No More Unwanted Tattoos

No More Unwanted Tattoos

No Gum Tattoos

With ceramic implants there will never be grey or silver showing through. Ceramic never no discolors or tattoos surrounding soft tissue. Nothing beats ceramic implants for tooth replacement.

Hands-down, when it comes to looking just like your own, natural, teeth nothing compares like an all ceramic implant. As a patient,  it’s up to you when it comes to replacing a tooth. From prostheses and bridges to permanent dental implants, options abound.  For most patients and doctors, implants top the list.  In addition to their functional benefits, implants are also practical, durable, and much more pleasing aesthetically.

At our office with Dr Marilyn K Jones DDS, we prefer ceramic implants. Using ceramic is outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate.

Ceramic Implants are Strong

The material in theses permanent dental implant [zirconia], a ceramic that is extruded from Zirconium, is biologically inert in the human body. Zirconia also has a high tensile strength (meaning it is very strong). What really makes the difference for many patients is the aesthetics. Ceramic/zirconia implants are considered the most realistic looking tooth replacement option available on the market. Face it, we all want our teeth to look good. Healthy gums with no silver tattoos look healthiest.

Straightforward Implementation

Ceramic permanent dental implants so closely match the look and feel of natural teeth, they immediately lend a sense of confidence to the patient.

  • There is no denture to mess with, no embarrassing creams or gels.
  • No speech issues associated with tooth loss and tooth replacement, often associated with dentures or other prostheses.
  • There are no restrictions on diet and eating habits.
  • No risk of losing the implant or damaging it while eating.
  • Having a ceramic dental implant also reduces the chance of bone loss in the jaw.
    • Bone loss results lead to a number of additional dental issues and a diminished jaw-line.

No Negative Side Effects

Metal posted implants–made from titanium, stainless steel or other alloys–for permanent implants can still be performed. In addition to potential health concerns, metal posted implants have aesthetic drawbacks.  The metal material traditionally used in implants (for decades), is still available but leaves a silver-grey color along the gum line. The discoloration makes it obvious that your tooth has been replaced.

White implants made from zirconia don’t have that issue. Not only are they the same color as your teeth, they actually promote soft tissue growth This means any chance of receding gums are reduced, as well. With metal implants, the gums can’t grow properly, leading to a distinguishable line at base of the new tooth. Even if you experience slight gum loss with ceramic implants, there’ll never be a dark metallic line at the gum line.

  • Zirconia, ceramic implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth,
  • They do not absorb stains from food
  • Implants will not discolor over time
  • Ceramic implants can last a lifetime
  • They retain their shape and color for the duration
  • They can be used for one tooth replacement
  • An implant can replace multiple teeth few
  • Implants can also anchor prosthetics like denture in the jaw
  • They are bio-inert
  • Implants will not absorb odor,
  • Zerconia/ceramic implants also resist plaque
  • Dental implants, made from ceramic, are also as easy to maintain as real teeth

Ceramic Implants Last a Lifetime

Implants are permanent: make sure you find a skilled, experienced doctor to place one.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

 

Metal Allergy and Dental Health

Metal Allergy and Dental Health

Metal dental implants were originally made out of commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy, providing the only option for implant tooth restoration for many years. After years of study, we now know that placing metallic dental implants and other restorative devices can potentially provoke allergic reactions. One study involving 1,500 patients demonstrated that although rare, titanium allergy could be clearly detected in dental implant patients. One research paper published in 2010 indicated that “…the risk of an allergy to titanium is increased in patients who are allergic to other metals. In these patients, an evaluation of allergy is recommended, in order to exclude any problem with titanium medical devices.” Further research on the subject noted a higher risk of positive allergic reaction was found in patients whose implants failed for no other known reason other than that they had a higher incidence of allergic reaction.

Who cares about allergies?

Metal allergies are suspected by researchers and holistic dentists alike of being one of the most likely culprits behind the growing number of cases of autoimmune diseases in the United States including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Psoriasis, and Scleroderma, Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and many others. A correlation between metal allergies and a weakened immune system suggests that it is not only important but imperative to take the necessary precautions to ensure that patients are biocompatible before allowing any substance or material to be permanently affixed into the mouth.

There’s more to titanium than you might think

Screw and abutments used in dental implants can be made from the same alloy, but frequently a combination of alloys are used including small amounts of nickel and gold. One of the more commonly reported metal allergies in dental patients is to nickel, which explains why anyone with known sensitivities to metals would be vulnerable to the side effects of titanium implants. Symptoms to metal implants can vary from patient to patient and often include oral burning sensation, general fatigue, skin rashes, a constant dull pain and in some cases loss of the implant. A paper published in July of 2011 focused on titanium allergy in patients who have undergone an implant, and it concluded in part; “This review of the literature indicates that titanium can induce hypersensitivity in susceptible patients and could play a critical role in implant failure.”

Titanium allergy is rarely documented in mainstream medicine however, it has been reported that about four percent of all patients tested will be allergic to titanium. For those affected with a titanium allergy, the symptoms can be quite intense and somewhat confusing ranging from simple skin rashes to deep muscle pain and overall fatigue – common systems for an immune system that perceives itself under attack.

The known effects of titanium allergy

Like all metals used in the medical field today titanium releases tiny particles as it begins to corrode. In the case of an implant, these metal particles become ions and bind to proteins found naturally throughout the body. In some people the body reacts to metal particles in the same way it does to a virus or other foreign substance and it will try to attack the ‘invader’. This starts a chain reaction which can lead to many symptoms including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Allergy Testing – An Important Part of the Whole

Our unique focus on dental health takes into consideration a patient’s oral health in relation to the whole body, including identifying and treating issues pertaining to allergies and autoimmune disorders.

That is why we consider ceramic dental implants to be the better and safest alternative to metal implants. The advantage of these implants is that they are ceramic, and thus there is no concern of corrosion, allergic reaction or electronic interference.

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

For some of us, having a perfect smile seems like a far away dream

If you have ever had a missing tooth–one or more–consider yourself a candidate for implants. Even if you are missing multiple teeth, implants can support a crown or bridge replacing those teeth. Implants function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, implants may be placed to fix a permanent, in place, full-mouth fixture or denture.

Often the process of getting a dental restoration seems overwhelming, read on to get answers to important concerns.

How to get a bridge -vs- how to get an implant

Bridge: Conventional Dental Bridge Placement requires modifying adjacent tooth

Getting fitted for a denture bridge requires the manual modification of the teeth on either side the bridge. This process significantly weakens adjacent teeth. In order to fit a conventional bridge the structure of the existing teeth has to be ground down to support the false bridge. This practice weakens adjacent teeth.

Dental implants do not affect the health or longevity of neighboring teeth at all, in fact implants support the health of surrounding teeth. Once established, implants are firmly set into the bone making them more natural than dentures or conventional bridges, with none of the shifting that dentures normally display.

Some problems with conventional bridges

• Since they are bonded to the adjacent tooth with a glue-like substance, bridges more often become loose and fall out

• Cracks and fissures form over time, due to normal wear and tear, causing them to become fragile and prone to breakage

• Surrounding soft tissue, and often bone, recedes leaving less support to adjacent teeth

• Improper fit can lead to either tooth decay or irritation to the surrounding sensitive tissue in the mouth

No such problems with implants

Ceramic dental implants are recommended to patients because:

Permanent solutions for your dental restoration
• Chewing is easy with excellent biting pressure provided by implant

• Dental Implants have a good reputation for providing reliable and long-standing service, providing decades of use with few, if any complications

• Comfortable fit and durability because they are well secured and integrated with the bone and gums

• Dental Implants look as natural as real teeth, support the health of surrounding teeth and don’t adversely effect other physiological systems.

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

Contact our office to come in and discuss your restoration options today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

Cold and flu tax your oral health too

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  1. Dry Mouth:
    • Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity.
    • The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes.
    • Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier.
      • Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth,
      • And bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  2. Cough Drops and Medications:
    • Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet.
    • Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
      To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them. Stay adequately hydrated.
  3. Fatigue:
    • Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus.
    • Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices.
    • Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis.
    • Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

Single Day Tooth Replacement: Fact Sheet

Single Day Tooth Replacement: Fact Sheet

Ceramic Implants Done For Best Potential Outcome:
Multi-visit placement vs single day implant

You need a dental restoration. Some dental practices advertise single day restorations. Instant dental implants and no required follow ups for additional treatments.

Ceramic implants, far and away, are the best looking, strongest, healthiest, and most natural option for tooth replacement.

  • Any concerns about longevity or durability have been put to rest since ceramic options can last as long as natural, healthy, teeth.
  • Add to that how much ceramic implants actually increase the viability and vitality of your whole mouth in comparison to other replacement options and the choice was made for you.

You may be considering your options for the restorative procedure itself. There are dentists who offer  single day implants. A one day visit to fix everything. Most dentists however, prefer several visits to complete the implant, restoration processes.

You might wonder if it matters

The promise of instant gratification and less planning or scheduling is tempting.

  • You are considering if it really makes a difference in the outcome.
  • It’s comforting to hope that such a big procedure could be over and done in a single day.
  • That may be part of the reason single day visits are offered.
    • We are programmed to go looking for the easy button, instant gratification.

Word of warning

The science and research indicates one major factor contributting to implant failure is not allowing time for bone and soft tissues to heal before completing the procedure.

Do your mouth a favor and give it the proper time to heal.

A ceramic implant is anchored in the jaw bone. Depending on several factors, including the number of teeth to be restored and the quality and quantity of bone material, you may be able to start with the initial procedure being the anchor itself.

In some instances there may be recommended procedures to do prior to implanting the anchor in order to ensure proper bone mass and health. Afterwards the anchor is given adequate time for the bone around it to heal and be strongly attached. There may be a follow up exam to confirm this. The next step is placing a new, ceramic, fixed, permanent tooth.

Invest in Your Health

Most implant procedures are very predictable and your skilled dentist can make the entire procedure nearly effortless. It’s worth the wait to know you’ve got the most advanced, successful system. You are investing time to ensure the best outcome, giving yourself the best odds of a restoration that will last your entire life and look great doing it. Lets face it, this was no small decision and you should know, you’ve done your research. When you come in to see us we will be happy to work with you to find the best time and availability to fit your schedule.

The entire implant process requires very specialized, advanced equipment and training.

  • We have the training,
  • the expertise
  • and are ready to give you the smile you deserve.

While in our care all aspects of your overall health will be taken into consideration, your comfort, health, convenience, investment and satisfaction matter to us.

Bio-Inert Ceramic Implants: Invest in your health

Bio-Inert Ceramic Implants: Invest in your health

Bio-Inert ceramic implants: not just for perfect smiles

Ceramic implants are the restoration of choice for any missing teeth. They are strong, they support surrouding teeth and they are permanent. While metal implants cannot provide as many perks as ceramic implants, many dental patients gravitate to them if cost is an issue.

Bio-inert ceramic, an investment in your health, not only your mouth

As a patient, you have a choice when it comes to replacing a tooth. For patients and doctors, implants top the list and ceramic implants are at the top of that list. The reasons are clear when presented with all the facts.

  • Ceramic implants will not leach metals into the body or surrounding tissue.
  • Ceramic implants are bio-inert.
    • No risk of the body’s immune system rejecting them
    • Ceramic implants can last an entire life without wearing our or corroding.
    • Even sensitive immune systems will not react to a ceramic dental implant.
    • Ceramic will not leach into the surrounding tissues.
    • Ceramic implants will not break-down and enter the bloodstream.
  • Bio-inert ceramic implants support strong bone growth.
    • Ensuring the implant and surrounding teeth stay put.
  • Bio-inert ceramic implants allow for substantial support of soft tissues.
    • With Metal implants, soft tissues often recede over time allowing the metal to show at the base of the teeth.
  • Bio-inert ceramic implants are pure, there are no other chemicals, derivatives, ores or ingredients that effect what you get versus what another patient gets.
    • Many titanium implants are not pure titanium and can contain other metal ores, nickel included.
  • Bio-inert ceramic implants are nonporous.
    • Bacterial colonies are unable to stick to the smooth, non corrosive surface.

Bio-inert Ceramics promote the best health of body, mind and mouth

At our office with Dr Marilyn K Jones DDS, we prefer bio-inert ceramic implants, also known as zirconium or zirconia, and their use is outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate. In addition to their functional benefits, bio-inert ceramic, implants are also practical, durable, and much more pleasing aesthetically: we all want our teeth to look good. Thats easy. Now its easy to make the best choice for beauty and health. Ceramic implants are for both options.

Zirconia, bio-inert ceramic, implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth, they do not absorb stains from food or discolor over time. Ceramic implants can last a lifetime and retain their shape and color for the duration. They can be used for one or a few missing teeth or to anchor other prostheses when appropriate. They are bioinert, will not absorb odor, they resist plaque, and are as easy to maintain as real teeth.
Implants are permanent: make sure you find a skilled, experienced doctor to place one.

At Marilyn K Jones, we have the skills, experience, and expertise you demand to ensure a healthy, natural, functional tooth replacement.

professional opinion

Mental Health, Your Mouth and Fluoride

Mental Health, Your Mouth and Fluoride

Mental health fitness: your oral health may be linked more than you know

Mental Health means a lot of different things. There are mental health issues that are tied to genetics and mental health issues affected by age, experience, general health and a barrage of other factors. Consider that, for most otherwise healthy individuals, many conditions our body and minds experience are closely tied to a variety many parts of our lives. Environment, health, diet, genetics, amount of sleep, even physical exercise have been shown to affect our mental health. How does the health of your mouth relate to these things?

The mouth is a vector to the rest of the body, and mind. Everything that enters the mouth enters the body via the gastro (stomach) system or directly through the thin, permeable skin inside the mouth.  Consequently toxins from pesticides, chemicals, metals and other harmful substances can go directly into the bloodstream. After prolonged exposure enough of any toxin can build up. This is how metals from dental work, even fluoride, can eventually affect peoples physical, even mental health.

Fluoride as it relates to mental health

For decades many generations of Americans have believed that healthy smiles are dependent on the use of fluoride.  There are many opinions from many different professionals regarding fluoride, just ask. To develop a broader understanding of the fluoride issue look at the various facts about fluoride. Particularly in relation to how it affects a persons mental health.

When it all started

Ever since the 1950’s American dentist have been recommending preventative fluoride treatment.  For decades dentist noticed that community with natural supplies of fluoride in the water had significantly less incidents of tooth decay. Cue the flood of fluoride into the American household. What started as an additive to community water supplies ended up being in toothpaste, mouthwash, baby supplements, even foods that are canned using water supplies fluoridated. All of this resulting in two thirds of the American municipal water supply being treated with added fluoride, and a barrage of healthcare products, supplements and even some foods.

When fluoride occurs naturally, a mineral called calcium fluoride, trace amounts of it absorb over time into ground water. The mineral-calcium fluoride-routinely shows up in natural water supplies and surrounding community population demonstrate lower incidence of cavities. Adding fluoride in its natural form to municipal water supplies would seem like the thing a good argument. Except that the fluoride added to municipal water does not occur naturally.

Fluoride added to water today comes from chemical waste products.  A debate to add fluoride to water bases all research on communities with natural fluoride. No substantial evidence has shown chemical waste derived fluoride to reduce dental decay.

How this relates to mental health

Fluoride is a Toxin.

Across the country adults are aware of the inherent danger in fluoride exposure. Children can easily overdose, pets can get sick. We withhold toothpaste with fluoride to infants and young children. American consumers educate themselves on many toxins that find their way into homes and foods, even avoiding plastics in foods, BPA’s, over processed foods and pesticides. Yet fluoride gets a green light.

“Fluoride is not an unknown. Science has linked fluoride exposure to cancer, complications with diabetes, dementia, arthritis, mental defects, alzheimer’s, birth defects and a whole myriad of other complications. Still we have not eliminated or reduced our exposure, our children’s exposure or the eventual overload to the environment to the toxins of fluoride.”

Knowing that fluoride can be so toxic and detrimental many educated consumers are choosing to reduce and eliminate as much fluoride as possible from our bodies.

Alternatives to Fluoride

There are ways to help tooth enamel stay strong and resilient while avoiding fluoridated products. Focusing on foods that are especially good at remineralizing teeth, eliminate or reduce food or drinks that soften and wear out enamel. Products like xylitol have shown potential in remineralizing and protecting enamel. These are just a few of the options when it comes to eliminating a toxic substances while continuing to protect your teeth and overall health both mental and physical.

Contact our office for products and information about alternatives to fluoride.

Ref:

50 Reasons to Oppose Fluoridation

Ten Things To Rev Up Your Good Oral Health

Good Oral Health: Ten Ways To Ensure The Strongest Teeth

“The baby boomers will be the first U.S. generation to age while maintaining their natural dentition.”

So often the health of our teeth is taken for granted. Advances in dentistry, prevention, and health care have greatly improved good oral health of millions of Americans to a point where an entire generation of baby boomers are about to set a new bench mark. More of us are keeping our natural teeth or the majority of our natural teeth through our entire life.

As Medical studies have born-out, good oral health is directly linked to good overall health. It stands to reason that our general health benefits from paying close attention to, and taking adequate care of our teeth.

Your Count Down To Stronger, Healthier Teeth and Tip-Top Oral Health

  1. Brush daily. Brushing your teeth, tongue and the roof of your mouth is paramount. For the best brushing spend 2 to 3 minutes on the entire mouth. Use a tooth brush that is less than 3 months old. Older toothbrushes have straight, un-freyed, and are clean from debris. Always try to brush two times a day and rinse mouth after meals and in between brushing.
  2. Flossing daily. Flossing has been hotly contested recently but dentist still maintain that, done properly, it is one of the most effective ways to clean between teeth and at the gum-line.  Floss should be about 12-15 inches long and a new section of floss should be used as you proceed to the next tooth. Floss should remain taught and attention to an even, gentle sawing motion down from the top to gum-line. It’s important to not “saw” or slam into the gum and soft tissues but to purposefully clean between the teeth.
  3. Clean your tongue every morning.There are various tools that can be used to “tongue scrape” or wipe off the excess film that collects in the crevices of the back of the tongue.
  4. Look at the overall picture. Teeth need to be straight. Crowed teeth provide more hiding places for bacterial colonies that lead to bad breath and plaque build up.
  5. Stop using tobacco. Smoking and oral tobacco both significantly contribute to staining. Worst of all they cause oral cancer and other maladies that contribute to periodontal disease and tooth loss.
  6. Drink more. Water that is. Drinking water flushes the mouth, helps keep it clean and you hydrated. Being hydrated ensures good saliva production, in-turn protecting teeth.  That means drinking less coffee, soda, juices and alcohol. Coffee and soda have sulfurs and contain may also contain sugars both of which contribute to weaker teeth, cavities and staining.
  7. Eat a variety of colorful and nutrient dense foods. Certain foods actually help remineralize teeth. calcium dense foods, nuts, cheeses, leafy greens, crunchy fruits and vegetables all contribute to stronger enamel, stronger gums, and better oral health.
  8. Don’t’ skip the dentist. Every visit that the dentist finds that everything in your mouth is healthy potentially pushes off a visit that could have been a problem visit.  Regular check-ups and cleanings are the key to cheaper visits and healthier teeth.
  9. If you see something or feel something, say something. The minute something feels wrong inside your mouth, call your dentist. Chances are that things won’t get better, and they are more likely to get worse, eventually.Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night reduces inflammation and improves overall health, improving oral health and reducing gum disease
  10. Get enough sleep! As crazy as that sounds, sleeping is just as important as brushing! Studies have linked lack of sleep to increased risk of periodontal disease.  Conversely the same studies concluded that increasing sleep to a healthy amount of sleep drastically improved cases of existing periodontal disease. Sleep 7 to 8 hours every night, after you brush and floss your teeth.

We all want to have a great smile and healthy teeth. Good oral hygiene leads to good oral health, but there is more to strong teeth and a lasting smile. Addressing all the things that affect your oral health will help you avoid future problems like gum disease, bad breath, infection, bone loss, tooth loss, even whole health issues like heart disease, strokes and more are tied to good oral health.

Call us today and let us help you improve your health.

Dental Restorations: Bridges -vs- Implants

Dental Restorations: Bridges -vs- Implants

Conventional bridges -vs- dental implants

Why dental implants are better than conventional bridges

Patients are increasingly opting for dental implants over conventional prostheses such as dentures or permanent bridges. Implants offer a number of reasons, both physically and aesthetically, they are superior to older restoration options. Since implants sit securely in the jaw bone, and not glued to adjoining teeth, they offer superior durability and look completely natural at the same time.

Three major categories of restorations still compete with implant option for tooth replacement:

Bonded dental bridge

Bonded dental bridges use the teeth adjacent to the empty space to help support the missing tooth by using a very thin piece of metal or tooth-colored material to overlay and bond to the back of the adjacent teeth. A tooth replacement is set between these two bonded pieces in order to fill in the empty space. Failure rate is about 25 percent after just five years of use.

Cantilevered dental bridge

A cantilevered restoration uses the closest tooth next to the empty space to support the missing tooth using the either the back of the neighboring tooth or a full crown to help support the missing tooth. Success rate is higher than with a bonded bridge depending on how much pressure the actual replacement endures due to grinding and normal wear.

Conventional dental bridge

This type of restoration uses crowns on the teeth next to the empty space that are hooked together to help support the missing tooth. Unfortunately conventional dental bridges predictably fail at a range from 20 percent over 3 years to 3 percent over 23 years.

Compare to the (ceramic) Dental implant

A dental implant is created from a high performance material (zirconium oxide) that is inserted into the bone to act like a natural tooth-root. Due to its nonmetallic construction the ceramic dental implant does not interfere with the body’s immune or meridian systems and therefore does not create a potential for rejection. Once anchored into the jaw, the implant integrates directly into the bone to give firm support to the artificial replacement that it is built to hold and should last the lifetime of a patient.

Routine maintenance of a dental implant is exactly the same as a person would follow for normal teeth.

Healthy patients prefer implants

Patients who prefer dental implants say that they are more comfortable and provide a more secure fit than fixed bridges or removable dentures. Dentures tend to make a person feel and look older. They can cause embarrassment in social situations when they slip and click, and hamper the everyday pleasure of eating comfortably.

Reasons to consider a ceramic dental implant:

• preserves healthy natural surrounding teeth

• looks and feels like natural teeth

• enhances a sense of self-confidence when eating, talking and smiling

• no gooey denture adhesives to deal with

• no embarrassingly loose dentures

• improves quality of speech

• perfectly natural comfort and fit

Anyone who is missing one or more of their teeth may be a candidate for implants. If more than a few of the teeth are missing, implants in supporting a crown or bridge can replace those teeth and function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, then implants may be placed to fix in place a full-mouth fixture.

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

Root Canal: Toxic Time Capsule

Root Canal: Toxic Time Capsule

Poisonous time capsule: Root Canal

Poison and toxins in our environment can come from unexpected places

Root Canals use a variety of dangerous chemicals to clean the inside of the tooth

That’s one way to describe a root canal. Mini time capsules in the body, full of poison. Toxins, trapped inside the body, with the potential to spread inside your body, then attack your immune system, potentially triggering an immune response. That outcome can wreak havoc on organs and tissues. Ultimately this compromises an otherwise healthy body.

Ask anyone, most people are opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside their body.

A morgue in your mouth

Dead, and dying tissue, and bacterial colonies sealed inside a mini coffin. A root canal does exactly that. When a patient gets a root canal, it then creates a mini coffin of chemicals and necrotic tissue. Root canal procedures originally were designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been died, or is dying. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) further complications can then arise. Those complications may be an abscessed tooth or further decay tooth may abscess, continue to decay. Additionally the tooth may fall out, leading to even more problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the canal in the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and kill any remaining, living tissue. As a result, embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarantee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is 100% not possible. Consequently in every case bits of necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue gets left behind. 100% of the time. Bacterial colonies and infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones. This will ultimately weakening and damaging local tissue. Those same toxins and bacteria can lead to a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues become compounded and new issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to address dead, dying or abscessed teeth.

Do You Have a Root Canal?

If you have already had a root canal? Have you had a root canal recommended? Come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy yet attractive alternatives.  Choices that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.