Matters of the Mouth While Pregnant

Matters of the Mouth While Pregnant

Being pregnant creates special circumstances for your oral health

Tooth Care During Pregnancy. Conditions during pregnancy make mouths more vulnerable to disease. A little extra attention goes a long way to maintain a healthy smile. Step-by-step and trimester-by-trimester here are the things that will keep teeth healthy.

First Trimester

It’s still early in the pregnancy but hormones and morning sickness can start making big changes to oral wellness.

  • Check with your insurance provider, you may be allowed extra cleanings and check-ups while pregnant.
  • If you’re suffering from morning sickness stay hydrated. Also, Rinsing the mouth frequently keeps gums healthy.
  • Avoid triggering nausea, use a bland toothpaste and small, soft toothbrush.
  • Contact your dentist, ask if they have any special recommendations during your pregnancy.
  • Check gums regularly for Pregnancy Gingivitis. Look for puffy, inflamed gums. Changes in hormones often cause symptoms in the mouth too.

Second Trimester

Trimester two marks the middle of pregnancy. The end is closer, stay on top of oral care to keep teeth healthy.

  • In the second trimester avoid eating sugary snacks, your gums are the most vulnerable at this point in the pregnancy.
  • DO NOT skip brushing or flossing. Vigilance will pay off with healthy gums and teeth at the end of pregnancy.
  • Take vitamins and supplements as instructed by your doctor. Make sure your diet includes lots of Vitamin C, Calcium and Vitamin B12.
  • By the second trimester some patients develop small, temporary tumors on the gums, called Pregnancy  Granuloma. They can be found in the mouth, on gums or even on lips.

Third Trimester

The home stretch is the last 6 to 12 weeks of pregnancy. Take special care to not let all of your hard work be wasted.

  • You may be tired, fatigue can be chronic in pregnancy. DO NOT skip brushing or flossing. Vigilance will pay off with healthy gums and teeth at the end of pregnancy.
  • At this stage, hold off on any dental procedures you need. Consult your doctor but in most cases this is the best option for mother and baby.
  • Schedule a cleaning appointment for after the baby is born.

Post Partum

Many mothers choose to nurse their newborns. Nursing has a few provisions to keep teeth tip-top too.

  • Eat lots of mineral dense foods like nuts, cheese, dark green leafy foods as they help make up. for calcium and other nutrients needed for breast milk. Ensure that your body has enough to go around.
    • Use vitamins to supplement as recommended by your doctor.
    • Teeth need strong dentine to keep from becoming brittle and hypersensitive.
  • Proceed with any dental work, X-rays, local anesthesia and nitrous oxide are all considered safe while breastfeeding.
  • Consult your dentist about removing silver fillings or any other dental work that may potentially contaminate your breastmilk.

Mother Hood is wonderful, its also a lot of work. Make life easier for yourself by maintaining healthy teeth.

 

 

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

The Cold and Flu Tax on Teeth

Cold and flu tax your oral health too

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  1. Dry Mouth:
    • Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity.
    • The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes.
    • Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier.
      • Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth,
      • And bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  2. Cough Drops and Medications:
    • Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet.
    • Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
      To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them. Stay adequately hydrated.
  3. Fatigue:
    • Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus.
    • Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices.
    • Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis.
    • Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

Single Day Tooth Replacement: Fact Sheet

Single Day Tooth Replacement: Fact Sheet

Ceramic Implants Done For Best Potential Outcome:
Multi-visit placement vs single day implant

You need a dental restoration. Some dental practices advertise single day restorations. Instant dental implants and no required follow ups for additional treatments.

Ceramic implants, far and away, are the best looking, strongest, healthiest, and most natural option for tooth replacement.

  • Any concerns about longevity or durability have been put to rest since ceramic options can last as long as natural, healthy, teeth.
  • Add to that how much ceramic implants actually increase the viability and vitality of your whole mouth in comparison to other replacement options and the choice was made for you.

You may be considering your options for the restorative procedure itself. There are dentists who offer  single day implants. A one day visit to fix everything. Most dentists however, prefer several visits to complete the implant, restoration processes.

You might wonder if it matters

The promise of instant gratification and less planning or scheduling is tempting.

  • You are considering if it really makes a difference in the outcome.
  • It’s comforting to hope that such a big procedure could be over and done in a single day.
  • That may be part of the reason single day visits are offered.
    • We are programmed to go looking for the easy button, instant gratification.

Word of warning

The science and research indicates one major factor contributting to implant failure is not allowing time for bone and soft tissues to heal before completing the procedure.

Do your mouth a favor and give it the proper time to heal.

A ceramic implant is anchored in the jaw bone. Depending on several factors, including the number of teeth to be restored and the quality and quantity of bone material, you may be able to start with the initial procedure being the anchor itself.

In some instances there may be recommended procedures to do prior to implanting the anchor in order to ensure proper bone mass and health. Afterwards the anchor is given adequate time for the bone around it to heal and be strongly attached. There may be a follow up exam to confirm this. The next step is placing a new, ceramic, fixed, permanent tooth.

Invest in Your Health

Most implant procedures are very predictable and your skilled dentist can make the entire procedure nearly effortless. It’s worth the wait to know you’ve got the most advanced, successful system. You are investing time to ensure the best outcome, giving yourself the best odds of a restoration that will last your entire life and look great doing it. Lets face it, this was no small decision and you should know, you’ve done your research. When you come in to see us we will be happy to work with you to find the best time and availability to fit your schedule.

The entire implant process requires very specialized, advanced equipment and training.

  • We have the training,
  • the expertise
  • and are ready to give you the smile you deserve.

While in our care all aspects of your overall health will be taken into consideration, your comfort, health, convenience, investment and satisfaction matter to us.

Ten Things To Rev Up Your Good Oral Health

Good Oral Health: Ten Ways To Ensure The Strongest Teeth

“The baby boomers will be the first U.S. generation to age while maintaining their natural dentition.”

So often the health of our teeth is taken for granted. Advances in dentistry, prevention, and health care have greatly improved good oral health of millions of Americans to a point where an entire generation of baby boomers are about to set a new bench mark. More of us are keeping our natural teeth or the majority of our natural teeth through our entire life.

As Medical studies have born-out, good oral health is directly linked to good overall health. It stands to reason that our general health benefits from paying close attention to, and taking adequate care of our teeth.

Your Count Down To Stronger, Healthier Teeth and Tip-Top Oral Health

  1. Brush daily. Brushing your teeth, tongue and the roof of your mouth is paramount. For the best brushing spend 2 to 3 minutes on the entire mouth. Use a tooth brush that is less than 3 months old. Older toothbrushes have straight, un-freyed, and are clean from debris. Always try to brush two times a day and rinse mouth after meals and in between brushing.
  2. Flossing daily. Flossing has been hotly contested recently but dentist still maintain that, done properly, it is one of the most effective ways to clean between teeth and at the gum-line.  Floss should be about 12-15 inches long and a new section of floss should be used as you proceed to the next tooth. Floss should remain taught and attention to an even, gentle sawing motion down from the top to gum-line. It’s important to not “saw” or slam into the gum and soft tissues but to purposefully clean between the teeth.
  3. Clean your tongue every morning.There are various tools that can be used to “tongue scrape” or wipe off the excess film that collects in the crevices of the back of the tongue.
  4. Look at the overall picture. Teeth need to be straight. Crowed teeth provide more hiding places for bacterial colonies that lead to bad breath and plaque build up.
  5. Stop using tobacco. Smoking and oral tobacco both significantly contribute to staining. Worst of all they cause oral cancer and other maladies that contribute to periodontal disease and tooth loss.
  6. Drink more. Water that is. Drinking water flushes the mouth, helps keep it clean and you hydrated. Being hydrated ensures good saliva production, in-turn protecting teeth.  That means drinking less coffee, soda, juices and alcohol. Coffee and soda have sulfurs and contain may also contain sugars both of which contribute to weaker teeth, cavities and staining.
  7. Eat a variety of colorful and nutrient dense foods. Certain foods actually help remineralize teeth. calcium dense foods, nuts, cheeses, leafy greens, crunchy fruits and vegetables all contribute to stronger enamel, stronger gums, and better oral health.
  8. Don’t’ skip the dentist. Every visit that the dentist finds that everything in your mouth is healthy potentially pushes off a visit that could have been a problem visit.  Regular check-ups and cleanings are the key to cheaper visits and healthier teeth.
  9. If you see something or feel something, say something. The minute something feels wrong inside your mouth, call your dentist. Chances are that things won’t get better, and they are more likely to get worse, eventually.Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night reduces inflammation and improves overall health, improving oral health and reducing gum disease
  10. Get enough sleep! As crazy as that sounds, sleeping is just as important as brushing! Studies have linked lack of sleep to increased risk of periodontal disease.  Conversely the same studies concluded that increasing sleep to a healthy amount of sleep drastically improved cases of existing periodontal disease. Sleep 7 to 8 hours every night, after you brush and floss your teeth.

We all want to have a great smile and healthy teeth. Good oral hygiene leads to good oral health, but there is more to strong teeth and a lasting smile. Addressing all the things that affect your oral health will help you avoid future problems like gum disease, bad breath, infection, bone loss, tooth loss, even whole health issues like heart disease, strokes and more are tied to good oral health.

Call us today and let us help you improve your health.

Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and Flu Season Impact On Oral Health

Cold and flu viruses affect your oral health

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  • Dry Mouth: Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity. The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes. Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier. Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
    • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages also dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth, and bad breath.
    • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  • Cough Drops and Medications: Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet. Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
    • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
    • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.
    • To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them.  Stay adequately hydrated.
  • Fatigue: Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all common symptoms when battling a cold or flu virus. Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices. Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
    • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis. Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease, for example.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

 

The Fluoride Debate

The Fluoride Debate:  To Use Fluoride Or Not To Use Fluoride

Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

The Debate: Beautiful and healthy smiles may not be dependant on fluoride use.

You can find a professional opinion at every turn regarding the argument: To Fluoride or Not To Fluoride. The topic “to use fluoride” or “not to use fluoride” should be less confusing.  One simple answer.  A nice and neat, black and white answer is what we need.  Historically, in science, black and white are not something easily come by.  Currently the ongoing argument finds dentist on the defense weather they are pro fluoride or anti-fluoride.

Why The Debate?

Fluoride has been a staple of the American dental regimine and dentist recommendations since the 1950’s. You don’t have to look long, or hard to see why that protocol fell into place. Communities with naturally fluoridated water supplies had drastically lower rates of decay, sometimes as low as 30% lower than non fluoridated communities. Enter fluoride’s stampede into the american household. Fluoride found it’s way into toothpaste, mouthwash, baby vitamins, and municipal water supplies across the country.  Today more than two thirds of americans are currently receiving artificially fluoridated water at their faucet. Additionally some of their foods, toothpaste, many mouthwashes and supplements can contain fluoride.

Naturally occurring fluoride is a mineral called calcium fluoride, found in various places around the world it readily absorbs into ground water in trace amounts.  Communities with naturally occurring calcium fluoride, a mineral found in various regions around the world, have consistently demonstrated lower incidence of tooth decay so the argument seemed sound.  Except that the fluoride added to municipal water supplies all around the country is not naturally occurring calcium fluoride.

Municipal water that is fluoridated today essentially is an chemical waste product. The entire argument for the use of fluoride is based on studies in communities with naturally occurring mineral deposits of calcium fluoride. Recent studies from communities with artificially fluoridated water have not been able to backup or substantiate the original findings of reduced dental decay and cavity incident.

Fluoride is a Toxin

Many Americans are aware that fluoride is a toxin, yet somehow we look past the fact that a tube of toothpaste easily contains enough fluoride to kill a small child. As consumers we’ve educated ourselves about all kinds of toxins that find their way into our bodies, even switching out the containers in our homes to eradicate exposure to BPA’s and other known chemicals with potential to harm.

Fluoride is not an unknown. Science has linked fluoride exposure to cancer, complications with diabetes, dementia, arthritis, mental defects, alzheimer’s, birth defects and a whole myriad of other complications. Still we have not eliminated or reduced our exposure, our children’s exposure or the eventual overload to the environment to the toxins of fluoride.

Since fluoride is nearly impossible to filter out of water the best option to reduce exposure is to get it out of toothpaste and mouthwash products in your home. There are alternatives that are very effective, maybe more so than fluoride, at remineralizing enamel and strengthening teeth. In essence fluoride only effectively works topically, unless teeth are still forming below the gum line, otherwise ingesting fluoride serves no purpose and, in fact, is toxic.

In the long list of everyday things people come into contact with that are toxic, potentially even deadly, fluoride should not be overlooked or separated out from worst offenders. Fluoride hurts people.  In many cases it is forced on us through regimented doses in public water systems.

Alternatives to Fluoride

There are ways to help ensure tooth enamel stays strong and resilient while avoiding fluoride products. Individuals may focus on foods that are especially good at remineralizing teeth, eliminate specific foods that soften and wear out enamel and use products like xylitol that have shown potential in remineralizing and protecting enamel. These are just a few of the options when it comes to eliminating a toxic substance and continuing to protect your teeth and overall health.

Contact our office for products and information about alternatives to fluoride.

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Toxins; Root Canals

Teaming with Trouble; Toxins and Root Canals

What root canals are really leaving behind. Toxins, trapped inside the body, swirling around inside your body, attacking your immune system and potentially triggering an immune response or inflammation. Ultimately wreaking havoc on organs and tissues, compromising an otherwise healthy body. These are the facts of getting a root canal.

Ask anyone, most of us would be opposed to having a necrotic cesspool of decay and disease trapped inside our body.

A morgue in your mouth

Trapping dead, and dying tissues and bacterial colonies locked inside the body is exactly what happens when a patient gets a root canal, a procedure originally designed to save a tooth with too much nerve and tissue damage to remain alive, or viable. In other words due to infection, trauma, or decay the nerve, blood supply and pulp inside the tooth have been compromised and the tooth is dying or no longer alive. Without some kind of intervention (sometimes a root canal) the tooth may abscess, continue to decay–potentially affecting surrounding teeth or it may fall out, leading to additional problems.

Root Canals are performed by removing all of the soft insides of a tooth: the blood vessel that nourishes the tooth, the nerve, and pulp. Harsh chemicals are irrigated into the “canal” made after grinding out the inside of the tooth. Chemicals used to irrigate the new canal into the root of the tooth are intended to sterilize as much of the canal, or hole, as possible and to kill any remaining, viable or nonviable tissue. This equates to essentially embalming what remains of the tooth.

The 100% guarentee

We know after decades of research, and thousands of patients, that removing 100% of the rotting tissue is not possible. In every case there is always necrotic (dead, diseased) tissue left behind, 100% of the time. The bacterial colonies and the infection eventually permeate surrounding tissue and bones, ultimately weakening and damaging local areas, but those same toxins and bacteria can also have a systemic effect on the rest of the body.

As toxins, from a root canal, infiltrate the blood stream and collect in organ tissues chronic health issues can become compounded and new health issues develop. Immune systems that are already under attack or otherwise compromised stand to sustain the most damage. As the medical news around this potential hazard continues to develop, many dentist are adopting new solutions to addressing a dead, dying or abscessed tooth.

If you have already had a root canal, or have had a root canal recommended come see our team and have an expert give you all of your options. Our team can give you healthy attractive alternatives that maintain and support your body’s overall health and immunity.

The Tipping Point: Integrated Medicine

The Tipping Point: Integrated Medicine

If you don’t have what it takes to be the healthiest version of you, your dentist might, especially if they practice integrated medicine

It’s long been suspected by both primary care doctors and dentist that oral health held a link to the rest of the body’s wellness.  Today, science and research is bearing that out as more than antidotal. What starts in the mouth can benefit, or harm, the whole body. Integrated medicine practices incorporating the body’s whole health.

Now more than ever research demonstrates that our mental and physical health are linked to each other in more ways than we know. Poor oral health has been linked to heart disease, auto immune disease and diabetes to name just a few, while those same diseases have also been linked to chronic malaise, even depression and depression and malaise have been linked to obesity and high blood pressure.

The answers may be interrelated and, as it turns out one answer may be to keep your whole body healthy by starting with your mouth.

Emerging science tells us that many things influence our whole body health. More recently science has confirmed that even the health of our teeth and gums affect our overall health. Heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune disease, and many other disorders can all be affected by the health and wellness of teeth and gums. For decades practitioners believed a link exists between the two and now research bears this out.

The road to getting and staying healthy is often a lifelong commitment continually making and setting goals, re-evaluating ability and circumstance, then course correcting as needed. In the span of a lifetime the work is ongoing. As we build healthy habits and healthy bodies, and as we remember to be vigilant in the ways we preserve our healthy teeth and maintain optimal health be mindful of the many ways to optimize our best level of whole health.

Integrative Medicine and Whole Body Wellness.

Integrated Medicine is not a new practice but more of a merging of traditional Western Medicine and more nontraditional methods of medicine such as acupuncture.

Here at Marilyn K. Jones we strive to stay informed, we will work with you and your health care professionals to create a tailored health care program for you and your specific needs.

 

Good Better Best Dentistry

Good Better Best Dentistry

Good — Better — Best

Best dentistry 

Not just your best dentistry choices but virtually all of life has multitudes of good choices. Options abound through the course of any given day. Even when faced with good options there is always “good,” “better,””best” to select from. When we look at options for nutrition, for example, we have healthy options–that are good– and healthy options that are sustainable and organic for our best options. Fitness experts will tell you that consistently getting exercise, even if it’s only 15 vigorous minutes a day, is a good place to start. While optimal best case fitness would be 30 to 60 minutes 3 to 6 times a week depending on your level of fitness.  There are good ways to use recreational time and there are “going the distance” recreational enjoyment. Even sleeping has good, better, best; consistently sleeping 7 hours a night is good, getting 8 hours of sleep is better and getting 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep, at a regular time, following a bedtime routine, or meditation, every single night, is best.

What “Best dentistry” means

Medicine and dentistry follow the rest of life, there are always options for good, better, best. We know, after years of evidence, that it all ties in together ultimately affecting your overall health. Science shows us that diet affects our health, diet affects the health of our mouth too. Sleep and even stress levels affect our oral health, not just our bodies. We know there will be cavities, potential tooth loss, restorations, cleanings, braces, prevention, hygiene choices and that all of those have their own set of good, better, best options.

Best overall

At Marilyn K Jones, we know that your optimal health is intertwined with your oral health. We understand that science is continually finding connections to oral health and other disease processes, like diabetes, heart disease, dementia, autoimmune disease, arthritis, cancer and more. Knowing this we carefully choose the kinds of procedures, the materials and the methods we use to keep your teeth and mouth at their best, weather we are filling a cavity, doing a full restoration on a missing tooth, addressing severe gum disease, or simply selecting hygiene products for your best smile.

Metals and how M. K. Jones Best helps you

Our office has a variety of options to hand pick the dental options that will give you the greatest impact, weather checking for sensitivities to metals, or safely removing old hardware, mercury leaching fillings or infections that can be manifesting or hiding out from previous restorations.

Best to avoid

Because we are a biological practice we are acutely aware that less chemicals and less toxins are important to you, your health and to future generations, we have options and educational material to help you eliminate fluoride and other potential hazards from your life.

Good, Better, Best.

Life is a balance, choosing the best choices you can is all any of us can do. Here at Marilyn K. Jones we want to be a part of that and help you get the best that you can. Call us today.