The toxic Supplement

The toxic Supplement

The Toxic Supplement Your Body Could Do Without

There’s a lot of noise pollution out there regarding the argument for or against fluoride.  Fluoride has been a staple of America’s dental regime since the nineteen fifties. Without thought, or apprehension, communities have taken what the dental specialist pushed as gospel, therefore  fluoride is good for you. It’s an equation more than six decades in the making. If a little bit of fluoride is good for teeth, than a lot must be even better. Until its not.  Interestingly enough, fluoride is the one supplement that serves no function. The human body does not need fluoride to function properly.

Fluoride Saturation

So why have towns across the country been adding fluoride to the city water for decades? Communities with naturally occurring calcium fluoride, a mineral found in various regions around the world, historically have demonstrated lower incidence of tooth decay. Making the argument seem sound. Except, fluoride added to drinking water, for the majority of american households means the government is putting it there, and not the naturally occurring kind. The fluoride added to drinking water always is derived from chemical waste. Americans and people the world over are beginning to experience fluoride saturation

fluoride saturation.

Fluoride added to water is a fact of life for many communities with otherwise pure and clean, naturally occurring water supplies.

Except that the fluoride added to municipal water supplies all around the country (and the world) is not naturally occurring calcium fluoride. More than two thirds of Americans are currently receiving artificially fluoridated water at their tap. Water that is fluoridated by what essentially is a chemical waste product. A waste product that is toxic. The entire argument for the use of fluoride is based on studies in communities with naturally occurring mineral deposits of calcium fluoride. Recent studies from communities with artificially fluoridated water have not been able to backup or substantiate the original findings of reduced dental decay and cavity incident.

Continued Fluoride Saturation/Adding New Communities to the List

So why do NEW communities (around the world and) here in the U.S. continue to begin new fluoridation programs on their municipal water supplies? Conditioning and propaganda. Decades of trusted professionals telling us its good for us. Federal and government backing and American Dental Association support. All part of the propaganda to not change the status quo.

Poison and Fluoride

Many Americans are aware that fluoride is a toxin. Yet somehow we look past the fact that a tube of toothpaste easily contains enough fluoride to kill a small child. As consumers we’ve educated ourselves about all kinds of toxins that find their way into our bodies, even switching out the containers in our homes to eradicate exposure to BPA’s and other known chemicals with potential to harm. Fluoride saturation is not an unknown. Science has linked fluoride exposure to cancer, complications with diabetes, dementia, arthritis, mental defects, alzheimer’s, birth defects and a whole myriad of other complications. Still we have not eliminated or reduced our exposure, our childrens exposure or the eventual overload to the environment to the toxins of fluoride.

fluoride saturation has reached it's tipping point

Fluoride saturation in water, food, and personal care products: drowning us in toxic chemicals.

Since fluoride is nearly impossible to filter out of water the best option to reduce exposure is to get it out of toothpaste and mouthwash products in your home. There are alternatives that are very effective, maybe more so than fluoride, at remineralizing enamel and strengthening teeth. In essence fluoride only effectively works topically, unless teeth are still forming below the gum line, otherwise ingesting fluoride serves no purpose and, in fact, is toxic. In the long list of everyday things people come into contact with that are toxic, potentially even deadly fluoride should not be overlooked or segregated from the worst offenders. Fluoride hurts people and in many cases is forced on us through regimented doses in public water systems. Contact our office for products and information about alternatives to fluoride.

Biological Dentist Healthy Options for Great Teeth

Biological Dentist Healthy Options for Great Teeth

Biological Dentist get it

It could be a toothache, maybe you’re due for a cleaning and want a new approach. People call biological dentists looking for a healthier alternative to traditional practices. New patients are looking for the safest and healthiest way to get out of oral pain, and keep a healthy mouth.

At our biological dental practice in Houston, Texas, we get it.

Unfortunately, the safest way to get out of pain is to not get into pain in the first place. Obviously things happen in life and sometimes a toothache is unavoidable.  Frequently patients wait too long and a preventable dental problem escalates into a major dental emergency and often a major dental procedure.

When to Call

So how do you know when you should see a dentist? What are the early warnings signs so you nip things in the bud before they escalate to major problems?

  1. Floss regularly. I know you’ve heard it before, but I’m not telling you to floss to keep your teeth clean (you already KNOW that). If you floss regularly you will notice small cavities or other problems between the teeth sooner. A small cavity is MUCH easier to fix than a big one – which might require an extraction and dental implant. If you floss and feel a small pain, twinge, or anything else weird or out of the ordinary, give us a call and we can probably prevent the problem from getting any worse.
  2. Look in the mirror. Most people are so used to brushing their teeth that they don’t watch themselves do it anymore. But spending a few minutes before or after you brush to look in the mirror can prevent a lot of problems. Pull your lips back and check along the gum line. Are there any bumps? Any discoloration? Lesions? All of those things could mean major problems forming under the gumline. And most of those early warning signs can prevent major dental work – and a major toothache – later.

Other signs it’s time to call

  1. Pay attention when you eat. Pain or twinges in your mouth while eating are often a sign of bigger problems. If you eat sugar and have some pain, you might be getting a cavity (did you know many cavities, when treated early, don’t even need to be drilled out? Catch them early to save yourselves the whir of the drill!). Pain when eating hot or colds things? Your gums could be having an issue or maybe a cavity. Hurts when you chew on one side? Maybe an abscess, infection, cavity, cracked tooth… any number of things.
  2. Do your teeth hurt when you wake up in the morning? This is a classic sign of bruxism – or grinding your teeth. Why does it matter? If you grind at night, you are at risk for TMJ problems, cavities, cracked teeth, and more. All of which can be avoided with a simple bit guard if caught early. If your mouth hurts when you wake up, call and schedule an appointment.

When Else to Call

90% of dental emergencies can be avoided by taking the simple precautions above. Regular visits to the dentist don’t have to be scary or painful – they can prevent scary and painful visits later, in fact.

So give us a call. Check for the early warning signs, and prevent future dental emergencies.

And if you do have an emergency, come visit our holistic dental practice in Houston – we are happy to help keep your mouth beautiful and healthy – and out of pain!

Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

Eliminate Food Related Sensitive Teeth

A long history of enduring sensitive teeth doesn’t mean a lifetime. Minimize sensitive teeth related to food.

1.)  Chew Gum

Reduce sensitive teeth by chewing gum (sugarless of course). Chewing a stick of gum’s a great way to keep saliva flowing. Chewing creates ample saliva helping prevent periodontal disease (gum disease). The benefits of chewing gum are particularly measurable in the initial thirty minutes immediately after a meal. When you chew gum it increases salivary flow, helping to wash away debris and bacteria that may be stuck to teeth. Gum that contains xylitol can also aid in remineralizing enamel.

2.) Eat Fewer Processed Foods, Especially Starchy Carbs

We all know the dangers associated with sugar filled snacks and juices. Sugar wreaks havoc on teeth. Surprisingly, crackers, chips, cereal and other starchy snack foods can be just as detrimental as sugary snacks. Starches readily convert to usable sugars when consumed by the bacterial colonies in your mouth.  Brushing after starchy snacks, even chewing gum can reduce the particles left behind. This keeps acids excreted by bacteria to a minimum, preventing periodontal disease and decay.

3.)  Get Your Teeth Cleaned by a Professional

It’s not enough to just brush and floss in order to protect your teeth from the threat of decay and periodontal disease. Eliminating sensitive teeth takes an all over approach. For optimal conditions you need to have your teeth cleaned. In the chair–the dentist chair–where your dentist and their hygienist can inspect each tooth and surrounding gum tissue for potential problems.

While in the chair your teeth will be scaled (scraping off all tartar, stains, and plaque) with special tools designed especially for each tooth.  Your tooth will even get scaled below the gum line. Plaque and tartar may be accumulating out of sight, initiating periodontal disease. After your teeth have been scaled they will then be polished. Polishing the teeth at the end of the cleaning is the step that gives you that slippery feeling on your teeth. Did you know when your teeth get polished it removes all microscopic abrasions and scratches? Places where bacteria might be able to get a foothold. That leaves teeth smooth and strong.

4.) Get Enough Sleep

Second only to smoking, studies show sleep is the next biggest factor in worsening periodontal disease.  Our schedules are busier now than ever before. Often there are more demands for our time than we can accommodate. Lack of sleep has been shown to affect how rapidly we age. lack of sleep affects how readily our immune system respond. Sleep even effects our response times while driving or reacting to physical demands.

Now scientific studies also conclude that periodontal disease gets measurably worse in patients who routinely get six or less hours of sleep per night. In the same studies, those patients who increased their nightly sleep up to seven or more hours saw a dramatic decrease in the spread of periodontal disease.

Poor gum health, from gum disease, can stimulate nerves in teeth inducing sensitive teeth.

5.) CoQ10–Proper Vitamins and Nutrition

Naturally, the first line of defense against all forms of gum disease is proper dental hygiene, including brushing twice daily, flossing once a day plus routine professional cleanings. Good oral health also requires proper nutrition. Supplements and nutrients that are known to work to boost the immune system. They also build collagen in the periodontal ligaments, and decrease inflammation. This helps to stop gum disease before it gets started – and helps to heal gum disease. One of the most researched and highly recommended supplements for fighting gum disease is CoQ-10.

In Recent studies CoQ-10 was given in a blind study in which candidates with significant gum disease (periodontal disease) were chosen after aggressive brushing and flossing had no measurable impact. Those patients receiving the CoQ-10 had measurable and sustained improvement from their periodontal disease, in many of the patient’s gum disease completely resolved after only 8 weeks of therapy.

There are a number of choices when choosing the CoQ-10 that is right for you. Learn about your options and choose wisely.

Give us a call today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

Early First Check-ups Keep Teeth Healthiest

Early First Check-ups Keep Teeth Healthiest

Never too early for a first check-up

  • The First Year is the ideal time for the initial check-up visit with your child’s dentist.
  • By twelve months old your child can have as few as one or two teeth or as many as twelve teeth.
    • regardless of the number of teeth, making the dentist a familiar, friendly place ensures a better visit for you and baby.
    • Between two and three years of age kids get their full set of baby teeth complete with molars.
      • Molars appear last and the front middle teeth usually emerging first.

Often the exact moment a child’s first dental visit is recommended can seem arbitrary. Some recommendations call for a dental visit at age one. Some recommend as soon as teeth first appear. With such a wide range it may be hard to decide how urgent that first dental check up should be.

First Impressions and a Positive Experience

A good rule of thumb is to start regular check-ups with the dentist early. Start visits after the first tooth has erupted, or by the age of one.

  • Very young children become accustomed to visiting various places and can quickly build a positive impression of the dentist office when they have several quick, easy and positive visits.
  • Learning to sit in the dental chair, open up and say, “ah” and having fingers and tools in their mouth can seem strange for a little one.
  • A small child with a few positive past experiences will be much more inclined to trust the dentist if and when a bigger issue should arise.

Quick and Invaluable

A first visit to the dentist can be a very brief visit or last up to thirty minutes. The dentist will check bite alignment, teeth, and soft tissues. Since decay can start as soon as teeth erupt, the dentist will also thoroughly check teeth for signs of decay, and go over at home care with you and your child, and if indicated they may perform a gentle cleaning to remove plaque, tartar, any stains and quickly polish teeth.

Questions and History

If you have any questions or concerns there will be time to discuss these things as well. Questions you have may range from fluoride use, number of times and length of time to brush, appropriate tooth brushes, or discussing previous bumps and tumbles that may leave teeth chipped or injured, mentioning those events can help your dentist evaluate potential future issues.

Best Times To Set Up Appointments

  • Earlier in the day many children will have a much higher tolerance for new experiences and new people.
  • A goodnights rest, and a healthy breakfast, will set the stage for successful dental visit and exam.
  • Bringing a favorite toy, book, or blanket can also be helpful in building confidence while visiting a new place like the dentist office.

Finally

First time dental check-ups are ice-breakers. They set young children up for positive experiences when visiting the dentist in the future. Being extra patient and calm go a long way in sending the message that there is nothing to be worried about or afraid of. Talk to your little one in the days leading up to your appointment. Telling small children how dentists help keep our teeth healthy and strong also relays a comforting, reassuring message.

If your child is already older than one and has not yet been to a dentist or more than six months have passed, this is a good review, now is the perfect time to get that appointment booked.

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

For some of us, having a perfect smile seems like a far away dream

If you have ever had a missing tooth–one or more–consider yourself a candidate for implants. Even if you are missing multiple teeth, implants can support a crown or bridge replacing those teeth. Implants function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, implants may be placed to fix a permanent, in place, full-mouth fixture or denture.

Often the process of getting a dental restoration seems overwhelming, read on to get answers to important concerns.

How to get a bridge -vs- how to get an implant

Bridge: Conventional Dental Bridge Placement requires modifying adjacent tooth

Getting fitted for a denture bridge requires the manual modification of the teeth on either side the bridge. This process significantly weakens adjacent teeth. In order to fit a conventional bridge the structure of the existing teeth has to be ground down to support the false bridge. This practice weakens adjacent teeth.

Dental implants do not affect the health or longevity of neighboring teeth at all, in fact implants support the health of surrounding teeth. Once established, implants are firmly set into the bone making them more natural than dentures or conventional bridges, with none of the shifting that dentures normally display.

Some problems with conventional bridges

• Since they are bonded to the adjacent tooth with a glue-like substance, bridges more often become loose and fall out

• Cracks and fissures form over time, due to normal wear and tear, causing them to become fragile and prone to breakage

• Surrounding soft tissue, and often bone, recedes leaving less support to adjacent teeth

• Improper fit can lead to either tooth decay or irritation to the surrounding sensitive tissue in the mouth

No such problems with implants

Ceramic dental implants are recommended to patients because:

Permanent solutions for your dental restoration
• Chewing is easy with excellent biting pressure provided by implant

• Dental Implants have a good reputation for providing reliable and long-standing service, providing decades of use with few, if any complications

• Comfortable fit and durability because they are well secured and integrated with the bone and gums

• Dental Implants look as natural as real teeth, support the health of surrounding teeth and don’t adversely effect other physiological systems.

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

Contact our office to come in and discuss your restoration options today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

Eat Right–Keep Your Teeth White

Eat Right–Keep Your Teeth White

Eat right, keep your teeth white–Prevent stains and discolored teeth

It’s natural to want to look good. A bright smile is certainly part of that picture. Unfortunately many social gatherings present a staggering number of food and drink options that are contrary to maintaining a white smile. Learn these tips for white teeth, despite your social engagements.

Stop discoloring and staining. Load your arsenal now with a bag of tricks to help compensate. Choose carefully and you may stop or even prevent stains. In some cases you can reverse staining from indulgent social gatherings.

Know your foe

Understanding the most likely culprits at risk for causing staining to tooth enamel helps you make an informed decision on foods to avoid. You can bet that a food that stains carpeting or clothing will also stain porous enamel. Acidic foods, tomatoes for example, make enamel softer. Soft enamel stains more readily than dense, hard enamel.

Foods that stain include, wine (red and white) blackberries, pomegranates, cranberry juice, cola, plums, blueberries, curries, vinegars (particularly dark ones,) tomato and tomato based foods. Potentially any other dark colored food with staining powers will also leave stains on your teeth.

Indirect staining -vs- direct staining

Foods can stain teeth because of their pigment. Chemical reactions contribute to staining also. Some chemical reactions from food, softens or weakens enamel . Foods that stain teeth through some combo of deep pigments and corrosive action pose an even bigger risk.

Armor for your teeth

Not all “whitening” foods directly whiten teeth. A number of foods help whiten your smile by fortifying enamel. Enamel, the hardest substance in the human body, has a porous surface. The porous surface makes teeth vulnerable to absorbing and staining causing foods we eat.

Foods that protect enamel:

  • water
  • cheese
  • walnuts, almonds and other seeds and nuts
  • sesame oil and virgin coconut oil
  • shiitake mushrooms
  • raw onion and garlic
  • salmon
  • herbs, particularly basil

These foods neutralize plaque, neutralize corrosive foods, promote saliva or remineralize enamel.

Foods that erase stains:

  • nuts and seeds
  • celery
  • carrots
  • apples
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • water
  • pineapple
  • strawberries

Fortunately all of these foods are delicious and readily available. Keep teeth white and smiles sparkling with routine brushing, flossing, and cleanings with your dentist. Add these foods in for the best defense against stains and the best offense of keeping teeth strong.

Flossing for Results

Flossing for Results

Does daily flossing effectively reduce cavities, gum disease or gingivitis?

You’re flossing. Great. Is it actually doing any good?

Amidst dozens of studies, data in favor of flossing can be hard to find, yet dentists still highly favor the practice. Careful analysis of previous studies indicate that many variables potentially influence the final result. Participants used varying methods, inconsistent technique and consistent length of flossing tended to vary a great deal.

Definitively, when trained hygienist performed flossing, outcomes were proven in several studies, demonstrating that the issues with flossing are likely due to user error and not proof that the practice has merit.

What you really need to know

How To Use Dental Floss

For dental floss to effectively remove plaque from your teeth, you need to be sure you’re using the correct technique. Because you’ll be putting your fingers into your mouth, be sure to wash your hands before you reach for the floss. Then just follow these steps:

  • Use enough floss.
    1. Break off a piece about 18 inches long.
    2. That sounds like a lot, but you want enough to keep a clean segment in place as you move from tooth to tooth.
    3. Wrap most of the floss around either the middle finger or the index finger of one hand, whichever you prefer, and a small amount onto the middle or index finger of the other hand.
    4. (Using the middle finger leaves your index finger free to manipulate the floss.)
  • Slide between teeth.
    1. Gently slide the floss between the teeth in a zigzag motion
    2. and be careful not to let the floss snap or “pop” between teeth.
  • Form a “C”.
    1. Make a C shape with the floss as you wrap it around the tooth.
    2. Then carefully pull the floss upward from the gum line to the top of the tooth.
    3. Roll along.
    4. As you move from one tooth to the next, unroll a fresh section of floss from the finger of one hand while rolling the used floss onto the finger of the other hand.
    5. Use your thumb as a guide.
  • Reach both sides.
    1. Don’t forget to floss the back side of each tooth.

As long as you use the correct technique, the type of floss you use is a matter of personal preference. There are many types to choose from, and you can even choose a variety of types to meet your needs and those of your family members. Either way, using the correct technique will help you remove the excess food particles and plaque buildup between your teeth and help improve your oral health.

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Laser surgery in dentistry

Sci-Fi has become reality and lasers are becoming readily utilized in many different medical applications. Dentistry is no exception.  For you, the patient, this means improved healing times, increased accuracy in treated areas, and best of all, reduced pain due to procedures. For dentist it means greater precision, increased patient compliance and ultimately better over all health and better outcomes for patients.

Lasers are not new in dental medicine but their applications are continually expanding.  Lightwalker lasers, used at Dr. Marilyn K. Jones, have been leading the way in advancements for almost five decades, in precision, performance, consistency, and overall perfection.

Dentists have been using special lasers in dental treatments for 4 decades. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. The light from dental lasers can be used to vaporize tissue, cut tissue, harden and enforce a bond between a filler and the remaining tooth, stop bleeding, cut away tissue or aid in whitening teeth. The precision offered with such an advanced laser is unequalled.

Why Lightwalker Lasers are Special

New innovations in surgical lasers are bringing new solutions for patients and doctors. Lasers quickly and painlessly treat a myriad of oral conditions with improved healing, improved accuracy, and less overall invasiveness. Lightwalker Fotona lasers are so accurate and reliable they can be successfully used for very delicate procedures and very specialized procedures. Used to treat some types of decay or cavities, used in gum surgery, hard and soft tissue applications, for treating gum disease and surgical, even for a nonsurgical treatment and throat anomalies — especially those related to sleep apnea. Procedures that once were invasive, with long healing times are now nominally invasive, and have a much faster healing time, with much less trauma to sensitive oral tissue.

The Benefits of our Lightwalker Fotona Dental Lasers for oral laser surgery and other procedures Include:

  • A full range of hard- and soft-tissue treatments
  • Extremely precise hard-tissue cutting and ablation
  • Easy and effective endodontic treatments
  • Little or no bleeding surgical procedures, with simultaneous disinfection
  • Easy-to-select operating modes for greater simplicity
  • Greater patient satisfaction and less operator fatigue
  • Excellent training and support for medical staff
  • Do You Need Oral Surgery or Have Sleep Apnea?

Contact our office and we can schedule you for a quick consultation to see if our surgical dental lasers can treat or help remedy your dental, oral, or sleep apnea related problems.

The Gripping Truth: Facts About Teeth Grinding

Teeth Grinding or Clenching can lead to long term health problems

Bruxism: The chronic clenching (tightly holding top and bottom teeth together) and or grinding (sliding–while clenched–back and forth) of teeth.

Occasionally or from time to time–grinding or clenching teeth–can be a normal, uneventful thing for most of people. Done on a regular or chronic basis teeth grinding and clenching will eventually be damaging to teeth, oral health, even overall health.

  • Why do people grind their teeth

The most common reasons for chronic grinding of teeth is an improper or abnormal tooth alignment, and missing or crooked teeth. In some instances Bruxism, particularly the clenching of teeth–often and long enough to cause damage–is caused by anxiety or stress.

  • How you know if you’re grinding your teeth

Typically individuals who teeth grinding are unaware of the habit because most teeth grinding occurs at night while they are asleep. Generally people learn that they grind their teeth because a family member, house-mate or loved one hears the grinding and informs them. A constant dull headache, tender jaw muscles, or sore jaw and neck muscles can be telltale of bruxism. Your dentist can help determine if you suspect bruxism by carefully inspecting the surfaces of molars and teeth for signs of scraping and excessive wear.

  • How is teeth grinding or bruxism harmful

Bruxism is a serious condition that, in addition to posing serious risks to the teeth and oral cavity, can also lead to other health conditions like TMJ, TMD even hearing loss.

The worst cases of teeth grinding, if left untreated, can loosen teeth, fracture teeth and even cause the loss of teeth. After long term grinding teeth can be worn down significantly, requiring some people to need tooth replacement or dentures. When such extensive damage occurs the jaw bone can be effected, even the contours of the face and general appearance of a person can change.

  1. Bruxism, or teeth grinding can lead to chronic pain and headaches along with damage to teeth and surrounding tissue
  2. Bruxism, or teeth grinding can lead to chronic pain and headaches along with damage to teeth and surrounding tissue
  • How to stop grinding your teeth

Many people who need to stop grinding their teeth seek their dentist for a specially made mouth guard to protect teeth, at night,from grinding.

When it has been determined that stress may be an underlying cause of bruxism, a physician may help determine options for reducing stress. Counseling, various types of therapy, and a reliable, consistent exercise program are some of the most effective an common aids in stress reduction. When needed, a patient may also employ various medications that can help with relaxing muscles and aiding in sleep.

The easiest and most common adjustments to eliminate bruxism can be done at home without anything but a few easy changes:

  1. Training yourself to relax your jaw muscle during the day. Even holding the tip of your tongue between your teeth helps to re-train jaw muscles to “unclench”.
  2. Avoid chewing gum, chewing on pens or pencils or anything except food.
    • Those habits can train jaw muscles to stay clenched and make it more likely to grind your teeth later.
  3. Cut back on caffeine, things like cola, coffee, tea and chocolate.
  4. Eliminate alcohol.
    • Consuming alcohol tends to intensify teeth grinding.

Children may grind their teeth too

While there is no clear reason why children can sometimes grind their teeth, it is somewhat common. Generally children grind their teeth at night, with increasing frequency during illnesses, or other medical conditions, (everything from nutritional deficiencies and parasites to allergies have been cited). Often the underlying cause may be irregular contact between upper and lower teeth or shifting teeth as new teeth come in or baby teeth get loose.

Baby teeth don’t typically suffer the regular problems from grinding, however children can still have jaw pain and headaches associated with bruxism. Ultimately if you suspect your child may be grinding their teeth it is definitely something to discuss with their dentist and potentially their pediatrician to evaluate any potential issues and eliminate the problem all together.