Health First Dental Restoration

Health First Dental Restoration

Put Your Smile First and Your Health First Dental Restorations

Do you need to replace a missing or damaged tooth? Good luck sorting through options on the market today and finding a “viable” one. And by viable, I mean finding one that looks great, works properly, will last a long time, and won’t damage your overall health. This is your teeth we’re talking about – your teeth that allow you to chew, properly consume the nutrients you need through food. There simply just aren’t a lot of great options available, even in today’s technologically advanced age.

That’s why it’s easy to see why so many patients are choosing ceramic dental implants. They are aesthetically superior to all of the other options on the market, looking nearly identical to the natural tooth. Furthermore, ceramic implants can last a lifetime, requiring no maintenance other than the routine care you give your own natural teeth.

Whether the implant can be seen in your smile or not may affect a patient’s choice of replacement options. It is imperative to know all the facts in order to make an informed decision. By examining optimal conditions inside the mouth and understanding the properties that make ceramic a superior choice to support health and reduce potential issues in the future the decision is simplified. Clients who get all-ceramic implants, also known as zirconia or zirconium oxide, are also choosing the best option for overall health, not just their oral health.

Good oral health relies on the healthy bone structure of the jaws, well seated and strong teeth with gum tissue that is actively attached to the tooth. To support these optimum conditions, teeth need to be free from plaque, disease, bacteria, and rot. Ceramic, unlike other materials, is biologically resistant to bacteria, plaque, and the formation of tartar. It has fewer places to harbor pockets of billions of bacteria and typically is so much more precise of a fit that food particles and other odor and bacteria-causing pathogens have nowhere to get lodged, therefore supporting the strength of the remaining natural teeth.

A healthy tooth seated in a healthy jaw stimulates the bone tissue around it, increasing blood flow and maintaining bone mass. When a tooth is damaged by decay or injury and has lost that corresponding area in the bone, tissue can start to diminish.  All-ceramic implants are inserted directly into the bone, just as the natural tooth would be, helping to maintain a healthy and viable bone density and protecting the health of other nearby natural teeth. Conversely, when a bridge is used to replace missing teeth nothing is implanted into the jawbone. Generally the teeth nearby are made smaller to accommodate the bridge, subsequently weakening the previously healthy teeth and making them prone to fractures and breakage. Also, as the bone tissue recedes, the gap around the bridge tends to widen, ultimately crippling the adjacent teeth and causing them to become loose and eventually fall out.

Another important factor to consider when choosing a permanent dental implant is that the material in a ceramic implant is bio-inert. It is non-reactive, non-corrosive, does not conduct heat, cold, or electricity, and will not interact with electromagnetic fields from various electronic devices.

Lastly, ceramic will not corrode, leaching toxins or chemicals into your body. Ceramic has been used and studied in the human body for decades; it has applications in everything from orthopedic implants in the hip and knees to bone screws and vertebral repair, with supporting evidence to its overall safety inside the body.

If you’re looking for a healthy, viable tooth replacement option, please call us today for comprehensive care

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants: More Natural Than Ever

Permanent Dental Implants that actually look great

Ceramic Implants are the best choice, hands-down, when it comes to looking just like your own, natural, teeth. As a patient, you have a choice when it comes to replacing a tooth–from prostheses and bridges to permanent dental implants, options abound.  For most patients and doctors, implants top the list. Why? In addition to their functional benefits, implants are also practical, durable, and much more pleasing aesthetically.

At our office with Dr Marilyn K Jones DDS, we prefer ceramic implants. Their use is outpacing other options for tooth replacement at an exponential rate.

Ceramic Implants are Strong

The material in theses permanent dental implants is zirconia, a ceramic that is extruded from Zirconium, is biologically inert in the human body and has a high tensile strength (meaning it is very strong). But what makes the difference for many patients is the aesthetics: zirconia implants are considered the most realistic looking tooth replacement option available on the market. And let’s face it: we all want our teeth to look good.

Straightforward Implementation

Since ceramic permanent dental implants can so closely match the look and feel of natural teeth, they immediately lend a sense of confidence to the patient. There is no denture to mess with, no embarrassing creams or gels, and no speech issues associated with tooth loss and tooth replacement that are often associated with dentures or other prostheses. There are no restrictions on diet and eating habits, no risk of losing the implant or damaging it while eating. The recipient of a ceramic dental implant also reduces the chance of bone loss in the jaw resulting in the potential of additional dental issues and a diminished jaw-line.

No Negative Side Effects

While the option to use metal implant post, made from titanium, stainless steel or other alloys, for permanent implants can still be performed, this option has aesthetic drawbacks.  Metal posts were the traditional material used in implants for decades, but they leave a silver-grey color along the gumline, making it obvious that your tooth has been replaced.  White implants made from zirconia don’t have that issue: not only are they the same color as your teeth, they actually promote soft tissue growth, meaning that the chance of receding gums are reduced, as well. With metal implants, the gums can’t grow properly, leading to a distinguishable line at base of the new tooth. Even if you experience slight gum loss with ceramic implants, there is no dark metallic line visible at the gum line.

Zirconia, ceramic implants are virtually indistinguishable from real teeth, they do not absorb stains from food or discolor over time. Ceramic implants can last a lifetime and retain their shape and color for the duration. They can be used for one or a few missing teeth or to anchor other prostheses when appropriate.  They are bioinert and will not absorb odor, resist plaque, and are as easy to maintain as real teeth.

Ceramic Implants Last a Lifetime

Implants are permanent: make sure you find a skilled, experienced doctor to place one.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

 

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Options

Ceramic Tooth Implants Are Outpacing Traditional Titanium Restorations.

Today the average adult, in America, will face the permanent loss of 3 or more adult teeth in their lifetime. That statistic has been cut in half over the last few decades and modern dentistry has been a big catalyst for the improvement.  When an adult tooth is extracted due to injury or decay, the best scenario sees that tooth replaced with a permanent implant, traditionally that has been done with titanium posts.

Restoration services can be performed with a variety of materials. The most common, older versions, were constructed from titanium with a ceramic or other composite ‘cap’ covering the anchor as the replacement “tooth”. With the advent of new materials and new technology titanium and metal implants are gradually becoming old school, being replaced by full ceramic options.

Why Change To Ceramics?

Titanium’s track record shows a long history of strong, resilient wear. Titanium was initially believed to be the perfect material to provide safe, long lasting and strong anchors for tooth restoration. Now, after decades of use, medical information and scientific evidence have uncovered a truth that was unforeseen: Titanium can be toxic when left in the body, it is not inert, corrodes over time, and is not the very effective at promoting tissue regrowth.

Though not all individuals are sensitive to titanium, or metals found in other types of metal implants, the consequences for those who are sensitive can be devastating, potentially life threatening. While the worst reactions remain relatively uncommon, lesser reactions and sensitivities are more common and still of concern.

Ceramics Enter the Dental Community After Years of Use Medically

Enter the full ceramic implant. Ceramic tooth restorations are naturally the whitest and brightest. You will never experience discoloring or the drawback of gum tissues around the base of the ceramic tooth restoration, they are easily the vanity choice. Being the best, most realistic option is nice, but it’s not why they are the new gold standard for dentists everywhere.

For decades the medical community have successfully used ceramics in other parts of the body: Hips, knees, and spine to name a few. The long success of ceramics in surgical implants spelled good news to the dental community. At last an option with more than thirty years of documented success.

Ceramics are bio-inert, making them naturally biocompatible.  Ceramic will not corrode, conduct heat or cold, never discolors, and has virtually the same strength as titanium, the old standard. This benefit has been one of the primary factors in dentists preference in ceramics. The biocompatibility equates to long term success and overall improved bone stability and retention in the jaw. Plus a much better retention, or regeneration of soft tissue or gum tissue to support the nearby surrounding healthy teeth.

Ceramic Restorations Raise the Bar

Ceramic restorations are the most compatible with the body’s immune system. They support healthy bone regrowth in areas damaged from trauma or decay, more so than any other option.  Restorations from ceramics consistently demonstrate improved bone regrowth, even gingival attachment and regrowth.  Since ceramics are so good at promoting hard and soft tissue regrowth it’s of little surprise that they are resistant to corrosion at a much higher standard than their metal counterparts. Ceramics do not absorb into tissues or into the bloodstream and won’t corrode over time. That fact further boosts the desirability of ceramics as a restoration option.

These facts have elevated ceramic tooth restorations to a prime choice for dental practices who put their patients long term health and well being as their number one priority.

If you have questions, would like a consult or are ready to schedule your appointment please contact us.

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison, Metals in Dentistry

Slow Poison

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

The effects of longterm exposure to metal can begin to poison us over time.

Metals in dental restorations have a potential link to overall health inadequacies. Metals compromise immune systems in sensitive individuals.

Multiple studies correlate metal sensitivities to a battery of autoimmune diseases and several processes that critical in running the bodies delicately balanced endocrine system. Ultimately the thyroid, pancreas, and other critical hormone systems are typically most affected.

All metals (titanium, nickel, steel, silver and other alloys)used in dental procedures, weather for implants or abutments, fillings or dentures, will eventually begin to corrode. As time passes corroding metal particles become ions binding to proteins inside the body’s individual cells. Due to blood vessels creating a perfect transportation system, metal particles can readily travel throughout the body. For some individuals these “foreign invaders” set off a chain reaction within the immune system. As the immune system goes on high alert and begins attacking various parts of the body numerous symptoms arise. Consequently various internal systems may begin to fail.

Symptoms to metal implants vary from patient to patient. Often including an oral burning sensation, general fatigue, skin rashes, a constant dull pain and in some cases, loss of the implant. A paper published in July of 2011 focused on titanium allergy in patients who have undergone an implant, it concluded in part; “This review of the literature indicates that titanium can induce hypersensitivity in susceptible patients and could play a critical role in implant failure.”

Who Cares

What impact, if any, will metals have on you? No one can say for certain. Even petients with existing metal components in their mouth risk that there will be a tipping point. When the level of adsorbed metal becomes more than the immune system will tolerate. Most noteworthy, time plays a factor. As time passes more and more ions can be absorbed so that the effects of metal toxins might not be evident for years.

Great New Options

z-systems zirconia dental implants

ceramics used in dental implants are non-metallic and white throughout

With Zirconium, or all ceramic implants, there is never a risk of being slowly poisoned. Ceramic dental implants do not corrode. They will not absorb or dissolve in any way, as a result, there’s no need to consider long term replacements as they can last a lifetime with the same regular hygiene your natural teeth need.

Call today for a consult and to learn more about your choices and about implants that are customized to benefit your long term health.

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Overlooked Smile Fixes You Can DIY

Overlooked Smile Fixes You Can DIY

Often overlooked DIY smile fixes

With so many good options for keeping our mouths healthy sometimes it gets hard to keep track of it all. Often with rhetoric about commercial products to improve smiles and white teeth we can lose track of the simple steps we can integrate for free, that often exceed any of the other good choices for providing long term strength and health to a beautiful smile.

1.) Brushing

I guess we can start with the most obvious. Often we feel like we are doing an adequate job with our brushing but it’s my experience that most people will cut short their standard “two minute” brush times, everyday or almost everyday. If you are an ardent follower of this rule then pat yourself on the back. The next most common brushing failure is cutting out one of your normal brushes (recommended twice daily) Patients who will admit this say it happens rarely once or twice a month.

Get the most out of your brushing. Don’t cut short your brush times, don’t skip it on a late night,  don’t’ skip replacing your toothbrush at regular intervals, all of these abuses take a toll on our mouths over time. Finally a reminder that you can skip all the fancy, fangled toothpaste with sparkles, added colors, gimmicks and chemicals to help you think it works better, try an easy, really good homemade brush paste to get your whitest smile without chemicals.

2.) Flossing

Again another obvious step to a healthy mouth. While flossing might seem unsurprising and should be a routine part of our daily hygiene, it is largely ignored or skipped by patients. Note that flossing can remove as much plaque, food particles and biofilm from teeth as brushing AFTER you’ve finished brushing.

When done properly flossing involves wrapping the floss around three sides of the tooth being flossed and using a “sawing” motion up and down the surface of the tooth all the way into the gum line. Flossing can play a big factor in stopping gum recession and periodontal disease. Floss your teeth, all of them, at least one time daily.

3.) Drink More Water.

Having adequate hydration and sufficient saliva help create a barrier for to protect teeth and gums.

DIY smile enhancers require adequate hydration and sufficient saliva help create a barrier for to protect teeth and gums.

Maybe this grabbed you by surprise.  Water is perhaps our greatest asset in our whole body’s defense against disease and this analogy holds true even more so inside our mouths. Adequate amounts of saliva are your mouth’s best defense against the food particles feeding bacteria and against the bacteria themselves. The best way to make sure you have enough fresh, slippery, slimy, beneficial saliva?  Take your body weight and divide it by two, this give you the recommended number of ounces you need to drink of water, daily to stay adequately hydrated, more if you sweat, its really hot outside or you drink caffeine. Go and get a glass of water to drink while you finish the rest of this article. I’ll wait.

4.) Cut Down on Alcohol, Quit using Nicotine.

Smoking has an immediate and lasting effect on the bodies circulatory system. Changes in blood pressure and heart rate can affect your overall health but in your mouth these processes comprise the tissues and the blood flow to vital nerves and tissues. The tar and smoke and nicotine interrupt the natural process that saliva plays in keeping your gums and teeth healthy.  Pair this with the increased temperature from the inhalation of smoke (if you are smoking vs other nicotine forms) and it is the perfect storm to impede the natural ability of the mouth to heal itself.

Drinking alcohol also introduces harmful chemicals to the body. Alcohol, like smoking dries the oral tissues and impairs the natural process of the saliva that is there to protect the teeth. The acidic nature of alcohol invariably weakens and erodes away the protective enamel on the outside of the teeth, thus teeth become even more susceptible to decay. Decay leads to gum disease and bone loss.

Limit alcohol consumption and stop smoking. Long term these are two of the most measurable things you can do for your body’s overall health AND your mouth’s health.

5.) Sleep! 

Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night reduces inflammation and improves overall health, improving oral health and reducing gum disease

DIY simple smile fixes require plenty of sleep for long term maintenance

In a four year study of over two hundred patients the largest factor contributing to gum/periodontal disease after smoking was lack of sleep. Those patients receiving six or less hours of sleep had a more rapid progression of disease and inflammation.  Surprisingly when subjects increased their average hours of sleep up to seven or eight hours of sleep their gum disease decreased or slowed measurably.

Call our office now at (713) 785-7767 to schedule your next appointment. We look forward to meeting you and earning your trust.

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Sleeping Your Way to a Beautiful Smile

Can you sleep your way to a better smile? 

Grandma called it beauty sleep and you shrugged, even rolled your eyes but recent research shows that adequate sleep can hold off and slow down the effects of stress, age and all kinds of wear and tear on the body, even help with weight loss, but did you know it is also one of the greatest factors to having and keeping a beautiful smile? Getting a good night’s rest can do a lot more than preserve your good looks.

Studies can link a relationship of good sleeping habits to better heart health, lower blood pressure, and decreased incidence of diabetes, now add to that list improved gum and mouth health.  To thousands who suffer from periodontal disease, at any stage, that signals good news.

The Link Between Sleep and Oral Health 

Reduce inflammation with adequate sleep to improve oral health and get a beautiful smile.

Reduce inflammation with sleep to improve oral health

The less sleep you get per night relates to the onset of periodontitis–a disease in which deep pockets form between the teeth and gums, leading to loose and shifting teeth, and the destruction of the bone and connective tissue which hold teeth in place.

A study at the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine examined over 200 factory workers to assess whether various lifestyle factors (i.e. exercise, diet, stress) had an effect on periodontitis. Throughout the four year-study, researchers used periodontal probes to monitor any changes in the pockets between teeth and gums.

According to the findings, workers who slept seven to eight hours per night were had a lower risk for periodontitis than those who slept less than six hours per night.  In fact, sleep deprivation was the second most influential factor associated with the onset of periodontitis, right behind smoking.

Lack of Sleep and Inflammation

The root of this association is most likely inflammation. Sleep deprivation is a known cause of increased inflammation, which in turn is a risk factor for other serious diseases like heart disease and stroke.

Research at the Emory University School of Medicine found that, when you are sleep deprived, there is an increased production of inflammatory hormones.  One such inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein, was 25% higher in subjects who had less than six hours of sleep per night.

In addition to being a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, inflammation is also a sign of gingivitis, the mild form of gum disease that can lead to periodontitis.

Get A Good Night’s Sleep

It’s not how long, but how well you sleep that counts too.  Even if you get a full eight hours each night, you don’t get the same health benefits if you wake up often.

A few tips for those that have trouble getting a good night’s rest:

Routine: Your body clock wants to adjust to your needs, but it cannot adjust if those needs are always changing. Establishing a routine alerts the body that this is the time you need to go to sleep.

Wind-down without your electronics: Giving yourself time to wind-down before you sleep helps your mind relax. There are many different ways to wind-down, whether it’s reading, yoga, or sipping a cup of hot tea. Just be sure not to use electronics. The latest research shows that artificial light from laptops, TV’s, and iPhones suppress the hormone which regulates sleep, melatonin.

Get up instead of tossing and turning: You want to keep your bedroom associated with sleep rather than being awake. So if you are tossing and turning, get up and do a relaxing activity until you feel tired again. Then try and go back to sleep.

To offset some of the inevitable lack of sleep when things get way too busy and remember to:

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Trouble; Toxins and Root Canals

What root canals are really leaving behind. Toxins, trapped inside the body, swirling around inside your body, attacking your immune system and potentially triggering an immune response or inflammation. Ultimately wreaking havoc on organs and tissues, compromising an otherwise healthy body. These are the facts of getting a root canal.

Ask anyone, most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body.

A morgue in your mouth

Trapping dead, and dying tissues and bacterial colonies locked inside the body is exactly what happens when a patient gets a root canal, a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive, or viable. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised and the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth may abscess, continue to decay–potentially affecting surrounding teeth or it may fall out, leading to additional problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and to kill any remaining, viable or nonviable tissue. This equates to essentially embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarentee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case there is always necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas, but those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues can become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

Oil Pulling Still Worth a Try

Oil Pulling Still Worth a Try

Oil Pulling, the old new thing in home dental care

Once a long lost practice, now rediscovered, oil pulling may be one more strategy you may want to put into the regime.

A simple practice known as ‘oil pulling’ may be one of the very best ways to prevent or treat mouth and gum disease. It has been a popular and practical exercise of Ayurvedic medicine for ages and was more recently introduced to Western cultures by a Dr. F. Karach, M.D. in the early 90s. Dr. Karach advocated oil pulling due to the results he detailed in the treatment of a variety of of illnesses including everything from migraine headaches and bronchitis, to gum disease, leukemia and heart disease – just to name a few.

A 2009 study conducted by researchers Asokan, Emmadi, Chamundeswari seemed to back up earlier claims and highlight the effectiveness of oil pulling on the treatment of gum disease. The trial involved swishing sesame oil to test it against plaque-induced gingivitis in 20 test subjects, and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine mouthwash. Results concluded that there was a significant reduction in “… the plaque index, modified gingival scores and total colony count of aerobic microorganisms in the plaque of adolescents with plaque-induced gingivitis.”

How oil pulling works

Longtime practitioners of oil pulling recommend using sesame, safflower, sunflower or vegetable oil but recently the anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal properties of coconut oil has made it the preferred go-to oil to use. Practicing oil pulling is a simple process that starts with swishing a tablespoon of your preferred oil back, forth and around the mouth and teeth for anywhere from 15 to 20 minutes –followed by a thorough rinse and routine brushing. By adopting this practice into your oral care routine – and doing it first thing in the morning, you may begin to reap some of the benefits including:

• Healthier gums
• Whiter teeth
• A significant reduction of plaque and tartar
• Fresher breath

Killing bacteria with oil pulling

At any given moment, the human mouth contains an assortment of active microbes, with bacteria being the most prolific. Experts estimate that more than 100 million microbes thrive in every milliliter of saliva – containing upwards of 600 different species of bacteria — some beneficial, others harmful. Without following a regime of proper oral hygiene, the nastier bacteria will eventually collect and form a sticky film on teeth and tongue. Left untreated plaque and other bacteria can flow into the digestive tract and potentially cause, or aggravate, a wide variety of chronic health issues.

The enzymes naturally found in food grade oils are thought to help pull toxins, pus and mucus away from not only teeth, gums and tongue, but also from the body’s cells, blood and digestive tract. Ayurveda suggests that oil pulling works by purifying, cleansing and detoxifying the entire system by removing harmful toxins. In Ayurveda each section of the human tongue is connected to corresponding vital organs of the body such as lungs, kidneys, stomach, colon, liver, spine, heart and small intestines. By keeping the teeth and tongue free of toxic buildup through the practice of oil pulling, you’re actually helping to keep the whole body healthy.

Conclusion

Proper dental hygiene is not only important for oral health, it is essential to all aspects of wellness. Adding oil pulling to already established oral care techniques including brushing and flossing and avoiding sugars and processed foods, makes it even more possible to maintain a healthier mouth and body.

More Information:

http://www.jaim.in/article.asp?issn=0975-9476;year=2011;volume=2;issue=2;spage=64;epage=68;aulast=Singh#ref19

http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/article%20oil%20pulling.htm
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/08/coconut-oil-combats-tooth-decay.aspx
http://www.oilpulling.com/
http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/oil_pulling.html
http://hubpages.com/hub/Health_Benefits_of_Oil_Pulling_
http://www.homemadebodycleanse.com/cleanse-recipes/sunflower-oil-pull.htm
http://www.jonbarron.org/article/oil-pulling-detoxing

And — How Coconut Oil Can Be Used As A Mouthwash (VIDEO)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/02/coconut-oil-mouthwash-video_n_2375038.html

Resources: Asokan S, Emmadi P, Chamundeswari R. – Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Indian J Dent Res 2009;20:47-51.

The Tipping Point: Integrated Medicine

The Tipping Point: Integrated Medicine

If you don’t have what it takes to be the healthiest version of you, your dentist might, especially if they practice integrated medicine

It’s long been suspected by both primary care doctors and dentist that oral health held a link to the rest of the body’s wellness.  Today, science and research is bearing that out as more than antidotal. What starts in the mouth can benefit, or harm, the whole body. Integrated medicine practices incorporating the body’s whole health.

Now more than ever research demonstrates that our mental and physical health are linked to each other in more ways than we know. Poor oral health has been linked to heart disease, auto immune disease and diabetes to name just a few, while those same diseases have also been linked to chronic malaise, even depression and depression and malaise have been linked to obesity and high blood pressure.

The answers may be interrelated and, as it turns out one answer may be to keep your whole body healthy by starting with your mouth.

Emerging science tells us that many things influence our whole body health. More recently science has confirmed that even the health of our teeth and gums affect our overall health. Heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune disease, and many other disorders can all be affected by the health and wellness of teeth and gums. For decades practitioners believed a link exists between the two and now research bears this out.

The road to getting and staying healthy is often a lifelong commitment continually making and setting goals, re-evaluating ability and circumstance, then course correcting as needed. In the span of a lifetime the work is ongoing. As we build healthy habits and healthy bodies, and as we remember to be vigilant in the ways we preserve our healthy teeth and maintain optimal health be mindful of the many ways to optimize our best level of whole health.

Integrative Medicine and Whole Body Wellness.

Integrated Medicine is not a new practice but more of a merging of traditional Western Medicine and more nontraditional methods of medicine such as acupuncture.

Here at Marilyn K. Jones we strive to stay informed, we will work with you and your health care professionals to create a tailored health care program for you and your specific needs.

 

Restorations can Prevent Future Pain

Restorations can Prevent Future Pain

Choosing the right restorations can prevent pain in the future

Unexpected circumstances can turn an almost perfect smile into a painful one. Time changes things, even a perfect smile. If you are experiencing oral pain, need a future tooth replacement or restoration, or have had a restoration you are not happy with, consider the following;

A medical link exists for potential increased frequency in headaches, migraine headaches and even TMJ (temporomandibular joint disorders) related to tooth loss without proper restoration. Even small changes in bite and tooth placement have been identified as having the capacity to be problematic.

 

When a tooth is lost…
due to trauma, decay or periodontal disease the surrounding bone material immediately becomes compromised.  Additionally the missing tooth no longer helps distribute pressure during chewing and biting, thereby increasing the amount of pressure and bite force placed on the remaining teeth. The additional pressure on the remaining teeth can be responsible for fractures to those teeth, excessive wear, and all too often the remaining teeth drift or shift to new positions in the jaw and in so doing, change the overall bite.

Changes in bite…
and tooth placement due to shifting can typically affect the aesthetics of a smile, what you may not know is that it can also compromise the health of the remaining teeth. First by creating changes in how straight teeth are potentially diminishing your ability to clean properly, secondly drifting teeth might not be properly aligned and bite force from normal chewing may potentially chip or crack teeth.

Bridges
Common practice traditionally replaced a single missing tooth with a fixed bridge. Unfortunately a bridge does not address any of the negative effects of a missing tooth. Soft tissues still retreat, bone mass in the jaw is still absorbed, the surrounding teeth are compromised by the process of preparing them for the bridge. With the lack of adequate bone and soft tissues the remaining teeth, often, are susceptible to drifting. Decay and rot also threatened the neighboring teeth once they’ve been drilled and filed for the bridge.

Implants
For decades dentist have been able to surgically implant permanent teeth to take the place of a tooth lost from trauma, decay or disease. For several decades dentist have been using all ceramic implants. The post that goes into the jaw bone is no longer metal but ceramic. Ceramics have proven over and over to be the ideal long term solution when getting an implant.  Uniquely capable of being integrated and accepted into the biology of the mouth, both promoting soft tissue gum growth and fusing seamlessly with living bone while not disturbing or compromising the surrounding teeth, thusly providing a solution to all potentially negative outcomes of a missing tooth.

Full Ceramic Implants
Ceramic implants are the answer to dentist concerns for the health of their patients and for the patient there is nothing that compares to the aesthetics of an all ceramic implant. Additionally ceramic implants unique properties will never leach into your tissues or body, they will not breakdown or corrode, they do not conduct hot or cold and are, in fact, so precisely fitted that they might fit better and look better than the original teeth, certainly more so than any other restoration option. All while leaving other healthy teeth perfectly in place and unadulterated.

For the best experience and a guarantee in your implant, to ensure a lifetime smile, call our office and make an appointment. Our professional staff is expertly trained. You can trust our extensive experience in implants and restorations to leave you with a beautiful, pain free smile for years to come.