biocompatibility equates to long term success and overall improved bone stability and retention in the jaw. Plus a much better retention, or regeneration of soft tissue or gum tissue to support the nearby surrounding healthy teeth.

Ceramic Restorations Raise the Bar

Ceramic restorations are the most compatible with the body’s immune system. They support healthy bone regrowth in areas damaged from trauma or decay, more so than any other option.  Restorations from ceramics consistently demonstrate improved bone regrowth, even gingival attachment and regrowth.  Since ceramics are so good at promoting hard and soft tissue regrowth it’s of little surprise that they are resistant to corrosion at a much higher standard than their metal counterparts. Ceramics do not absorb into tissues or into the bloodstream and won’t corrode over time. That fact further boosts the desirability of ceramics as a restoration option.

These facts have elevated ceramic tooth restorations to a prime choice for dental practices who put their patients long term health and well being as their number one priority.

If you have questions, would like a consult or are ready to schedule your appointment please contact us.

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Trouble; Toxins and Root Canals

What root canals are really leaving behind. Toxins, trapped inside the body, swirling around inside your body, attacking your immune system and potentially triggering an immune response or inflammation. Ultimately wreaking havoc on organs and tissues, compromising an otherwise healthy body. These are the facts of getting a root canal.

Ask anyone, most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body.

A morgue in your mouth

Trapping dead, and dying tissues and bacterial colonies locked inside the body is exactly what happens when a patient gets a root canal, a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive, or viable. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised and the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth may abscess, continue to decay–potentially affecting surrounding teeth or it may fall out, leading to additional problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and to kill any remaining, viable or nonviable tissue. This equates to essentially embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarentee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case there is always necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas, but those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues can become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

Restorations can Prevent Future Pain

Restorations can Prevent Future Pain

Choosing the right restorations can prevent pain in the future

Unexpected circumstances can turn an almost perfect smile into a painful one. Time changes things, even a perfect smile. If you are experiencing oral pain, need a future tooth replacement or restoration, or have had a restoration you are not happy with, consider the following;

A medical link exists for potential increased frequency in headaches, migraine headaches and even TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorders) related to tooth loss without proper restoration. Even small changes in bite and tooth placement have been identified as having the capacity to be problematic.

 

When a tooth is lost…
due to trauma, decay or periodontal disease the surrounding bone material immediately becomes compromised.  Additionally the missing tooth no longer helps distribute pressure during chewing and biting, thereby increasing the amount of pressure and bite force placed on the remaining teeth. The additional pressure on the remaining teeth can be responsible for fractures to those teeth, excessive wear, and all too often the remaining teeth drift or shift to new positions in the jaw and in so doing, change the overall bite.

Changes in bite…
and tooth placement due to shifting can typically affect the aesthetics of a smile, what you may not know is that it can also compromise the health of the remaining teeth. First by creating changes in how straight teeth are potentially diminishing your ability to clean properly, secondly drifting teeth might not be properly aligned and bite force from normal chewing may potentially chip or crack teeth.

Bridges
Common practice traditionally replaced a single missing tooth with a fixed bridge. Unfortunately a bridge does not address any of the negative effects of a missing tooth. Soft tissues still retreat, bone mass in the jaw is still absorbed, the surrounding teeth are compromised by the process of preparing them for the bridge. With the lack of adequate bone and soft tissues the remaining teeth, often, are susceptible to drifting. Decay and rot also threatened the neighboring teeth once they’ve been drilled and filed for the bridge.

Implants
For decades dentist have been able to surgically implant permanent teeth to take the place of a tooth lost from trauma, decay or disease. For several decades dentist have been using all ceramic implants. The post that goes into the jaw bone is no longer metal but ceramic. Ceramics have proven over and over to be the ideal long term solution when getting an implant.  Uniquely capable of being integrated and accepted into the biology of the mouth, both promoting soft tissue gum growth and fusing seamlessly with living bone while not disturbing or compromising the surrounding teeth, thusly providing a solution to all potentially negative outcomes of a missing tooth.

Full Ceramic Implants
Ceramic implants are the answer to dentist concerns for the health of their patients and for the patient there is nothing that compares to the aesthetics of an all ceramic implant. Additionally ceramic implants unique properties will never leach into your tissues or body, they will not breakdown or corrode, they do not conduct hot or cold and are, in fact, so precisely fitted that they might fit better and look better than the original teeth, certainly more so than any other restoration option. All while leaving other healthy teeth perfectly in place and unadulterated.

For the best experience and a guarantee in your implant, to ensure a lifetime smile, call our office and make an appointment. Our professional staff is expertly trained. You can trust our extensive experience in implants and restorations to leave you with a beautiful, pain free smile for years to come.

More Than Brushing: Answers to Bad Breath

More Than Brushing: Answers to Bad Breath

Bad Breath doesn’t discriminate

Ever notice a friend turning away, even while you retell the best parts of your weekend? Of course we have all experienced bad breath and like a lot of people, the first reaction to resolving the problem; up our dental dental hygiene game. Brushing and flossing are key to a healthy mouth that smells fresh and clean but you don’t need to brush after every meal, floss multiple times and use swimming pool amounts of mouthwash to keep from offending friends with halitosis (bad breath).

If you’be been haunted or plagued with chronic, smelly, bad breath, or have that bitter, nasty, morning breath taste in the back of your throat on a regular basis there may be more to it than just oral hygiene.

First you need to tackle the obvious contributors;

  • Get your teeth cleaned by your dentist and hygienist consistently one or more times per year according to your dentist recommendation. This will eliminate contributions to bad breath from pockets of bacterial colonies and decay.
  • Brush with a regularly replaced, soft bristled toothbrush twice a day.
  • Floss all of your teeth once a day.
  • Consider using a tongue scrapper to take one last measure to eliminating bacteria and odor causing detris in your mouth. The bonus is you may start smelling and tasting better than ever before, plus-no bad breath!
  • Drink plenty of water. Water is what hydrates the body and a well hydrated bodies ensure lots of healthy saliva. Lots of saliva helps wash away the bacterium that typically cause gingivitis, plaque, and yes, bad breath.

Next address dietary contributors;

  • Obvious contributors to smelly breath like onion, garlic, that extra frothy latte, are easy to identify and hard to say no to, if you must indulge, brush or follow with gum or breath mints.
  • Eat a varied, healthful diet. Diets especially low in carbohydrates can contribute to bad breath, so excluding foods that can cause inflammation, but adding in a wide variety of fruits, vegetables and healthy proteins like nuts or cheese can help mitigate bad breath caused when body chemistry is not ideal.

Sweep your environment for other culprits;

  • Literally keeping things as tidy and clean as possible can reduce the potential for allergies. Allergies are a big contributor to rhinitis that can contribute to post nasal drip and major halitosis. If your nose gets stuffy, you breath through your mouth a lot, you may have allergy related bad breath.
    • Keeping dust to a minimum, using air filters, especially hepa filters to get the cleanest air inside your living space.
  • Introduce a humidifier. Humidifiers can improve the moisture content of air and reduce inflammation in mucus membranes inside the mouth, throat and nose, all of which will help keep the body best able to tackle the kinds of bacteria and inflammation that can cause stinky breath.
  • Many people also find that flushing their sinuses with a neti pot, daily, significantly reduces pollutants, pollens and other irritants that add to the kind of sinusitis underlying in many cases of chronic sinusitis.

There are other reasons for long term, recurring bad breath that can be related to conditions you may need to see a doctor for. Cracks in teeth, cavities, deviated septums, loose dental restorations, even allergies to the dental restorations you currently have are included in the list of potential culprits. If you have addressed all of the above problems and bad breath persist, call us today for an exam to help you get to the root of the issue. No one should have to live with the uncomfortable embarrassment and stigma that goes along with long term, chronic bad breath.

Don’t forget that alcohol, smoking, some prescription drugs and illnesses can cause bad breath all on their own despite other measures you take to get rid of it.

 

Dental Restoration; a New You

In a state of restoration

Statistics suggest the average American between 35 and 65 will lose 3 adult teeth in their lifetime, not including wisdom teeth that many adults remove intentionally.  That number may seem staggering, to some but is drastically lower than statics dating back to the 1970s when losing 6 to 8 teeth or more in a lifetime was normal.

Where to start

If you have ever been faced with tooth restoration due to loss or infection you know that the choices can be overwhelming. Once you know that you are going to need to replace a natural tooth with an artificial one you begin weighing all options.  Ceramic implants are considered the gold standard of restoration but the choices can still seem convoluted, considering dentist have so many procedures available to patients. For a multitude of reasons, cost and time being two big factors, patients occasionally find themselves considering getting a bridge, just for now, until they are ready to take that big step into oral surgery and getting a permanent ceramic implant.

Pros and cons of a temporary fix

Getting a bridge will have a permanent and detrimental effect on the teeth nearest the tooth that needs replacing:

  • To get a proper fit and bonding to the bridge your healthy teeth will need to be filed down, stripped of their outside protective cover, made small enough to allow for the substantial bridgework to fit and be secure
  • Should those nearby teeth not be in the greatest shape, then you may have to sacrifice additional teeth, further away, to bond the bridge to.
  • Bridges have a finite life span.
  • Ten years is about the max but even that is not guaranteed.
  • Bridges can be pulled off from eating sticky foods.
  • Cracked or broken bridges can result from a variety of foods consumed also.
  • Bridges can discolor or the areas around the bond yellow or fade.
  • Since the nearby teeth must be compromised in order to secure the bridge, those sacrificial teeth are more prone to disease, infection and rot.
  • Eventually the healthy gum tissues often recede, shrink and pull away from the bridge.
  • This can leave an unsightly and noticeable gap between the bridge and the gum line. (Besides leaving a noticeable gap it also becomes a trap for particles of food and debris that feed pockets of stinky bacteria)
  • Additionally, since there is not a tooth in the jawbone the bone mass in that area will diminish over time. This can affect the surrounding teeth, especially if you have multiple teeth replaced, it can also affect your jaw line and the contours of your face.
  • Outcome: a bridge means you will need additional dental work just to maintain and support a tooth replacement that will still, no matter how well you take care of it, need replacing.
    Permanent solutions for your dental restoration

    Permanent solutions for your dental restoration

    Did you know that getting a ceramic implant would allow you to skip all that? Yes, Often in one or two visits you can have a permanent, lifetime restoration of a lost tooth. Usually there is a visit to ensure the procedure went well and that you have healed all the way. After that? After that you are set. Smile away and be confident that you have the closest thing to your natural teeth possible.  Feel good that you  are supporting the rest of your teeth and even your overall health.

    Call our qualified team to get your restoration consultation today.