Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and flu viruses affect your oral health

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  • Dry Mouth: Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity. The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes. Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier. Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages also dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth, and bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  • Cough Drops and Medications: Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet. Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
    • To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them.  Stay adequately hydrated.
  • Fatigue: Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus. Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices. Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis. Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

 

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

Toxic Trap Inside Your Mouth

There might be a toxic trap inside your dental work

Toxins trapped inside the body, swirl around in your immune system and potentially trigger an immune response. Inflammation and infection left alone, can wreak havoc on organs and tissues and compromise an otherwise healthy body. Most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body. Poisonous, also it’s gross. 

Trapping dead, dying and bacterial colonies inside the body happen when a root canal is performed. A root canal is a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to stay alive. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised. Now the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth can abscess, continuing to decay. This decay potentially affects surrounding teeth. An affected tooth may also fall out, leading to additional problems.

The truth about root canals

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth. Blood vessel nourishing the tooth, the nerve, and pulp are extracted. Chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. The chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the new hole as possible. This process kills any remaining, viable or nonviable, rotting tissue.Essentially an embalming process for what remains of soft tissues inside the tooth.

We know after decades of research and thousands of patients that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue gets left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeates surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas. Those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues may become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As medical news around this potential hazard develops, many dentist are adopting new solutions to  addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

Due Diligence

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended–and you’re worried about a toxic trap inside your mouth–come see our team. Get all of your options. Our team can give you healthy, attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Get and Keep A Lifelong Healthy Smile

Your smile says a lot about you, not simply that you are confident or vivacious. Your smile can be a window to your overall health. Healthy gums support healthy teeth. If you have neglected to care for your gums and teeth, you may experience swollen, bleeding, even receding gums or loose teeth. Bad breath, or an unpleasant taste in your mouth may also plague you. All of these things can be a sign of gum disease.

Your To-Do List for a healthy smile

  • Don’t miss regular check-ups. An integral component of getting and maintaining healthy gums (the key to a lifelong healthy smile) is keeping plaque from accumulating on your teeth.  The sticky film, plaque, is produced when sugars and starches in food are metabolized by bacteria within the mouth. Plaque builds up between teeth and below the gumline around teeth. Eventually plaque causes inflammation and swelling. Left alone this will result in a deterioration of the bone and structures that hold teeth in place. Evidence suggests that gum disease may share a link with increased likelihood of systemic disease such as diabetes and heart disease.
  • Brush and Floss your teeth. Brushing and flossing remove food debris that bacteria use to thrive in the mouth. Fighting plaque is a constant battle as it starts to reaccumulate just hours after brushing. Brushing, including the tongue twice a day and flossing one time a day helps keep food particles from building up in the mouth. While flossing has been met with some recent controversy, experts say that flossing once a day difinitively removes particles between teeth and below gums that would otherwise feed plaque causing bacteria. Beware that smoking or chewing tobacco, stress, poor nutrition, substance abuse, diabetes, hormonal fluctuations, and certain medications can add to the risk of gum disease developing.
  • Drink and eat wisely. Water consumption adds to saliva. Slippery saliva helps keep bacteria and food from sticking to teeth. Eating whole, unprocessed foods–apples, salads, berries, pears, nuts, carrots, celery, for example–also help fortify and scrub teeth clean. Other foods like onion, cheese, and yogurt have other positive attributes from inhibiting halitosis causing bacteria, to contributing to remineralizing enamel.

Disease Progression

Gum disease has several stages, all of which gradually break down and steal a healthy smile

The mildest stage of gum disease, gingivitis, results from poor or inconsistent oral hygiene.  Gingivitis is a treatable and reversible form of gum disease. Gingivitis occurs when plaque accumulates and hardens over time. The chronic inflammation and bacterial process eventually break down and damage surrounding soft tissues. In order to properly treat gingivitis your dentist will clean the affected areas and remove plaque, depending on how significant the deposits of plaque are this stage could potentially be uncomfortable.

If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontitis. Periodontitis, a more serious condition in which the bacteria in the mouth trigger a systemic immune response. The entire immune system kicks in to try and fight the substantial bacteria load inside the mouth. This progressive disease process can lead to damage jaw bone and connective tissue around the teeth.

Protect you healthy smile with daily maintenance and regular check-ups. You will be rewarded for your consistent efforts.

 

 

 

The Fluoride Debate

The Fluoride Debate:  To Use Fluoride Or Not To Use Fluoride

Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

The Debate: Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

You can find a professional opinion at every turn regarding the argument: To Fluoride or Not To Fluoride. The topic “to use fluoride” or “not to use fluoride” should be less confusing.  One simple answer.  A nice and neat, black and white answer is what we need.  Historically, in science, black and white are not something easily come by.  Currently the ongoing argument finds dentist on the defense weather they are pro fluoride or anti-fluoride.

Why The Debate?

Fluoride has been a staple of the American dental regimine and dentist recommendations since the 1950’s. You don’t have to look long, or hard to see why that protocol fell into place. Communities with naturally fluoridated water supplies had drastically lower rates of decay, sometimes as low as 30% lower than non fluoridated communities. Enter fluoride’s stampede into the american household. Fluoride found it’s way into toothpaste, mouthwash, baby vitamins, and municipal water supplies across the country.  Today more than two thirds of americans are currently receiving artificially fluoridated water at their faucet. Additionally some of their foods, toothpaste, many mouthwashes and supplements can contain fluoride.

Naturally occurring fluoride is a mineral called calcium fluoride, found in various places around the world it readily absorbs into ground water in trace amounts.  Communities with naturally occurring calcium fluoride, a mineral found in various regions around the world, have consistently demonstrated lower incidence of tooth decay so the argument seemed sound.  Except that the fluoride added to municipal water supplies all around the country is not naturally occurring calcium fluoride.

Municipal water that is fluoridated today essentially is an chemical waste product. The entire argument for the use of fluoride is based on studies in communities with naturally occurring mineral deposits of calcium fluoride. Recent studies from communities with artificially fluoridated water have not been able to backup or substantiate the original findings of reduced dental decay and cavity incident.

Fluoride is a Toxin

Many Americans are aware that fluoride is a toxin, yet somehow we look past the fact that a tube of toothpaste easily contains enough fluoride to kill a small child. As consumers we’ve educated ourselves about all kinds of toxins that find their way into our bodies, even switching out the containers in our homes to eradicate exposure to BPA’s and other known chemicals with potential to harm.

Fluoride is not an unknown. Science has linked fluoride exposure to cancer, complications with diabetes, dementia, arthritis, mental defects, alzheimer’s, birth defects and a whole myriad of other complications. Still we have not eliminated or reduced our exposure, our children’s exposure or the eventual overload to the environment to the toxins of fluoride.

Since fluoride is nearly impossible to filter out of water the best option to reduce exposure is to get it out of toothpaste and mouthwash products in your home. There are alternatives that are very effective, maybe more so than fluoride, at remineralizing enamel and strengthening teeth. In essence fluoride only effectively works topically, unless teeth are still forming below the gum line, otherwise ingesting fluoride serves no purpose and, in fact, is toxic.

In the long list of everyday things people come into contact with that are toxic, potentially even deadly, fluoride should not be overlooked or separated out from worst offenders. Fluoride hurts people.  In many cases it is forced on us through regimented doses in public water systems.

Alternatives to Fluoride

There are ways to help ensure tooth enamel stays strong and resilient while avoiding fluoride products. Individuals may focus on foods that are especially good at remineralizing teeth, eliminate specific foods that soften and wear out enamel and use products like xylitol that have shown potential in remineralizing and protecting enamel. These are just a few of the options when it comes to eliminating a toxic substance and continuing to protect your teeth and overall health.

Contact our office for products and information about alternatives to fluoride.

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants that actually look great

Ceramic Implants are the best choice, hands-down, when it comes to looking just like your own, natural, teeth. As a patient, you have a choice when it comes to replacing a tooth–from prostheses and bridges to permanent dental implants, options abound.  For most patients and doctors, implants top the list. Why? In addition to their functional benefits, implants are also practical, durable, and much more pleasing aesthetically.

At our office with Dr Marilyn K Jones DDS, we prefer ceramic implants. Their use is outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate.

Ceramic Implants are Strong

The material in theses permanent dental implants is zirconia, a ceramic that is extruded from Zirconium, is biologically inert in the human body and has a high tensile strength (meaning it is very strong). But what makes the difference for many patients is the aesthetics: zirconia implants are considered the most realistic looking tooth replacement option available on the market. And let’s face it: we all want our teeth to look good.

Straightforward Implementation

Since ceramic permanent dental implants can so closely match the look and feel of natural teeth, they immediately lend a sense of confidence to the patient. There is no denture to mess with, no embarrassing creams or gels, and no speech issues associated with tooth loss and tooth replacement that are often associated with dentures or other prostheses. There are no restrictions on diet and eating habits, no risk of losing the implant or damaging it while eating. The recipient of a ceramic dental implant also reduces the chance of bone loss in the jaw resulting in the potential of additional dental issues and a diminished jaw-line.

No Negative Side Effects

While the option to use metal implant post, made from titanium, stainless steel or other alloys, for permanent implants can still be performed, this option has aesthetic drawbacks.  Metal posts were the traditional material used in implants for decades, but they leave a silver-grey color along the gumline, making it obvious that your tooth has been replaced.  White implants made from zirconia don’t have that issue: not only are they the same color as your teeth, they actually promote soft tissue growth, meaning that the chance of receding gums are reduced, as well. With metal implants, the gums can’t grow properly, leading to a distinguishable line at base of the new tooth. Even if you experience slight gum loss with ceramic implants, there is no dark metallic line visible at the gum line.

Zirconia, ceramic implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth, they do not absorb stains from food or discolor over time. Ceramic implants can last a lifetime and retain their shape and color for the duration. They can be used for one or a few missing teeth or to anchor other prostheses when appropriate.  They are bioinert and will not absorb odor, resist plaque, and are as easy to maintain as real teeth.

Ceramic Implants Last a Lifetime

Implants are permanent: make sure you find a skilled, experienced doctor to place one.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

 

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Titanium Restorations.

Today the average adult, in America, will face the permanent loss of 3 or more adult teeth in their lifetime. That statistic has been cut in half over the last few decades and modern dentistry has been a big catalyst for the improvement.  When an adult tooth is extracted due to injury or decay, the best scenario sees that tooth replaced with a permanent implant, traditionally that has been done with titanium posts.

Restoration services can be performed with a variety of materials. The most common, older versions, were constructed from titanium with a ceramic or other composite ‘cap’ covering the anchor as the replacement “tooth”. With the advent of new materials and new technology titanium and metal implants are gradually becoming old school, being replaced by full ceramic options.

Why Change To Ceramics?

Titanium’s track record shows a long history of strong, resilient wear. Titanium was initially believed to be the perfect material to provide safe, long lasting and strong anchors for tooth restoration. Now, after decades of use, medical information and scientific evidence have uncovered a truth that was unforeseen: Titanium can be toxic when left in the body, it is not inert, corrodes over time, and is not the very effective at promoting tissue regrowth.

Though not all individuals are sensitive to titanium, or metals found in other types of metal implants, the consequences for those who are sensitive can be devastating, potentially life threatening. While the worst reactions remain relatively uncommon, lesser reactions and sensitivities are more common and still of concern.

Ceramics Enter the Dental Community After Years of Use Medically

Enter the full ceramic implant. Ceramic tooth restorations are naturally the whitest and brightest. You will never experience discoloring or the drawback of gum tissues around the base of the ceramic tooth restoration, they are easily the vanity choice. Being the best, most realistic option is nice, but it’s not why they are the new gold standard for dentists everywhere.

For decades the medical community have successfully used ceramics in other parts of the body: Hips, knees, and spine to name a few. The long success of ceramics in surgical implants spelled good news to the dental community. At last an option with more than thirty years of documented success.

Ceramics are bio-inert, making them naturally biocompatible.  Ceramic will not corrode, conduct heat or cold, never discolors, and has virtually the same strength as titanium, the old standard. This benefit has been one of the primary factors in dentists preference in ceramics. The biocompatibility equates to long term success and overall improved bone stability and retention in the jaw. Plus a much better retention, or regeneration of soft tissue or gum tissue to support the nearby surrounding healthy teeth.

Ceramic Restorations Raise the Bar

Ceramic restorations are the most compatible with the body’s immune system. They support healthy bone regrowth in areas damaged from trauma or decay, more so than any other option.  Restorations from ceramics consistently demonstrate improved bone regrowth, even gingival attachment and regrowth.  Since ceramics are so good at promoting hard and soft tissue regrowth it’s of little surprise that they are resistant to corrosion at a much higher standard than their metal counterparts. Ceramics do not absorb into tissues or into the bloodstream and won’t corrode over time. That fact further boosts the desirability of ceramics as a restoration option.

These facts have elevated ceramic tooth restorations to a prime choice for dental practices who put their patients long term health and well being as their number one priority.

If you have questions, would like a consult or are ready to schedule your appointment please contact us.

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

Metals in dental restorations have a potential link to overall health inadequacies. Metals compromise immune systems in sensitive individuals.

Multiple studies correlate metal sensitivities to a battery of autoimmune diseases and several processes that critical in running the bodies delicately balanced endocrine system. Ultimately the thyroid, pancreas, and other critical hormone systems are typically most affected.

All metals (titanium, nickel, steel, silver and other alloys)used in dental procedures, weather for implants or abutments, fillings or dentures, will eventually begin to corrode. As time passes corroding metal particles become ions binding to proteins inside the body’s individual cells. Due to blood vessels creating a perfect transportation system, metal particles can readily travel throughout the body. For some individuals these “foreign invaders” set off a chain reaction within the immune system. As the immune system goes on high alert and begins attacking various parts of the body numerous symptoms arise. Consequently various internal systems may begin to fail.

Symptoms to metal implants vary from patient to patient. Often including an oral burning sensation, general fatigue, skin rashes, a constant dull pain and in some cases, loss of the implant. A paper published in July of 2011 focused on titanium allergy in patients who have undergone an implant, it concluded in part; “This review of the literature indicates that titanium can induce hypersensitivity in susceptible patients and could play a critical role in implant failure.”

Who Cares

What impact, if any, will metals have on you? No one can say for certain. Even petients with existing metal components in their mouth risk that there will be a tipping point. When the level of adsorbed metal becomes more than the immune system will tolerate. Most noteworthy, time plays a factor. As time passes more and more ions can be absorbed so that the effects of metal toxins might not be evident for years.

Great New Options

z-systems zirconia dental implants

ceramics used in dental implants are non-metallic and white throughout

With Zirconium, or all ceramic implants, there is never a risk of being slowly poisoned. Ceramic dental implants do not corrode. They will not absorb or dissolve in any way, as a result, there’s no need to consider long term replacements as they can last a lifetime with the same regular hygiene your natural teeth need.

Call today for a consult and to learn more about your choices and about implants that are customized to benefit your long term health.

MKJones Newest Slider 4

Overlooked Smile Fixes You Can DIY

Overlooked Smile Fixes You Can DIY

Often overlooked DIY smile fixes

With so many good options for keeping our mouths healthy sometimes it gets hard to keep track of it all. Often with rhetoric about commercial products to improve smiles and white teeth we can lose track of the simple steps we can integrate for free, that often exceed any of the other good choices for providing long term strength and health to a beautiful smile.

1.) Brushing

I guess we can start with the most obvious. Often we feel like we are doing an adequate job with our brushing but it’s my experience that most people will cut short their standard “two minute” brush times, everyday or almost everyday. If you are an ardent follower of this rule then pat yourself on the back. The next most common brushing failure is cutting out one of your normal brushes (recommended twice daily) Patients who will admit this say it happens rarely once or twice a month.

Get the most out of your brushing. Don’t cut short your brush times, don’t skip it on a late night,  don’t’ skip replacing your toothbrush at regular intervals, all of these abuses take a toll on our mouths over time. Finally a reminder that you can skip all the fancy, fangled toothpaste with sparkles, added colors, gimmicks and chemicals to help you think it works better, try an easy, really good homemade brush paste to get your whitest smile without chemicals.

2.) Flossing

Again another obvious step to a healthy mouth. While flossing might seem unsurprising and should be a routine part of our daily hygiene, it is largely ignored or skipped by patients. Note that flossing can remove as much plaque, food particles and biofilm from teeth as brushing AFTER you’ve finished brushing.

When done properly flossing involves wrapping the floss around three sides of the tooth being flossed and using a “sawing” motion up and down the surface of the tooth all the way into the gum line. Flossing can play a big factor in stopping gum recession and periodontal disease. Floss your teeth, all of them, at least one time daily.

3.) Drink More Water.

Having adequate hydration and sufficient saliva help create a barrier for to protect teeth and gums.

DIY smile enhancers require adequate hydration and sufficient saliva help create a barrier for to protect teeth and gums.

Maybe this grabbed you by surprise.  Water is perhaps our greatest asset in our whole body’s defense against disease and this analogy holds true even more so inside our mouths. Adequate amounts of saliva are your mouth’s best defense against the food particles feeding bacteria and against the bacteria themselves. The best way to make sure you have enough fresh, slippery, slimy, beneficial saliva?  Take your body weight and divide it by two, this give you the recommended number of ounces you need to drink of water, daily to stay adequately hydrated, more if you sweat, its really hot outside or you drink caffeine. Go and get a glass of water to drink while you finish the rest of this article. I’ll wait.

4.) Cut Down on Alcohol, Quit using Nicotine.

Smoking has an immediate and lasting effect on the bodies circulatory system. Changes in blood pressure and heart rate can affect your overall health but in your mouth these processes comprise the tissues and the blood flow to vital nerves and tissues. The tar and smoke and nicotine interrupt the natural process that saliva plays in keeping your gums and teeth healthy.  Pair this with the increased temperature from the inhalation of smoke (if you are smoking vs other nicotine forms) and it is the perfect storm to impede the natural ability of the mouth to heal itself.

Drinking alcohol also introduces harmful chemicals to the body. Alcohol, like smoking dries the oral tissues and impairs the natural process of the saliva that is there to protect the teeth. The acidic nature of alcohol invariably weakens and erodes away the protective enamel on the outside of the teeth, thus teeth become even more susceptible to decay. Decay leads to gum disease and bone loss.

Limit alcohol consumption and stop smoking. Long term these are two of the most measurable things you can do for your body’s overall health AND your mouth’s health.

5.) Sleep! 

Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night reduces inflammation and improves overall health, improving oral health and reducing gum disease

DIY simple smile fixes require plenty of sleep for long term maintenance

In a four year study of over two hundred patients the largest factor contributing to gum/periodontal disease after smoking was lack of sleep. Those patients receiving six or less hours of sleep had a more rapid progression of disease and inflammation.  Surprisingly when subjects increased their average hours of sleep up to seven or eight hours of sleep their gum disease decreased or slowed measurably.

Call our office now at (713) 785-7767 to schedule your next appointment. We look forward to meeting you and earning your trust.

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Can you sleep your way to a better smile? 

Grandma called it beauty sleep and you shrugged, even rolled your eyes but recent research shows that adequate sleep can hold off and slow down the effects of stress, age and all kinds of wear and tear on the body, even help with weight loss, but did you know it is also one of the greatest factors to having and keeping a beautiful smile? Getting a good night’s rest can do a lot more than preserve your good looks.

Studies can link a relationship of good sleeping habits to better heart health, lower blood pressure, and decreased incidence of diabetes, now add to that list improved gum and mouth health.  To thousands who suffer from periodontal disease, at any stage, that signals good news.

The Link Between Sleep and Oral Health 

Reduce inflammation with adequate sleep to improve oral health and get a beautiful smile.

Reduce inflammation with sleep to improve oral health

The less sleep you get per night relates to the onset of periodontitis–a disease in which deep pockets form between the teeth and gums, leading to loose and shifting teeth, and the destruction of the bone and connective tissue which hold teeth in place.

A study at the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine examined over 200 factory workers to assess whether various lifestyle factors (i.e. exercise, diet, stress) had an effect on periodontitis. Throughout the four year-study, researchers used periodontal probes to monitor any changes in the pockets between teeth and gums.

According to the findings, workers who slept seven to eight hours per night were had a lower risk for periodontitis than those who slept less than six hours per night.  In fact, sleep deprivation was the second most influential factor associated with the onset of periodontitis, right behind smoking.

Lack of Sleep and Inflammation

The root of this association is most likely inflammation. Sleep deprivation is a known cause of increased inflammation, which in turn is a risk factor for other serious diseases like heart disease and stroke.

Research at the Emory University School of Medicine found that, when you are sleep deprived, there is an increased production of inflammatory hormones.  One such inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein, was 25% higher in subjects who had less than six hours of sleep per night.

In addition to being a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, inflammation is also a sign of gingivitis, the mild form of gum disease that can lead to periodontitis.

Get A Good Night’s Sleep

It’s not how long, but how well you sleep that counts too.  Even if you get a full eight hours each night, you don’t get the same health benefits if you wake up often.

A few tips for those that have trouble getting a good night’s rest:

Routine: Your body clock wants to adjust to your needs, but it cannot adjust if those needs are always changing. Establishing a routine alerts the body that this is the time you need to go to sleep.

Wind-down without your electronics: Giving yourself time to wind-down before you sleep helps your mind relax. There are many different ways to wind-down, whether it’s reading, yoga, or sipping a cup of hot tea. Just be sure not to use electronics. The latest research shows that artificial light from laptops, TV’s, and iPhones suppress the hormone which regulates sleep, melatonin.

Get up instead of tossing and turning: You want to keep your bedroom associated with sleep rather than being awake. So if you are tossing and turning, get up and do a relaxing activity until you feel tired again. Then try and go back to sleep.

To offset some of the inevitable lack of sleep when things get way too busy and remember to:

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Trouble; Toxins and Root Canals

What root canals are really leaving behind. Toxins, trapped inside the body, swirling around inside your body, attacking your immune system and potentially triggering an immune response or inflammation. Ultimately wreaking havoc on organs and tissues, compromising an otherwise healthy body. These are the facts of getting a root canal.

Ask anyone, most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body.

A morgue in your mouth

Trapping dead, and dying tissues and bacterial colonies locked inside the body is exactly what happens when a patient gets a root canal, a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive, or viable. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised and the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth may abscess, continue to decay–potentially affecting surrounding teeth or it may fall out, leading to additional problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and to kill any remaining, viable or nonviable tissue. This equates to essentially embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarentee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case there is always necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas, but those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues can become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.